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Forum topic by AaronL posted 08-30-2012 11:22 PM 2630 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AaronL

14 posts in 817 days


08-30-2012 11:22 PM

Hi, I am dying to buy my first table saw after giving back to a friend a cheap Ryobi contractor saw that I have dealt with for the last 1.5 yrs. I want to build furniture and do a lot of projects around my old house. Anyway, a lot people say to buy a saw that will last a lifetime, and I found a G1023SLX on craigslist for $750. It doesn’t come with anything extra as far as I know. Can someone tell me how small of a weight and size i can break it down to try to fit it into my basement? I only have about a 31” wide doorway to my basement. Once inside, I can push the largest part (the cabinet and part of the top?) in about 43” absolute max to get down my stairs IF the saw is only 41” tall. If the saw can’t go lower than 41” tall, I have less than 43” to get down my stairs. I thought if I got 3 other guys, I could have one guy on each corner and get it down my stairs if these dimensions work. Thanks for helping me with this annoying question! If you know of another good cabinet saw that I could fit with my dimensions, please let me know and i will keep an eye out on craigslist!

My other option is to just go ahead and get a mint (seriously, no flaws) powermatic 64A for maybe $400, most likely $450 with no extras.

Thank you! Aaron


32 replies so far

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knotscott

5561 posts in 2097 days


#1 posted 08-31-2012 12:29 AM

The fence, wings, and any extension tables should come off pretty easily, leaving the main top and base…the main top should be 20” x 27” deep, and is removable….be sure to check for any factory shims when removing the top, and install them in exactly the same order. The base cabinet should be under 20” x 20”x 33”H, plus a few inches for the motor and handles if you don’t remove them. The motor can be removed if you need to shave more weight, but the size of the base shouldn’t be too large.

The Grizzly is substantially more saw than the PM64a… if it’s in the budget, and you’ve got 220v, grab it! No mas!

Guts of a G1023 cabinet saw:

Here’s what the base and top look like when stripped down:

Guts of a contractor saw like the PM64a:

Front shot of the PM64a:

Back shot of a Jet that’s similar to the PM64a:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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AaronL

14 posts in 817 days


#2 posted 08-31-2012 01:54 AM

Thanks for the reply, knotscot. I’ve seen a lot of your posts on this forum as I’ve been searching for woodworking related items. I like your willingness to give everyone good advice. The shot of the innards of the two saws makes me feel a little bit sick that I have been thinking of a contractor saw. I am convinced that a cabinet saw will be my best bet for the long-term. I can do the $750 no problem. I just don’t like spending money needlessly. I don’t care about getting THE best deal. I just want a decent price for a great product. I’ll see if the Grizzly is really in good condition and make an offer if it is. I’m sure those dimensions can fit as long as I can heave it into my basement with friends’ help. I’m sure they will want to come over and use it for their own projects as well, so they can take advantage of my purchase whenever they want! Thanks again for your input. It’s invaluable!

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chrisstef

11341 posts in 1728 days


#3 posted 08-31-2012 02:14 AM

Ive got an older model 1023. I managed to get the top off solo but it was a struggle. Id say about 150 lbs. The base was around the same, definately a 2 man operation. Motor about 50 lbs. Mine is a 1997 left tilt and i paid $550 with a garbage blade, stock fence, anti kick back roller, and 3 throat inserts here in CT which is a typically expensive market. I fit mine through a regular 36” door with the crank handles on motor off.

I havent fired up the saw yet, no 220, so i cant comment just yet on performance.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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AaronL

14 posts in 817 days


#4 posted 08-31-2012 02:17 AM

knotscott (or others), do you think this would be another good option? It looks pretty good to me, though more expensive. it says only 15 hours use!

http://hartford.craigslist.org/tls/3187106492.html

Thanks for the reply chrisstef! I’m getting more confident I can hoist it into my house with some help, exciting!

If I had to take off the top, what do the factory shims look like and do they have to be positioned exactly the same? Are they glued in or just pinched by pressure of the table?

