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Spruce for a homemade jointer

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Forum topic by Cole Tallerman posted 08-30-2012 03:38 PM 630 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cole Tallerman

391 posts in 842 days


08-30-2012 03:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: using spruce

So im going to build Matthias Wandel’s jointer, but it calls for 6/4 spruce. the only thing that i can find at home depot and loves are spruce studs and 5/4 spruce. My questions are, is there another type of wood that works similarly to spruce that can be found at big box stores? Also, what is the price range that i’m looking at? Is spruce considered a hardwood? would normal pine work?

Also, I can get Maple at 30% off the going rate. Would that be better? Id still like to hear what you have to say about using spruce and even doug fir.

Thanks!


9 replies so far

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1369 posts in 1289 days


#1 posted 08-30-2012 03:41 PM

I’m pretty sure Douglas Fir would be a suitable substitute. You could buy a Doug fir 4×4

View 1stmistake's profile

1stmistake

13 posts in 828 days


#2 posted 08-30-2012 04:04 PM

A big box store probably won’t have what you’re looking for… there’s probably a mill or outlet close by that would have it though. Try http://www.woodfinder.com/

View Loren's profile

Loren

7567 posts in 2305 days


#3 posted 08-30-2012 04:08 PM

Spruce, hemlock and fir are sold as “white wood” or
“hem-fir” in many areas. The working characteristics
of the included woods are similar.

Just try to get something dry and relatively straight-grained
and free of all but the smallest knots. It should behave
predictably then.

2×4 Studs are 6/4 – it means 1 1/2” thick finished dimension.

Spruce is softwood. Pine tends to be easier to work
because it doesn’t splinter as much but it is less tough
too, imo. I’m generalizing lots here because pine and
spruce are similar. We use spruce in making guitar tops,
for example, because it is stiff and tough in small
thicknesses so it can be worked to thin, lightweight
panels and still have a lot of structural strength.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Cole Tallerman's profile

Cole Tallerman

391 posts in 842 days


#4 posted 08-31-2012 06:36 PM

I might use douglas fir then. Thanks everyone. Any thought on using maple?

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2528 posts in 1008 days


#5 posted 08-31-2012 07:25 PM

Studs are 6/4.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Alexandre's profile

Alexandre

1417 posts in 848 days


#6 posted 08-31-2012 07:34 PM

You could use maple, But you must be willing enough to fork out that cold hard cash :P

-- My terrible signature...

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

3977 posts in 1037 days


#7 posted 09-01-2012 02:20 AM

Matthias Wandel’s jointer, but it calls for 6/4 spruce

Yeah, I’m pretty certain he’s just using SPF 2×4/6/8s.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View Cole Tallerman's profile

Cole Tallerman

391 posts in 842 days


#8 posted 09-01-2012 02:25 AM

Well if a 2×4 is 6/4, I would like some room to be able to square the edges (as they come rounded) so 2/4’s wouldn’t be big enough. i can get maple for the same price as poplar and i would only really heed one board. I still can’t decide though.

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

3977 posts in 1037 days


#9 posted 09-01-2012 07:59 PM

Use a 2×6 and trim off the rounded edges or a 2×8 and rip 2 pieces from it.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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