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How many coats of Oil based GF ArmRSeal for dinning table?

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Forum topic by Stovall posted 707 days ago 1525 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Stovall

6 posts in 709 days


707 days ago

I’m new to finishing, but I thought I’d have a go at my wife’s dinning room table. I’ve been unable to identify the wood, but have ruled out oak. I started with two coats of GF gel stain, and now am ready to apply my third coat of GF ArmRSeal. My question, how many coats will it take to get a finish that withstand a hot cup of coffee, or cold glass of ice tea, without marring the finish? Is this even possible? Any advice would be great. Also, should I buff out with wax, if so, what kind. Thanks for a great forum….


8 replies so far

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CharlesNeil

1112 posts in 2467 days


#1 posted 707 days ago

the key to arm r seal or any finish is to get enough to look good, thats enough, contrary to poplar belief more isnt always better, typically 3 good wet coats will do, if your wiping on and off, thats a very thin coat, so maybe 5 , again, looks good is good, but 3 is a min for me, brushing, 5 if wiping, No finish will like hot coffee, of any single thing that will cloud and ruin a finish , heat is number one, ice cold drink, no issue, just watch the coffee,

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lumberjoe

2824 posts in 845 days


#2 posted 707 days ago

hey Stovall,
If I read correctly, you’ve already applied 3 coats of Arm-R-Seal? That should be plenty for protection, I would just be concerned with the quality of the finish. I would sand with really light sandpaper (800 grit +) or use some 0000 steel wool then put one more finish coat down. After that dries for at least 48 hours, ideally 72 hours gently buff it out with furniture paste wax applied with steel wool. Stay away from automotive and silicone based waxes. You can find good old Johnson’s everywhere, and that stuff is like gold to have around the shop anyway. Minwax also makes a finishing paste wax that is readily available almost everywhere as well. Once the wax hazes over, buff out with a thick lambswool pad. I usually wait a few hours and apply another coat. If there are still nibs/imperfections in the finish I use steel wool again. If not, the wax goes on with cheesecloth. Don’t build up a lot of wax though if it will get hot/wet.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Earlextech

900 posts in 1287 days


#3 posted 707 days ago

Three to four coats should be sufficient depending on the thickness/plastic look you are happy with. And I would absolutely finish it out with paste wax, let the finish cure for a week before waxing. Two coats of wax initially, I always wax anything that will be touched by skin on a regular basis.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

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Stovall

6 posts in 709 days


#4 posted 706 days ago

Thanks, guys, for the great advice. I have wiped on two coats so far, so I’ll give it another three lite coats, then apply the wax. I look forward to being a member of LumberJocks, what a great resource.

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CharlesNeil

1112 posts in 2467 days


#5 posted 706 days ago

I agree , no wax for at least a week or 10 days, other wise you can slow the cure of the finish, also often wax will streak on a new finish, this is becasue it still has some solvent in it, and it softens the wax, check out your local auto body store and get some finishers glaze also called swirl remover, its a wax of sorts, but is designed to be used with new finishes, but you dont need anything, also when its good and dry to help the feel buff it a little with a brown paper bag, helps give a buttery feel

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lumberjoe

2824 posts in 845 days


#6 posted 706 days ago

Charles, to remove swirls, I often use a product called PerfectIT II from 3M. I also use it to buff out automotive finishes after wet sanding. It’s a 3000 grit buffing compound. I have had OK results using it, but it is silicone based and I often wondered if it contaminates the finish, or will develop the “fish eye effect” that silicone based products have over time. Is there something specifically you would recommend?

Also your Pre-Color Conditioner is probably the best finishing related product I have ever used.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Stovall

6 posts in 709 days


#7 posted 706 days ago

More good advice, I understand now, how the curing process works,’and why it’s important to wait before applying wax. Knowing why something is helps me grasp the concept. Thanks guys…

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Earlextech

900 posts in 1287 days


#8 posted 706 days ago

I’ve buffed with brown paper bags for almost 30 years, it’s just one aspect of a “hand rubbed” finish, which I do with a spray gun.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

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