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chrisstef

11341 posts in 1728 days


#5 posted 08-31-2012 02:28 AM

The tops held on with 4 bolts and shims looked like thin paper washers on mine. CT lj here too. East of the river. Originally from the waterbury area. No sweat at all with 2 guys.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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knotscott

5561 posts in 2097 days


#6 posted 08-31-2012 03:21 AM

That Delta Unisaw is a pretty sweet saw and that’s a good deal. American made. It’s the saw the Grizzly and others are modeled after. The price is good, but it does say “best offer”. $900-$950 is a reasonable offer IMO.

There’s probably not much argument that a Unisaw is the “next step” in quality and construction, but both of these saws push the envelope of overkill for a hobbyist. The Griz at $750 is an excellent hobby saw. The Unisaw at $950 is a tremendous hobby saw. Each will only perform as well as the setup and blade selection allow. The Griz @ $750 allows for a couple of nice blades or a dado stack for the same total outlay. If you don’t mind spending the money, and you truly want to buy the once…the Uni has the upper hand IMHO.

Executive decision time!

Here’s a pic of the guts of an older Unisaw (they haven’t changed much):

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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AaronL

14 posts in 817 days


#7 posted 08-31-2012 03:22 AM

chrisstef,

are you saying the cabinet without the top is around 150lbs? that’s even better news, as i can handle that with one other person easily. how easy is it to replace the top and have the shims correctly placed. i don’t want to f’-up the top alignment!

i’m actually living in poughkeepsie, ny now, but i am looking within a 2-3 hr radius for good saw deals on craigslist. where do you find good rough-milled lumber that is high quality and at a fair price for woodworking projects? i saw american lumber company is in the area and thought it might be a good bet. i can’t wait to start making some furniture this winter! i have to put in a new cork floor first for the wife!

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AaronL

14 posts in 817 days


#8 posted 08-31-2012 03:32 AM

knotscott, thanks again for the info. i noticed it said best offer too. i thought i’d make a little lower offer and see what happens. i don’t want to rip someone off, but i like deals as much as anyone! honestly, if this is a purchase that will last the bulk of my young, energetic life (35-55), i don’t care if it costs a bit more. what’s $1000 over 20 years?! i’ll just see which is still available and go for it! i have to say that these saws look like overkill to me, but i love the idea of getting a high-quality american-made product that will last a long time. the powermatic was off-putting as a foreign product, especially when i am a union man.
good to hear that both will work well. my dad, an old wood-worker hobbyist is coming for a first visit from Montana in a few weeks, so maybe he can help me buy some nice blades and such for it! I can’t believe he has spent the last 30 years with a 9” craftsman he bought locally. He used that thing the whole time i was growing up and never complained. It’s amazing what he was able to produce with it, though he wasted a lot of time aligning the fence and never really made anything artisanal. life’s a journey!

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AaronL

14 posts in 817 days


#9 posted 08-31-2012 03:36 AM

hey knotscott, i also forgot to ask you (since you have a hand plane on your profile picture) about where I can get a good refurbished hand plane. I watched some videos by the hand tool school guy, Shannon and it really turned me onto getting a smoothing plane and using it instead of sand paper for smoothing my finished component pieces. Do you think his hand tool school (online) would be a good investment? I’m taken with the idea of working wood in the old ways when it seems superior. Of course, I also like the idea of a good mechanized table saw as a basis all of my projects and woodworking. I just want to use what works best for me.

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chrisstef

11341 posts in 1728 days


#10 posted 08-31-2012 11:19 AM

Aaron – The cabinet itself weighs in around 100 lbs but it pretty awkward to move with one guy. The top is very easy to align, i used a level, straight edge, and feeler gauges so really nothing to worry about with that. Good rough cut lumber isnt terribly hard to find. In CT i know a local sawmill guy that saw native oak and maple. For other stuff i go to CWG in Enfield. A good resource is woodfinder.com, it will search within a particularr radius for you. Theres plenty of guys around here in western NY, dot be afraid to throw up a post looking for where they shop for lumber.

FWIW – KnotScott is the resident tablesaw and blade guru, hes done a couple of great blogs/posts about blades and saws. His knowledge on the subject is top notch stuff. I may dub him Doc Saw soon. The Forrest WWII is one of the top of the line blades at around $125 its pricey. Some other good blades can be found at reasonabe prices. The freuds are pretty well regarded as well.

