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Forum topic by Paul posted 09-02-2012 09:41 PM 1203 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Paul

85 posts in 1087 days


09-02-2012 09:41 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hello folks!

Well I was lucky enough to come into some old barn wood from my wifes family and would like an ID if possible :) I can only assume its from stuff in Central TX so Oak or Pine maybe?

Also I have attached what looks like termite damage however it is not “spongy” at all ... Do you guys think that all of them are dead? Should I even chance using this as decoration in my house?

I spent the day scraping these with a wire brush and I like what I see on the back side :) I love seeing the saw marks :)

-- - Paul, Flower Mound,TX


13 replies so far

View john's profile

john

2293 posts in 3036 days


#1 posted 09-02-2012 09:48 PM

Probably Hemlock ! Most barns were built from hemlock .

-- John in Belgrave (Website) http://www.extremebirdhouse.com , http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=112698715866

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Paul

85 posts in 1087 days


#2 posted 09-03-2012 02:26 AM

Cool! I never knew that Hemlock was found in TX hehe.

-- - Paul, Flower Mound,TX

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1505 days


#3 posted 09-03-2012 05:20 PM

Certainly a softwood, the way the soft has worn away.

Some bugs can be killed by wrapping the wood in black plastic and leaving it outside in the heat. Anybody know what kind of duration for the incarceration?

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1130 posts in 1130 days


#4 posted 09-04-2012 01:43 AM

It is old growth southern yellow pine. Probably loblolly, but could be longleaf. The wood of both is indistinguishable from each other.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

14187 posts in 992 days


#5 posted 09-04-2012 01:58 AM

My guess would be pine.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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Moron

4666 posts in 2548 days


#6 posted 09-04-2012 03:45 AM

Hemlock

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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Rick M.

3964 posts in 1034 days


#7 posted 09-04-2012 07:49 AM

Southern yellow pine, see how the soft wood has eroded between the harder rings.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View treaterryan's profile

treaterryan

109 posts in 941 days


#8 posted 09-04-2012 10:12 AM

It Southern Yellow Pine as Wood-Mizer said.

-- Ryan - Bethel Park, PA

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1130 posts in 1130 days


#9 posted 09-04-2012 11:38 AM

Southern yellow pine has resin canals that you can see as a sprinkling of larger pore openings in the cross section. Page 8 of this publication shows the resin canals in southern yellow pine. Hemlock does not have resin canals. That will help you separate hemlock from pine.

http://msucares.com/pubs/publications/p2606.pdf

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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Paul

85 posts in 1087 days


#10 posted 09-04-2012 02:30 PM

Awesome thanks folks!

Now the Termite/bug question

These have been sitting in the Texas sun for lord knows how many years. Is the termite damage on these cause for alarm? do you guys even think that they are alive? Lee Above mentioned putting them in black bags in the sun?

-- - Paul, Flower Mound,TX

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1447 posts in 1169 days


#11 posted 09-04-2012 03:23 PM

I’d be more worried about powder-post beatles than termites. Termites usually go for a wood that still has sap in it. I doubt that there is any digestable sap left in this wood. The beatles, on the other hand, can survive for years. Leave a piece somewhere very clean, in a reasonable temperature, like maybe on concrete in a steel building, and see if any wood dust forms anywhere on the floor or around and on the wood. If it does in a couple weeks, you have insects.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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Paul

85 posts in 1087 days


#12 posted 09-04-2012 08:35 PM

and THIS is why I love LJ :-D

Thank you all!!

-- - Paul, Flower Mound,TX

View Fishinbo's profile

Fishinbo

11236 posts in 830 days


#13 posted 09-04-2012 09:21 PM

Go ahead and make a spectacular piece out of this oldie!

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