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Planer Sled

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Forum topic by FirehouseWoodworking posted 722 days ago 2523 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FirehouseWoodworking

622 posts in 1899 days


722 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: planer milling jig

I need your thoughts and experiences on building a planer sled before I take the plunge.

I am thinking about building a planer sled to effectively lengthen the planer’s infeed and outfeed tables. I own a DeWalt planer. The sled would be built from half-inch MDF, appropriately supported along its length, and covered with a piece of laminate to make it somewhat slick. I would ensure that the sled is flat all along its length.

My reasoning tells me that longer infeed and outfeed would reduce snipe.

I’m not overly concerned about losing the 5/8” or so of depth. I could always remove it on the rare occasion that it might matter.

My only reservation is that with constant use, would the area under the rollers and blades become worn enough as to effect the quality of planing or even making more snipe.

What are your thoughts or experiences? Thank you in advance!

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas


12 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

473 posts in 825 days


#1 posted 722 days ago

If it is to be installed more or less permanently and you plan on running a lot of BF through it, there may be an issue of wear on the surface. You could always cover the top with metal instead of laminate.. you can pick up a roll of aluminum flashing at the borg that would probably work just fine. Keep it waxed and it would be as slick or slicker than any laminate you could put on there.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View FirehouseWoodworking's profile

FirehouseWoodworking

622 posts in 1899 days


#2 posted 722 days ago

Good idea. Thanks, Brad.

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

View CplSteel's profile

CplSteel

142 posts in 790 days


#3 posted 721 days ago

The sleds I have used were torsion boxes. kind of like this one. I would make clamping easier then this board. I sled I liked was more of a bridge, the wings of the planer were removed and the sled fit over the sled base so the piece was well supported throughout. You can even build some DC into the sled if you want to get sexy.

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1850 posts in 2187 days


#4 posted 721 days ago

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/33320 was my solution. As you can see the in/out tables can be adjusted interdependently of each other, thereby retaining the metal surface under the rollers and cutters.

(To minimize snipe, the end tables need to be tilted up slightly. A dead flat surface won’t prevent snipe.)

I put three coats of poly on the mdf and keep it waxed and it works great

-- Joe

View CplSteel's profile

CplSteel

142 posts in 790 days


#5 posted 721 days ago

@asosephg – Good looking table. I could be wrong, and often am, but I thought snipe was caused when the board is only Engadget by one of the rollers, and something: vibration, a wood chip, uneven support, caused the part of the board under the blade to angle up too much. Therefore dead flat would prevent snipe as long as it doesn’t flex. Also, if your out feed table is angled up it seems that the end of your boards would taper. Obviously better than if the were angled down which would guarantee snipe. How much of an angle are we talking about?

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ajosephg

1850 posts in 2187 days


#6 posted 721 days ago

There are a lot of theories about what causes Snipe. A common thread to the prevention of it is to slightly lift the end of the board when the cut starts and to slightly lift the end just before the cut ends. (Snipe occurs on both ends sometimes, the leading end sometimes, and the following end other times.).

Many people (including me) assume that it will happen and allow for it by cutting the board length oversize then trimming it to length after all planing it.

My set up does not produce a snipe most of the time, but ever so often—-. When I said my end tables are tilted up slightly, I mean VERY SLIGHTLY, about 1/16” in 24”. The boards don’t taper because the rollers press them flat against the planer bed during the cutting operation.

-- Joe

View FirehouseWoodworking's profile

FirehouseWoodworking

622 posts in 1899 days


#7 posted 721 days ago

JOE – I really liked your setup. My only question was the bolts sticking up and I saw that you made comment about your concern about a long, narrow piece of stock potentially hanging up on them.

Just curious, have you reversed them? I was thinking that I would use carriage bolts and adjust the tables from below. Your thoughts? Thanks in advance.

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3320 posts in 1439 days


#8 posted 721 days ago

I just use the infeed/outfeed tables for the 735 planer, and I usually won’t get any snipe. I debated on building a stock support, but didn’t want to lose the preset thickness stops which is a very handy feature. For workpieces longer than 4-5 feet, I use a pair of roller supports.
Also have you read the tips to set the outermost edge of your tables “a dimes width higher”
That really helps to eliminate snipe.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1850 posts in 2187 days


#9 posted 720 days ago

Dave

I’ve yet to have a crash into the support table bolts, so I’m leaving them as is. However, carriage bolts would be a good improvement if for no other reason than they would look better.

-- Joe

View FirehouseWoodworking's profile

FirehouseWoodworking

622 posts in 1899 days


#10 posted 720 days ago

Thanks again, Joe.

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3075 posts in 1301 days


#11 posted 720 days ago

Joe is correct. Lift the end of the board to prevent snipe…..hopefully

View Scott Wunder's profile

Scott Wunder

13 posts in 725 days


#12 posted 720 days ago

Firehouse,

I think you are talking about building a planer table and not a sled. A sled would go through the planer with the board and is used to either help flatten or taper boards. If you are talking about a table, then look into using a top on your table made of UHMW plastic. It is slippery and eliminates the need for wax. I have used it for years now and love it. I was always waxing the bed and boards would still get stuck – very frustrating. Not to long ago I wrote a blog entry with photos on this exact topic. You might want to check it out to see exactly what I am talking about.

Click here to read my blog post about a UHMW plastic planer table.

-- Scott Wunder, WunderWoods, St. Charles, MO. Read my sawmilling and woodworking blog at http://www.wunderwoods.com

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