For a few good hand planes and how to tune them up visit LumberJock Don W’s blogs ( http://lumberjocks.com/donwilwol ) . He also has a personal website where he sells refurbished planes. Good old american cast iron stuff. Let me warn you though, you get hooked up with him like i did and its a slippery slope to the hand tool world. If you’re really sick and dont mind a little locker room humor mixed in visit Handplane of Your Dreams thread. Ill warn you though itll take you most of the weekend to get through it all.

You’re gonna find enough info here that you just might spend your labor day weekend glued to your computer. There’s a ton of hand tool / power tool hybrid guys around here (im starting to fall into this category). A small investment into a #4, #5, block plane, and card scrapers will cut down your sanding considerably without breaking the bank.

Welcome to the gang Aaron.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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knotscott

5561 posts in 2097 days


#11 posted 08-31-2012 07:12 PM

Sorry I’m not familiar with the online hand plane school, but it’d certainly be worth investigating some more, and/or even making a separate post about it on the hand tool forum so the true hand plane guru’s can chime in….I basically just “play” with them! There are a few guys on these forums that refurb and resell nice old planes….check the free classifieds here, and at places like Woodnet.net. It looks like Chris has got some solid leads for you. I’ve also obtained many on Ebay, most of which I refurbed myself.

I haven’t bought any lumber downstate…..PA might be your best bet in that neck of the woods.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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AaronL

14 posts in 817 days


#12 posted 09-14-2012 08:10 PM

OK, guys. I went and saw the Unisaw. It was an awesome saw! Unfortunately, the guy had it in a garage that didn’t have any 220V power! God. I think it would have been a good saw, but I thought about it a lot and decided that I’m going to hold off for now. I think I want to get a solid, older saw and work with that for awhile before committing to a cabinet saw. I’ve had a lot of bills lately and probably should hold off. I can always sell it for a decent price later if I want to upgrade. I saw a Craftsman 113.298762 on craigslist:

http://hudsonvalley.craigslist.org/tls/3220701893.html

The owner said it was used to cut some cedar for a house he was working on and then a couple other projects and has been stored in his garage and not used a lot more than that. He said there wasn’t any pitting, but there is some rust that should come off easily. Seems like a good bet for a reliable saw. Here’s his quote:

“Its still available,no pitting, great shape, it’s been in my garage for the past 12 years. It runs great, I bought it new and paid around $400.00.”

I can’t find a ton of information about the 113.298762 online, but I assume that it is one of the quality, old Craftsmen that have been discussed a lot on the boards. I planned on checking it to see if runs well and then offer $75. Maybe I can get it for $100 and then upgrade the fence if I can’t live with the stock fence. Does that sound like a reasonable plan?

Can you give me some ideas about what to check on the saw? What is the best way to check the alignment without a dial indicator? I could also order an expedited alignment kit if that would be best. I hope to go see it early next week.

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cabmaker

1311 posts in 1531 days


#13 posted 09-14-2012 08:37 PM

100 is certainly a reasonable price for that saw. I think it is wise for you to hold off as well. (on a cab. saw that is) I had a craftsman similar to that and it did pretty well. It was used as a job saw for twenty or so years. Its probably a one hp which is a bit underpowered but for hobbiest use you may never need to buy another saw. Just because it seems everyone is buying a cabinet saw doesnt mean its a must have. Most hobbiests would have to work at it to wear out a decent contractor saw in their lifetime. Hope you get it and enjoy it ! JB

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AaronL

14 posts in 817 days


#14 posted 09-14-2012 08:41 PM

Thanks for the reply! I’ll check it out.

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bunkie

411 posts in 1869 days


#15 posted 09-14-2012 09:05 PM

I’ve owned that Craftsman saw and for $100 and under it’s a good deal. A solid saw that, with some upgrades, can be a long-term item.

WRT the 1023SLX, I manhandled my 1023SL into my walkout basement shop by myself. I bought a hand truck specifically for this purpose on my way to Grizzley when I got the saw using a friend’s pickup truck (but no friend, he was busy elsewhere!). He lent me ramp as well.

I separated the top and the saw body and strapped each in turn to the hand truck. It was hard work, but I did it and also did the saw reassembly and setup myself using a combination of saw horses, the hand truck and some muscle. Not easy, but I did it.

-- Altruism is, ultimately, self-serving

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