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Forum topic by artsee posted 09-04-2012 11:29 AM 671 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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artsee

1 post in 811 days


09-04-2012 11:29 AM

Was wondering if there is a filter for air compressors to filter out the moisture?


12 replies so far

View PaulHWood's profile

PaulHWood

127 posts in 973 days


#1 posted 09-04-2012 01:13 PM

Harbor Freight has several in line filters

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1515 posts in 1235 days


#2 posted 09-04-2012 03:40 PM

I just bought a Harbor Freight unit, and put it on my 2HP Coleman 30 gallon tank unit. Paid about $19, and I got the filter/regulator unit combo. Works like a dream.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View nwbusa's profile

nwbusa

1017 posts in 1006 days


#3 posted 09-04-2012 03:47 PM

Filters are especially useful if you are spraying with an air gun. I haven’t noticed a need when using other air tools like nailers.

-- John, BC, Canada

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Tennessee

1515 posts in 1235 days


#4 posted 09-04-2012 03:53 PM

Not sure I agree with that. When I hired a well-recommended roofer two years ago, they did the job over the weekend. During the day, I noticed a definite decrease in “nail hits”. I climbed up and sure as the dickens, two of their air guns were down. They had resorted to hammers. They really didn’t know why the guns had failed since it was hot and dry.
I asked if I could see them, told them of my woodworking and maintenance background, and they agreed.

Both of the guns were not only rusty inside from all the water in the air, one was just about full of water. I sprayed them all out with WD-40 and a water displacer, then oiled them back up and tested them on my air compressor. They performed perfectly, and I returned them to the crew. They were so grateful they did some extra work for free.
Now I know these guys should have known, but it was about 90’, maybe 25% humidity, and they thought their pancake compressors would not produce that kind of moisture. Wrong….

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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nwbusa

1017 posts in 1006 days


#5 posted 09-04-2012 04:32 PM

I wasn’t making a blanket statement that filters aren’t needed with nailers, just that it hasn’t been an issue for me. Everyone’s situation will be different depending on environmental factors, tools, etc. Moral of the story—use a filter if you need one :)

-- John, BC, Canada

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11678 posts in 2408 days


#6 posted 09-04-2012 04:59 PM

”with WD-40 and a water displacer”
Hi Tennesee , The WD-40 stands for water displacing-formula 40. What was your second “displacer” ?
Sounds like your roofers never read the instructions on how to maintain their compressors OR their guns.

artsee , if your question pertains to moisture after the air is compressed , yes , there are hundreds of different styles to choose from. I spent big money on an inline from Sears and then stumbled across the same thing from Harbor Freight for less than half the price. They also make automatic oilers if your equipment / tools needs one. This is about as basic as you can get , but I’m sure you’ll find one to fit your needs.
http://www.harborfreight.com/air-tools/air-tool-accessories/disposable-inline-moisture-filter-68224.html
Be sure to drain your compressor daily : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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David

196 posts in 1384 days


#7 posted 09-04-2012 06:41 PM

I’m a bit skeptical myself about whether or not the inline filters work to remove moisture (no question on dust/dirt though). Moisture is going to form wherever there is a fast pressure drop, so the primary spots would be after the regulator and at the tool outlet. On the clear filters you can definitely see moisture when firing a nail or using a tool, but unless the filter has a way of getting rid of the condensed water, it’s just going to evaporate again and stay in the air line. At work we have a dedicated air dryer to remove moisture from the air, but I don’t see how a sealed filter like the HF model will do anything for water.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

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David

196 posts in 1384 days


#8 posted 09-04-2012 06:46 PM

Just found this one on the HF website: http://www.harborfreight.com/air-tools/air-tool-accessories/inline-desiccant-dryerfilter-68215.html

It actually contains a desiccant to absorb the moisture. You might even be able to bake the moisture out and re-use it.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1515 posts in 1235 days


#9 posted 09-04-2012 06:58 PM

Dusty56: You are right, I just never use it as a water displacer. I always use it kind of as a cleaner since it tends to evaporate. The water displacer was rubbing alcohol, just a little bit of it with a dropper and then put my dry air through it.
After that, I added lightweight refined oil as you would use in any air-powered nailer. Waited a couple minutes to let it go through, and put the air to them. They ran great for the rest of the job.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1515 posts in 1235 days


#10 posted 09-04-2012 07:03 PM

I understand what you are saying, David, but I shot a lot of furniture over the years, and more than a few cars with nothing more than a moisture separator and filter on my air compressor. And not all the HF units, for instance, are sealed. Mine has a push-button pressure drain on it, and I can see any water in the sight portion of the glass jar. Considering that I am regulating down the pressure at the filter/regulator, the only pressure drop left would be when I pull the trigger. Doesn’t seem like enough time for water to form at that point.
I don’t know if it would be good enough for a really high-end custom paint house, but it’s fine for me.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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MrRon

2928 posts in 1964 days


#11 posted 09-04-2012 07:46 PM

Some cabinet shops use compressed air dryers. They are expensive but necessary, especially in high humidity areas. They work by cooling down the air and extracting the moisture.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1515 posts in 1235 days


#12 posted 09-04-2012 07:51 PM

Yes, my company sells those under the Atlas-Copco name. Refrigerated Dryers, they have a compressor system that has a chilled condensor coil that the air passes over and removes the moisture. Many have some sort of reheater to make sure further moisture is not gathered up when the air leaves the dryer. Generally the air path is long and inserted into some kind of chamber so it is more efficient and more air hits more coils. Water collects and is discharged, usually through some kind of pressurized drain.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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