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Forum topic by Kevin posted 08-23-2012 12:40 AM 781 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kevin

445 posts in 1863 days


08-23-2012 12:40 AM

Topic tags/keywords: hand plane planes hand tools

Hi,
I just found this in my dad’s garage that he had stored along with another version which is a bit shorter. The only thing I can see is the initials DE and made in the USA on there. I took a little bit of the rust off today and sharpened the blade. Does anyone know what type or how old this little thing is by chance?

kevin

-- Williamsburg, KY


9 replies so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5306 posts in 1256 days


#1 posted 08-23-2012 12:51 AM

I believe it is a Diamond Edge. Looks like a #5, in Stanley’s sizing #s. Not sure of its vintage. Looks to be in great shape.

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1656 days


#2 posted 08-23-2012 01:14 AM

I would guess WWII or newer. No real basis other than the looks and the size of the adjuster. Diamond Edge is a house brand for Shapleigh Hardware (If I remember correctly) Much like Craftsman for Sears and PowerCraft from Montgomery Wards. They were made by one of the main plane companies. By the looks, I would guess that to be made by Stanley. It is quite nice.

Generally, I think that they are some of the best bargains in tool buying. It lacks the screw adjuster for the frog that is in the higher end models but I don’t think that it is a big deal. I don’t move mine once it is set unless I change the iron. I have a similar #5-1/2 size that is from Lakeside Hardware.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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Kevin

445 posts in 1863 days


#3 posted 08-23-2012 02:05 AM

Glad to get an idea of what kind it is. I can probably clean it up some more also. I did make sure the bottom was nice and flat first thing. I’m just now getting into hand planes and in the process of learning how to use them, restoring them and such. I would like to find a few more to add to my 3 I have so far. I think for me I would rather find some vintage ones and take the time to restore them than pay for a brand new one. Much like the older disston hand saws, just something about the old ones that feels nice.

What should I be looking for and not looking for in a descent hand plane. I know that I can probably look through the many thousand pages on the hand plane topic and find something there, but just a couple of quick things to look for in one now.

thanks guys,

kevin

-- Williamsburg, KY

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5306 posts in 1256 days


#4 posted 08-23-2012 02:16 AM

Pre war Stanleys are a great place to start. Keyhole in the lever cap ( not the kidney shaped one), rosewood handles, patent dates on the sole, frog adjustment screw. These are a few simple things to look for in identifying the age/type of a plane.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2876 days


#5 posted 08-23-2012 03:13 AM

I’ve never had a Diamond Edge, but the construction does look pretty similar to a WWII era Stanley. Should make a perfectly good user!

Like Shane said, if a Stanley has one, two, or three patent dates on the sole behind the frog, that dates it somewhere in the 1902-1930 range. Most folks agree those are excellent candidates for rehab. They are well-built, and can be found at reasonable prices on eBay or at flea markets. You’ll get the best deals on ugly, rusty ones. As long as none of the metal parts are broken and the rust is confined to the surface, it will clean up very nicely and make a great user.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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LockesWS

17 posts in 775 days


#6 posted 08-23-2012 03:21 AM

I got 4 planes total from ebay. The sellers couldn’t give to much info but they looked great. All are Stanley (#3,#4,#5 and a standard block). Shane after reading your post about not the kidney shaped ones that puzzled me a bit. Could you explain about those caps please. I’m thinking all of the bench planes have that cap but everything on them dates pre WWII. I’ll get some pics and post in a min.

-- The things I make may be for others, but how I make them is for me.   - Tony Konovaloff www.lockeswoodshop.com

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

445 posts in 1863 days


#7 posted 08-23-2012 03:37 AM

Thanks for all the info guys. It’s time for me to be on the lookout now :)
I’m thinking that I know what Shane is talking about after googling and looking at some hand planes.

This is the one I was looking at on how to restore them.
http://www.recordhandplanes.com/restoration.html

On the left side you can see about dating hand planes also.

Now to get setup and start practicing using the hand planes.

-- Williamsburg, KY

View LockesWS's profile

LockesWS

17 posts in 775 days


#8 posted 08-23-2012 03:49 AM

The #4 and #5 are apart because I’ve been cleaning them up and had just flattened the soles (#3 is tomorrow) but they all have the kidney shaped cap. I did notice that the brand new #4 (2 years old just taken from box) has a straight key hole.

-- The things I make may be for others, but how I make them is for me.   - Tony Konovaloff www.lockeswoodshop.com

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5306 posts in 1256 days


#9 posted 08-23-2012 03:56 AM

Those look nice, you will begin to notice the little details and design evolutions that help you determine age/type. Nothing wrong w/kidney caps, they just represent the type 16ish and newer. Most of the die hards like the 15 and older. Tuned/sharpened they all can preform. I have several kidney shaped ones.

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