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Rip and Join. Yeah or Nay?

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Forum topic by Philip "Pip" Storm posted 08-28-2012 05:01 PM 731 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Philip "Pip" Storm

128 posts in 986 days


08-28-2012 05:01 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question maple tablesaw sander clamp miter saw planer jointer milling shaker

I am making my kitchen cabinet drawer fronts out of maple. The drawer fronts range from 10” to 34” in length and all are 7” wide. With the boards width, length, and the fact that they will be subject to a decent amount of moisture in the kitchen should I rip each board in half and rejoin to help with cup and warp or am I worrying to much? Not only that, with my work schedule, this project could take up to a month. Some of these freshly milled boards could be sitting around a couple weeks waiting for a finish.

-- Well, I'll be screwed, glued, and tattooed!


11 replies so far

View SuburbanDon's profile

SuburbanDon

484 posts in 1644 days


#1 posted 08-28-2012 05:57 PM

I suppose more experienced members would ask how the wood was cut (quarter sawn etc). Assuming it was flat sawn, and if I wanted to be sure, I would rip them and rejoin them. If I had 16 drawers I might skip this steps. “I usually prefer better safe than sorry”

-- --- Measure twice, mis-cut, start over, repeat ---

View CplSteel's profile

CplSteel

142 posts in 815 days


#2 posted 08-28-2012 06:55 PM

How thick? Big cabinet doors are raised panels to deal with movement. MDF or ply fronts with veneer can give a solid door look without the risk of movement. Otherwise, yeah, resaw and glue. Of course there is a risk of cracking with a resaw and glue if the wood moves too much.

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Philip "Pip" Storm

128 posts in 986 days


#3 posted 08-29-2012 02:52 AM

Thanks for the input y’all. Yes it is flat sawn. These drawer fronts will be 3/4” thick and solid maple. Not paneled or veneered. I have 7 total. Two 16”, two 20”, two 30”, and one 34”. It’s the 30” and 34” that concern me. I wasn’t considering resawing. My band saw is not big enough to resaw 7+ inches. I guess if I do decide to rip and rejoin I should probably invest in a thin kerf so the grain will line back up as much as possible. Yes, no, maybe?

-- Well, I'll be screwed, glued, and tattooed!

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CplSteel

142 posts in 815 days


#4 posted 08-29-2012 03:08 AM

Well if you orientate the grain so any expansion takes place along the 7” width then the length is largely irrelevant if the grain is straight enough. If you won’t do a veneer then resaw and glue then let it rest a week. Hopefully it will settle without too much cupping Good luck.

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 1701 days


#5 posted 08-29-2012 03:12 AM

Pip,

According to Bob Lang, you worry too much. If the wood was properly dried you should have no problem. Sitting around waiting for a finish won’t have any effect, nor will having a finish help. Studies have shown that the only finish that retards moisture movement in wood after 6 weeks is house paint. Well dried wood should be stable for life. Wide boards were the signature of fine wood working back in the 17th and 18th centuries and they didn’t have too much problem.

Besides, the length will have minimal effect. Boards cup across the width and yours are only 7” wide. Nothing to worry about. As to twist or warp, they would have done that most likely coming off the saw or shortly after. If they haven’t, they won’t. Ripping and resawing wouldn’t effect warp or twist anyway, just cupping, which at 7” is not a real threat.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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knotscott

5451 posts in 2026 days


#6 posted 08-29-2012 10:47 AM

I wouldn’t hesitate to use 7” widths unless you think they’d look better if you mated certain grain patterns….

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1778 posts in 1144 days


#7 posted 08-29-2012 11:07 AM

I, too, would not worry about 7” wide drawer fronts. If they were much wider I would likely rip and reglue….but 7” isn’t that wide.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, we sent 'em to Washington.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1126 posts in 1127 days


#8 posted 08-29-2012 11:36 AM

I agree about not ripping and re-gluing if they are not already cupped. If they are not already cupped, then they are not likely to cup unless you put them in an environment where the temperature and humidity are at an extreme difference. Also, once you get them milled to final dimension, do not lay them down flat or stack them flat. Air need to circulate on all sides of the board, and that will go a long way toward keeping things stable.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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Philip "Pip" Storm

128 posts in 986 days


#9 posted 08-29-2012 12:17 PM

Thank you all. I feel more confident about moving forward without re-gluing. Hey Steve, what part of KY? I’m in West Daviess County/ North Mclean-ish.

-- Well, I'll be screwed, glued, and tattooed!

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 1701 days


#10 posted 08-30-2012 05:10 AM

Pip,

I’m in Berea, Madison county. Exits 76, 77, or 83 from I-75. I was going to tell you to destress and watch UK whup on U of L this weekend. Daviess County isn’t that far away. Good to hear from you.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

112067 posts in 2228 days


#11 posted 08-30-2012 05:26 AM

If these are false drawer fronts and if you are screwing these drawer front’s on then just make the screw holes elongated to allow for wood movement. Wood still takes on moisture even if it has been dried properly.
Thus the term Hygroscopic http://www.swst.org/teach/teach2/properties2.pdf

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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