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Forum topic by bandit571 posted 739 days ago 1229 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bandit571

6825 posts in 1310 days


739 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: trick handsaw refurbishing

Hardware: Found a no-muss way to polish up some saw hardware…

The “before” picture. Supposed to to “Brass” (NOT!) and now the tricky part

Have the tools handy…

Chuck a part into the drill, and give it a spin into the purple scratchy pad. Slow speed, battery was low, today. Just hold the drill in one hand, and hold the scratchy pad against the chuck. The results…

( Brass? my ….) Nice and shiny, took about a minute to do. The set took maybe 15 minutes. A look at the set, in a saw handle…

Speaking of saw handles, prepped a few for sale, as users…

Early 50s WS saw. missing one bolt…

A second even newer one. Also a Warranted Superior. Next..

A No-16/D-16 (??) with a skew back blade. All are out on the “Drying Rack” after a coat of varnish. After they dry, I’ll go back and hit them with some steel wool. Haven’t sharpened any of them as yet….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use


16 replies so far

View jim C's profile

jim C

1452 posts in 1726 days


#1 posted 738 days ago

Beauties

-- When I was a boy, I was told "anyone can be President", now I'm beginning to believe it!

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3079 posts in 801 days


#2 posted 736 days ago

You did a great job in restoring those beauties!

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View NewbieToo's profile

NewbieToo

1 post in 1421 days


#3 posted 736 days ago

Outstanding! Good idea, it’s like having a miniature cratex wheel. I like the finish patina, it’s much nicer than dipping it in acid. When I confront a super rusty piece of metal, I tend to use pool acid instead of elbow grease. It works in a brute force kind of way but the results are flat. Pieces almost look galvanized, a matte look. Your way is better.

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10656 posts in 1634 days


#4 posted 736 days ago

Slick move for polishing those nuts. I will be using that method.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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mandatory66

95 posts in 758 days


#5 posted 734 days ago

Nice tip, I just did a few they were brass ( a lot easier to refurbish) thanks for a good idea.

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TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2303 days


#6 posted 734 days ago

What are purple scratchy pads?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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bandit571

6825 posts in 1310 days


#7 posted 734 days ago

Purple Scratchy Pads are from the 3M co. for sanding metal. I get mine at work, since we use them to clean the metal Injection molds. You can even get them at Walmart.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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bandit571

6825 posts in 1310 days


#8 posted 734 days ago

A few extra tips: Use a keyless chuck. You want it tight enough to hold the part, NOT crushing any threads on the part. Just tight it to keep it still.

The “Scratchy pads” work best for this when you hand hold them. One hand holds the drill, the other the pad. Keep the pad loose, to keep it from wrapping around a spinning part. For really badly rusted things, try a piece of Emery Cloth. Then finish up with the Purple pad. There are Green ones out there, they are a bit coarser grit, more scratch than polish.

Slow speed: You want to control things. No rush, it will do just fine. Even a medallion is a small part.

Medallions: Have a small stick, or a small bolt handy. Wrap some of the scratchy pad around it. You can use it to get it into the recessed areas. Don’t even need a drill, just rub around in there until it shines.

Slotted parts: The slot will grab things when it is spinning. Take a file, and remove any burrs that stick up. The Pads will grab onto any burrs. So will a fingertip. A swipe or two with a file will do wonders. The pad will remove the traces of the file work. When the rest is shiny, one can take a screwdriver tip, with some fine sandpaper on it, and clean the slot.

I have tried other ways to clean these small parts. Wire wheel, in a drill? Holding the part with a) fingers? NO removes fingerprints that way, or b) Visegrips? To hold a part securely, it has to be tight. Tight enough to ruin threads tight. Otherwise, part will fly away at the speed of a starship. Good luck finding it too. BTDT. Much easier,, and safer to chuck the part in the drill.

I have even used this tip to clean the bolts from the Handplanes I restore. Works very nicely, thank you.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View RS Woodworks's profile

RS Woodworks

464 posts in 1879 days


#9 posted 733 days ago

I prefer a fine wire brush. While I’m sure your method will work, you seriously risk loosing detail of the design in the medallion with the Scotchbrite pad method. Your removing material there. Thats a big issue if the saw is remotely collectable (pretty much all old Disstons and other popular makers).

-- I restore the finest vintage tools! If you need a nice plane, saw, marking tool or brace, please let me know!

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bandit571

6825 posts in 1310 days


#10 posted 733 days ago

If you are really worried about the Medallions, then use good old Brasso. The same stuff I used for over 20 years, shining my Army Brass items. I don’t press hard when doing the Medallions, just let them float along in the purple pad. It will shine the high points, leaving the low areas dark. A nice contrast. There is a Brasso made for steel, as well as other metals. Then you can just spin the Brasso coated part into a soft cloth to polish to a high shine. Belt buckles didn’t spin very well…....

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3079 posts in 801 days


#11 posted 732 days ago

Preserving the material’s details of the design should be a priority. The medallion’s worth is based on how it looks and if you loose material because of the scotchbrite pad it would look bad.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

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bandit571

6825 posts in 1310 days


#12 posted 732 days ago

I suppose that this latest Medallion is no good then???

This is an E.C. Atkins & Co. saw. I have shined up the Brass, but that is all i have done to this strange saw…

Would this be a Ship saw???? 21” long in the blade.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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Surfside

3079 posts in 801 days


#13 posted 732 days ago

Great job! The medallion shines like new! What’s a ship saw?

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View RS Woodworks's profile

RS Woodworks

464 posts in 1879 days


#14 posted 732 days ago

Looks fine to me Bandit, just not my prefered method. :)
That saw is just a regular panel saw, it’s just been sharpened so many times that it now comes to a point at the toe and the heel is below the handle. Any blade etch visible?

-- I restore the finest vintage tools! If you need a nice plane, saw, marking tool or brace, please let me know!

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bandit571

6825 posts in 1310 days


#15 posted 732 days ago

A very nice blade etch. Seems to fit just perfect on the blade, too. The medallion got a soak in some Citrius Mold Cleaner that I use at work on Injection Molds. Cleans a lot of the gunk off. It even works on saw blades, to float away rust. Soak them good, wipe off the mess, soak them again to get rid of any residue. I haven’t had any Brasso in the house since I retired from the Army.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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