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Having trouble jointing on my jointer

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Forum topic by BerBer5985 posted 717 days ago 1455 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BerBer5985

420 posts in 1022 days


717 days ago

I have an old Craftsman 36” long jointer 6” wide. I’ve set all the knives with the one way jointer setup tool. When I do shorter pieces I don’t seem to have a problem, but longer thinner pieces, I have a hack of time getting them square. I’d love to upgrade the jointer at some point, but it’s driving me crazy that I can’t get pieces square quickly. Either the jointers not long enough, or my technique is not great. Thicker stock seems to work out ok, but thinner (like 3/4”) becomes very difficult for me. Any tips?

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com


19 replies so far

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Tomj

204 posts in 983 days


#1 posted 717 days ago

I’m just curious, is this a model 113 Craftsman Jointer? I have one of these. It was my fathers and he only used it twice. The second time he put a board with a screw or nail in it through the jointer and chipped one of the blades. I am in the process of restoring it. It has sat in the basement for over 15 years rusting away. Sorry I can’t offer any tips as I myself am still learning jointer technique. Good luck.

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Roger

14149 posts in 1405 days


#2 posted 717 days ago

I had one of these. I had to shim the fence with a playing card or 2 to get it square. You just gotta keep playin and tweekin it constantly. Save yer money and get a better jointer. That’s my 2-cents

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

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JJohnston

1577 posts in 1893 days


#3 posted 717 days ago

It could be that the boards have some warp to them, but because they’re thin, you’re flattening them out when you press them down onto the tables. They spring back after the cut, and they’re still warped. Is that what you mean?

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

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muleskinner

662 posts in 1038 days


#4 posted 717 days ago

I had an old Craftsman 4” jointer (also my fathers) that I had the same problem with. I determined it was my technique. The low height of the fence was such that I had trouble keeping wider boards perpendicular when edge jointing. I finally attached a wider board to the face of the fence that made it easier. My technique still sucked but the results improved.

-- Visualize whirled peas

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Alexandre

1417 posts in 792 days


#5 posted 717 days ago

Did you set the out feed table after changing the knives?

-- My terrible signature...

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

420 posts in 1022 days


#6 posted 717 days ago

I’m not sure the out feed table is adjustable. The knives are all perfectly square to the out feed table but it’s like my stock seems to be coming out much thinner on one end then the other. I’m not sure why. The fence is dead square to the table as well. Maybe the boards are that warped. It just doesn’t seem like its taking even amounts of stock off. I’m
In the process of trying to upgrade to a better jointer. I’d like one with a longer table for sure. This jointer I believe was made in the 1960s. It’s all solid cast iron. Including the stand. It’s heavy for its size.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

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muleskinner

662 posts in 1038 days


#7 posted 717 days ago

Greg, if you’re trying to get parallel edges with a jointer you’re in for a lot of frustration, at least I was until I figured out that the jointer was good for getting one flat edge and then paralleling (?) it up on a table saw or planer.

-- Visualize whirled peas

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

3837 posts in 930 days


#8 posted 717 days ago

post a pick of the jointer… there are several different models of old Craftsman jointers….. some better than others.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Handtooler

1055 posts in 733 days


#9 posted 717 days ago

Alexandre, The Craftsman jointers do not have an out feed table adjustment. Berber 595, Its necessary to install the blades such that when a small narrow board is placed across the infeed table, cutter head and out feed table; and the cutter head is rotated by hand. that as the blade comes in contact with the board it moves the board ahead about 1/2”. the height adjustment jig with the screw twisted out 21/2 turns, I believe is what the owners manual calls for, sets rhe blade height almost correctly. I finally got mine to stop snipe and joint edge and face correctly after I reset my blades this way having read a tip only last year. I purchased miine later 70’s.

And, yes I want to upgrade to an 8” machine with an adjustable out feed table and one with more HP.

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@msn.com

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BerBer5985

420 posts in 1022 days


#10 posted 717 days ago

Ok, here’s what I’ve got. I checked to see if the tables were coplanar, and from the measurements, they are. I also checked to see if maybe the knife holder was in line with both the infeed and outfeed tables and it’s within .004” off from left to right, but the knives are square to both. The knives are all reading .001-.002” above the outfeed table. The only thing I can think of if my technique is horrible, like I’m overpowering the wood while pushing it through and putting too much pressure, or I’m trying to joint too long of boards in a 36” long jointer, or the boards are just that twisted.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

View Tomj's profile

Tomj

204 posts in 983 days


#11 posted 716 days ago

Wish I could help but I’m still in the process of getting mine together. Mine is newer maybe 91-92, it’s a 113 206 932 Craftsman Jointer. Good luck.

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1577 posts in 1893 days


#12 posted 716 days ago

Jointers aren’t supposed to keep, or make, opposite faces parallel. What yours is doing is perfectly normal. All a jointer does is get one face flat, and one edge flat and square to the flat face. The planer makes opposite faces parallel. It’s normal that the more you joint a piece, the more of the taper effect you get. It will also taper side to side in addition to end to end.

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

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fussy

980 posts in 1652 days


#13 posted 716 days ago

What JJohnston and Mule Skinner said. A jointer will flatten one side and square one edge to that side. That’s all it will do except eat lumber and turn it into chips if you keep trying to make 4 square lumber on it. There’s nithing wrong with it. It’s just not meant to do what you are trying to do with it. That’s what planers are for. And you thought woodworking was going to be a CHEAP hobby?

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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Grandpa

3048 posts in 1277 days


#14 posted 716 days ago

What JJohnston said about making one side and edge straight. Then complete the job with a saw and a planer. I have a jointer similar to this one from the late ‘70’s. I had problems somewhat liek this when planeing the first edge. I ginally found that I had a knife that was not up to the outfeed table surface. I read about a technique that said to use a sharpening stone with a piece of paper around it.
Put the stone on the outfeed table and work the knives with it. This should leave the knives about .003 above the outfeed table and parallel to the table. Mine works well and has for years. It is a 6 inch jointer with a short table so keep that in mind. A Cheverolet doesn’t ride like a cadillac.

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

420 posts in 1022 days


#15 posted 713 days ago

I know that the jointer only flattens one side but it’s not even doing that. I’m kind of thinking the jointer might be underpowered. I found that after I set the knives on my old ryobi benchtop, I was getting better results. I’m not sure what the deal is. Im going to sell both here soon and buy a new one anyway, but I don’t think the knives are spinning at a high enough rpm and the motor is only 1/2 hp. I’m thinking that possibly part of the outfield table is not perfectly flat and I’m setting the knives to be even with either a low or high spot and it’s messing up the results. Who knows, all I know is that I’m frustrated with it. I was dimensioning stock by hand for a while and that’s just tiring, so I busted out the power machines for dimensioning stock only to leave frustrated. When it’s taking 15 mins on each board and eating away at the stock to leave me with just a flat edge, then it’s not worth it. It could also be the fact that it’s 3/4” stock of pine and it’s just bending under pressure and I’m just removing stock without fixing the defects. I’m sure it’s not all the jointers fault, but I’m sure there’s a lot that would be improved with a new machine.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

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