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When to replace drill brushes?

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Forum topic by motownjg posted 688 days ago 4098 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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motownjg

24 posts in 698 days


688 days ago

I’ve had a Makita cordless and corded drill since 1982/1983 and have never replaced the motor brushes.

Should I? Both work just fine, although well-used, they seem to have the same power/battery life they’ve always had. But I’ve read some people replace the motor brushes for better performance and I thought I’d ask.

What’s the consensus? Replace them when the motor bogs down? Or on a regular service interval?

Thanks

John

-- John


18 replies so far

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rance

4125 posts in 1756 days


#1 posted 688 days ago

If you wait until you have problems, then you waited too long. Pull them out and check them. If they get too short and the little wire inside them starts rubbing on your armature, it will damage it. Look up new brushes and compare. They are cheap.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

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NiteWalker

2696 posts in 1172 days


#2 posted 687 days ago

A lot of brushes have wear lines; if they’re close to or at the wear line, replace them.

Another good rule of thumb is to replace them if they’re shorter than they are wide.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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motownjg

24 posts in 698 days


#3 posted 687 days ago

Where can I look for advice on how to do this procedure?

I have a Milwaukee Sawzall and it clearly has access screws to the brushes on the outside of the housing.

But the Makinta corded and cordless drills don’t have anything obvious for me to remove to access the brushes. Seems like I’d just have to take it apart entirely and see what’s inside. No? Thoughts?

John

-- John

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MrUnix

453 posts in 794 days


#4 posted 687 days ago

Some don’t have access to the brushes.. for example, my Makita cordless has a sealed DC motor and the brushes are not replaceable. If you don’t see access screws/covers for the brushes, then yours may or may not be replaceable. Instead of tearing it apart to find out, it’s usually easier to take a look at the exploded parts diagram for your tool first. Most tools have them in the back of the manual, or you can find them online at places like ereplacementparts.com

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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motownjg

24 posts in 698 days


#5 posted 687 days ago

That was my thought. I found several internet sites that had exploded diagrams of the Makita 6095d and none of them specifically referred to “brushes” in the parts diagram. Makes sense that they’re sealed instead of replaceable.

Also makes since since the thing has run like a champ for over 30 years. Oh well. Maybe I was worring over nothing.

-- John

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MrUnix

453 posts in 794 days


#6 posted 687 days ago

I have an old 6012HD which uses the same motor, and you can’t replace the brushes.. you would need to replace the motor if it ever goes out (about $40). I also have a just slightly newer but still 9.6v 6226D that is the same, although the replacement motor for it is only about $18. But like you say, these things just keep working like a champ, year after year. I think I paid something like $20 for the 6012 about 20 years ago, and $15 for the 6226 about 5 years ago and have used the snot out of both of them (and both were used when I bought them, so I have no idea how much abuse they took before I got them). I’ve thought about replacing them with a newer, higher voltage model, but I can’t imagine what it could do any better than the ones I have now, other than maybe have that fancy little LED light on it :) Every time I do get the urge, I go look at the prices of new ones and that gets rid of it pretty fast.. particularly when I look at the festool! For that kind of price, I would expect them to throw in a mariachi band, case of tequilla and a couple of hookers!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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rance

4125 posts in 1756 days


#7 posted 687 days ago

It may be a brushless motor. If there is not access from the outside, then I expect you have a brushless motor. Google “dc brushless vs brushed motors” and you’ll find pertinent information such as http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brushless_DC_electric_motor .

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

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Jim Finn

1637 posts in 1517 days


#8 posted 687 days ago

I have Makita 9.2 volt drills that I have had since 2001, that I use every day and they still run just fine. Just keep using them until they quit. I think mine may outlive me! Ha ha.

-- In God We Trust

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Bob Kollman

1796 posts in 1786 days


#9 posted 687 days ago

Your drill is as old as my youngest daughter. Great life for a cordless drill.

-- Bob Kenosha Wi.

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motownjg

24 posts in 698 days


#10 posted 687 days ago

Same business on the corded makita drill? Runs fine, but no easy access screw holes to the brushes, so it must be sealed or brushless.

Did they make brushless motors in the middle 1980’s?

-- John

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Pete_Jud

423 posts in 2348 days


#11 posted 687 days ago

I have found that if the tool does not have the screw top brush retainer, it is a throwaway tool. I have several PC routers, and maybe 100 bucks of replacement brushes on the shelf to replace, and check them every couple of months. But my Makita drill motors are getting over 20 years old , and the batts, are getting so spendy that I am considering tossing all of them in a dumpster even though they still work fine. (it will be a responsible no land fill for the batts).

-- Life is to short to own an ugly boat.

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MonteCristo

2094 posts in 784 days


#12 posted 687 days ago

A cordless drill from 1982/1983. They don’t make ‘em like that these days !

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

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rance

4125 posts in 1756 days


#13 posted 687 days ago

Pete, please consider giving them to someone that is willing to use them. Maybe they have good batteries and could use another drill. Or sell on CL.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

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MrRon

2715 posts in 1839 days


#14 posted 687 days ago

Outside replacement of brushes is a feature on most high priced tools. If they are not acceassible from the outside (a convenience feature), you will have to take it apart to get to the brushes. All have replacable brushes, except for the very cheapest tools, because replacement brushes are not part of their repair parts list (if they even have one). Go to a parts center like www.ereplacement parts.com for breakdown lists of parts available.
When to replace them? I would say when they spark excessively as the tool is running. This can be observed near the rear of the tool where the brushes are located. There is always an opening in the plastic case where the brushes are visible.

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dhazelton

1155 posts in 892 days


#15 posted 687 days ago

I had the 9.6 (?) volt Makita that took the long battery and when I needed a new battery it was more money than a new 14.4 volt unit. Are you getting your batteries rebuilt?

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

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