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Forum topic by CudaDude posted 08-12-2012 12:50 PM 1071 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CudaDude

124 posts in 1060 days


08-12-2012 12:50 PM

I used my father in law’s 20” grizzly planer to surface some rough cut cedar i’m using in a project. Every board I planed would get somewhat of a thin peeling of the grain. At first I thought I may be feeding the boards against the grain, but it didn’t make a difference. Is this just a characteristic of cedar, or might it be the planer. BTW, the planer is functional, but is several years old and hasn’t been cared for all that well. Thanks.

Gary

-- Gary


19 replies so far

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ChuckV

2487 posts in 2279 days


#1 posted 08-12-2012 01:01 PM

Gary,

I’m not familiar with cedar. But, the first questions that come to mind are:
  • Are the blades sharp?
  • How deep of a cut are you taking?

-- “While the world with closed eyes sleeps, The sky knows and weeps - steel rain. ” ― Nathan Bell

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Gary

7615 posts in 2185 days


#2 posted 08-12-2012 01:15 PM

I plane cedar a good bit and don’t have that problem. Do other woods do the same thing?

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

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Handtooler

1134 posts in 884 days


#3 posted 08-12-2012 02:01 PM

I plane quite a bit of cypress taken off our house 25 years ago. It was put on in 1952. Quite often the real tall cathedrals of the grain in the center of the 6, 8, and 10” panels peal up or curl back for about 1/8-5/16” across the center portion. the outer grains don’t excperience this. I take very light cuts and many passes. The boards were sand blasted on the outer side to remove the softer grains and provide a roughened appearence. That was very poplar for interior ship lap 1” paneling back when it was first installed. I’d also like any suggestions toward preventing this as it takes a bit of sanding to 320 grit for a nice finish with poly. Russell

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@msn.com

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CudaDude

124 posts in 1060 days


#4 posted 08-12-2012 05:07 PM

Don’t think i’m taking very deep cuts (1/8”) The blades are probably not as sharp as they could be but it doesn’t do it on all woods. He’s made some cutting boards lately that did fine. But, i guess that may be because they’re made of a harder wood.

-- Gary

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Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist

5276 posts in 2060 days


#5 posted 08-12-2012 05:15 PM

1/8” is a fairly deep cut…especially if the planer has not been cared for all that well. I would try a finer cut and do a bit of maintenance on the planer. Planer blades can build up pitch ansd resin just as any blade or cutter will.

-- Each step of every Wood Art project I design and build is considered my masterpiece… because I want the finished product to reflect the quality and creativeness of my work

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Loren

7826 posts in 2400 days


#6 posted 08-12-2012 05:23 PM

1/8” is a hogging cut. A finishing cut is closer to 1/32”.

When you take a finishing cut sometimes it can help to
wipe the face of the board with a wet sponge. This
controls tearout, sometimes.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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CudaDude

124 posts in 1060 days


#7 posted 08-12-2012 05:33 PM

Well, I guess that might answer my question. I didn’t think 1/8 was that much. I’ll try a shallower cut and see what happens. Thanks.

-- Gary

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MonteCristo

2098 posts in 940 days


#8 posted 08-12-2012 05:58 PM

If your planer has a serrated feed roller, it may leave tracks on soft woods like cedar if the cut is very shallow (< 1/32” or so). This is why I also have a small 12” planer with a smooth feed roller.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2487 posts in 2279 days


#9 posted 08-12-2012 06:11 PM

I never take more than 1/16” at a time. Most often I take 1/32”, especially as I get close to my target thickness.

-- “While the world with closed eyes sleeps, The sky knows and weeps - steel rain. ” ― Nathan Bell

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gfadvm

11543 posts in 1442 days


#10 posted 08-13-2012 01:28 AM

If I understand your “peeling problem”, I have experienced the same thing when working with reclaimed old growth Douglas Fir. My problem only occurs on cathedral grain and is identical to what handtooler posted. I haven’t found an answer for my “peeling”. I usually apply a coat of shellac which worsens the peeling, then sand it back smooth and hope the shellac ‘glues’ the early and late growth together. It usually helps a lot.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Handtooler

1134 posts in 884 days


#11 posted 08-13-2012 09:03 AM

Many Thanks gfavdm! I’m glad I not erroring too badly. As I have a lot of this pretty, straight, colorful wood to use up, And, after planning to 3/4’ from a full 1” I’m psst the old gray or painted appearance and in to new yello and gold material. After sanding and pecan stain Poly it’s simply beautiful. Even the end grain shines brightly.

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@msn.com

View kizerpea's profile

kizerpea

746 posts in 1120 days


#12 posted 08-13-2012 09:23 AM

sounds like the wood is to dry…had that happen once…some old white pine..

-- IF YOUR NOT MAKING DUST...YOU ARE COLLECTING IT! SOUTH CAROLINA.

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Handtooler

1134 posts in 884 days


#13 posted 08-13-2012 10:39 AM

Very dry. Taken down from my inside house walls 25 years ago and stored inside since. Probably in the 6-8% range even in the humidity of TN. Russell

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@msn.com

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ajosephg

1860 posts in 2313 days


#14 posted 08-13-2012 10:46 AM

I’ve heard that giving the surface a light spray of water helps. (I’ve not tried it)

-- Joe

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Handtooler

1134 posts in 884 days


#15 posted 08-13-2012 11:04 AM

CudaDude, It’ll probably pay you to have a spare set of blades and keep the spare sharp,so that you can install a really nice sharp set, if and when, you get a nick or a dull situation in the middle of a project. Then resharpen or have sharpened the bad set at your leisure. I keep two sets foe both my jointer and Foley-Belsaw planer. Russell

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@msn.com

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