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Forum topic by Mark Shultz posted 08-07-2012 05:21 PM 3310 views 2 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark Shultz

62 posts in 1141 days


08-07-2012 05:21 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dust tip

I was pondering PVC vs flex tubing for my new dust collection, when i stumbled upon this product from home depot. it is called TripleWall, and i believe designed for drainage applications. It cost about $7 per 10ft section, which is way less expensive then flex or PVC. there are end caps, whye’s , T’s also. connections are friction fit. what makes it really nice is that a 4’ flex hose fits it very well (albeit a little tight) and also blast gates. there is a 6” version also but one may have to find a distributor.


10 replies so far

View JK0702's profile

JK0702

49 posts in 882 days


#1 posted 08-08-2012 10:38 PM

Mark-
I have been doing the mental gymnastics of a similar system for my shop. I just haven’t been able to work out the EXACT details. How did your project come out? Does it work well, any leaks? What would you do different? It’s important for my equipment to be mobile in my (garage) shop, so the flex tubing would give me that. I’m familiar with the triple wall, as I’ve used it before to house sprinkler lines under my newly poured driveway. A couple questions for you:

1. How did you anchor the triple wall, if at all
2. How did you transition to your dust collector
3. Do you have more pictures

Thanks,
John

-- John - Huntington Beach CA

View JK0702's profile

JK0702

49 posts in 882 days


#2 posted 08-08-2012 10:39 PM

Mark-
I have been doing the mental gymnastics of a similar system for my shop. I just haven’t been able to work out the EXACT details. How did your project come out? Does it work well, any leaks? What would you do different? It’s important for my equipment to be mobile in my (garage) shop, so the flex tubing would give me that. I’m familiar with the triple wall, as I’ve used it before to house sprinkler lines under my newly poured driveway. A couple questions for you:

1. How did you anchor the triple wall, if at all
2. How did you transition to your dust collector
3. Do you have more pictures

Thanks,
John

-- John - Huntington Beach CA

View whitebeast88's profile

whitebeast88

3602 posts in 941 days


#3 posted 08-09-2012 12:38 AM

mark thanks for the info on the triplewall.i’ve just purchased a dust collector and now trying to design the layout and decide on the most economical way to.

-- Marty.Athens,AL

View robdem's profile

robdem

337 posts in 1357 days


#4 posted 08-09-2012 12:53 AM

Mark I used the same material in my shop few months ago to set up my dust collector stuff works great . Only used flex hose to hook up to machines. I have the pipe running to my table saw jouner bandsaw sanders and a drop down by my bench for planer and router table also have a hook up for miter saw . I used foil tape on al lthe joints along with clamps and pvc adhesive no leaks in the system

View jimmyhopps's profile

jimmyhopps

149 posts in 1130 days


#5 posted 08-09-2012 02:02 AM

1 I didn’t anchor the tubes at all. they just run along by basement floor. I suppose whatever technique that works for other tubing would work here.

2 see photo for transition to the collector. The triplewall tube will fit snugly around the exit dust ports on my machines and on the dust collector, so you don’t need anything extra.

in this first photo, to the collector, i raise it off the floor with a couple of 45’s.

in the second photo, from my jointer, the tube connects directly to the out port and also the intake of the blast gate. totally friction fit. at the left of the photo you can see the 4” flex tubing fitting over the triplewall. this joint was a bit tight, but it is how i would recommend doing it. i alloted enough flex here so i could move my jointer around. the other end of the flex connects into a short piece of triplewall which goes directly into a whye joint and into the main system, which you can see in photo three.

photo three

none of these joints require any additional tape whatsoever. i did tape all the triplewall to triple wall joints as there is some minor gaps here which i don’t think material. but it was easy to do.

in the forth foto you see the ultimate cheap maneuver. here i attached some spare vaccume hose to an end segment of triplewall (the female fat end). this then fit into another whye. this is what i use to vacume the shop. i can take that out and put on the cap seen on the floor when not in use (could have used a blast gate if i had an extra). this is also the place where i plan to connect to my smaller tools.

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1819 days


#6 posted 08-09-2012 02:07 AM

Yes, the flex will be cheaper than any of the solid wall ducts, but you lose a lot of collection effeciency. Flow in smooth walled duct is much better than in a rough wall.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1505 posts in 1384 days


#7 posted 08-09-2012 03:15 AM

Thanks for pointing this out. The hose on my DC is getting pretty tattered. Triplewall should be a perfect replacement.

View jmos's profile

jmos

681 posts in 1120 days


#8 posted 08-09-2012 12:22 PM

Interesting product, haven’t seen it before. Have you put a vacuum on it; does it hold up well? Does it come in 6”? Is it smooth inside; it looks a bit irregular outside?

I’m in the process of installing DC in my shop as well. It took some looking but I finally found a mom & pop shop that had the thin walled PVC sewer and drain pipe, $18/10ft for 6”, still quite a bit more than this stuff.

-- John

View Mark Shultz's profile

Mark Shultz

62 posts in 1141 days


#9 posted 08-09-2012 01:24 PM

the company makes a 6” version, but HD does not stock it in my area.

it seems durable to me. will be under light wear relative to a drainage application.

the inner and outer wall are slightly undulating – not anything as rough as black irrigation tubing. the bumps are about 1/64” high each (i didn’t measure it). its been a while since my last aerodynamics course but i doubt there will be meaningful incremental drag over the distances a hobbyist would be using in their shop. the mfg may quote a Reynolds number if somebody wanted to research that a bit.

View jmos's profile

jmos

681 posts in 1120 days


#10 posted 08-09-2012 02:59 PM

Interesting. I’ll have to keep an eye out for the stuff.

The manufacturer might have a friction factor for the material, or a roughness; you would use one of those coefficients, along with the flow and the properties of the fluid, to calculate the Reynolds number.

-- John

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