LumberJocks

Routing tight curves

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Rickterscale posted 08-17-2012 10:35 PM 1481 views 0 times favorited 2 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Rickterscale's profile

Rickterscale

162 posts in 1827 days


08-17-2012 10:35 PM

Topic tags/keywords: epoxy inaly router curves

I’m working on a project where I’ll be inlaying the Dodgers logo into cherry, using colored epoxy. The whole logo will be around 6-8” wide.

My problem is the ball. The “Dodgers” I’ll be slowly and carefully routing out by hand. But I don’t trust myself doing the small round/circular parts by hand.

Can anyone illuminate me on how to route a tight curve, such as those found in line and berry inlay?


2 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#1 posted 08-18-2012 12:21 AM

Use the old popsickle stick and x-acto knife blade trick to
define the circle edges, then remove the waste.

That ball has 3 fulcrums and you can either make a tool
with 2 knives or use make 2 tools with 1 knife in each.

I am referring to a trammel with a scalpel blade, basically.

There are of course lots of ways to do it with router jigs but
a knife makes a cleaner edge and to make a knife trammel
is less laborious than a router jig. For one piece I’d go with
the trammel.

View DrGang's profile

DrGang

14 posts in 1569 days


#2 posted 08-23-2012 03:31 PM

In this instance, it seems to me that a router jig would not be that complicated. If your router has a round base, you could cut a disc in a piece of MDF of a diameter equal to your router base plus the ball’s diameter (you may want to consider your bit radius). You would then place the MDF on your wood, the router inside the hole and you’d just follow the edges of the hole.
For the ball “stitches”, you just have to shift the template and ride only a section of the hole edge.

If your router doesn’t have a round base, first make a round base and attach it to your router base with double-sided tape or screws, possibly using the hole you’ll cut from the template → less waste !

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com