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Forum topic by Richard posted 691 days ago 585 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Richard's profile

Richard

109 posts in 2000 days


691 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: sander drill press

I am making a coffee with an odd shape. No straight lines in the top. I rough cut the top with a jigsaw and now I need to take off the last quarter inch to bring it down to final size and shape. All the curves are outside curves. I would use a router but I can’t set up any straight edges as guides and I don’t trust my jittery hands to do it free-hand. I was thinking a spindle sander would be the best rout. I have a combo disk\belt sander. I also have a small drum sander kit to put on my drill press. I am tempted to try to use what I have but was wondering about safety and putting directional pressures on tools the were not ment to be. Any thoughts would be appreciated.


9 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3319 posts in 2545 days


#1 posted 691 days ago

There are those who will caution about using sanding drums on a drill press because of side-loading the quill bearings. I have done it, but now have an OSS (Ridgid).
Just my thoughts.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View oluf's profile

oluf

256 posts in 1623 days


#2 posted 690 days ago

Use your sanding drums in a hand drill and keep them moving up and down as you sand. This is only if you do not have an OSS or the top is too heavy to handle on the OSS work surface.

-- Nils, So. Central MI. Wood is honest.Take the effort to understand what it has to tell you before you try to change it.

View jmos's profile

jmos

681 posts in 954 days


#3 posted 690 days ago

Spokeshaves and rasps will remove a lot of material quickly, and with a heck of a lot less dust than sanding. I would prefer to shape with them and sand for a final finish.

-- John

View rance's profile

rance

4125 posts in 1745 days


#4 posted 690 days ago

I would not be as concerned with messing up the bearings. I’d say you are more likely to have the drum work loose from the Jacobs chuck and possibly get thrown across the shop. A bearing on the lower part of the drum(at the table) would take care of that though.

And +1 to what John said. Although I’d go find a power tool version. :D

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Richard's profile

Richard

109 posts in 2000 days


#5 posted 690 days ago

Thanks for the reply’s everyone. My cheap side says use what I got and modify it. In the back of my mind I was wondering if there was a hand tool that was better for the job. I need to remove about a 1/4 inch from the edge of the table top that is 3/4 inch thick. Is a spoke-shave best for this application or perhaps some other plane?

View rance's profile

rance

4125 posts in 1745 days


#6 posted 690 days ago

Or a hand-held belt sander with 36 grit paper. Seriously. So why did you not get any closer than 1/4”? It would make your next process easier.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Richard's profile

Richard

109 posts in 2000 days


#7 posted 690 days ago

Well it actually varies. most places are probably more like an eighth inch. I was using a jigsaw so I was worried about tear-out. Not to mention my unsteady hand.

View teejk's profile

teejk

1205 posts in 1269 days


#8 posted 690 days ago

First I would lay a strip of blue painter’s tape on the field to define the finished dimensions. Then use whatever you have to get closer (without touching the tape).

From there, any tool with a flat table perpendicular to the tool should work to get to the tape edge. I personally have problems with hand helds (belt sanders etc) in keeping perpendicular to the top. Maybe it’s just me.

View jmos's profile

jmos

681 posts in 954 days


#9 posted 690 days ago

A lot depends on the type of curve, you can use a block plane, if the blade will contact the curve as you go around (trying to avoid talking convex and concave to avoid confusion). A spokeshave will work on either type curve (there are different types of shaves, a flat base will work similar to the block plane, a curved base shave is better for an ‘inside’ curve), a rough rasp will do either type of curve and can hog off some material (follow up with finer rasps or sanding to smooth the surface left by the rasp), a drawaknife can work well too.

Card scrapers work nicely for doing some fine shaping and finishing off the edge.

If you want to go power, you can make a template out of thinner material (hardboard or thin plywood) and use a template following bit on your router. Fix the template to the work with clamps or double sided tape. If you use the same template for opposite sides of the piece it will ensure symmetry (assuming that’s what you are going for).

Yup, a belt sander with a low grit will hog some material too, but noisy and dusty.

Spindle sander will certainly work too. I lean toward other methods when I can, but if it works, and you have the tools, it’s a good option too.

-- John

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