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Has anyone made a grinder jig?

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Forum topic by Chardt posted 07-21-2008 09:46 PM 16944 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Chardt

169 posts in 3506 days


07-21-2008 09:46 PM

I have been looking at some of the bench grinder jigs, like the Veritas. It looks great, but I don’t really want to spend $60 for the basic tool rest, plus an additional $30 for the straight grind jig.

It doesn’t look like a complicated design, and I was wondering if anyone has made one, and if so would you be willing to share your design/experience, and any pitfalls I should watch out for.

Thanks!
-Carl

-- When my wife ask's what I have to show for my wood working hobby, I just show her the splinters.


10 replies so far

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Timber4fun

218 posts in 3505 days


#1 posted 07-21-2008 10:20 PM

What are you planning to grind/sharpen? I have a bench grinder, but it is very raw. I use it for mower blades and rough clean-up of metal objects. For chisels and plane blades, I just use a piece of plate glass (46 inches long by 10 inches wide) and some self-adhering sandpaper—80 grit, 120 grit, 320 grit. I then follow-up with 600 grit, 1000 grit, and 2000 grit. I end up with a very sharp blade. Cost is minimal and the process is extremely convenient and easy. Just pull out the glass with the sandpaper attached, clamp it down on the bench, and sharpen the blade. When the paper is all used up, peel it off and put some more on. The glass keeps the surface nice and flat. It works for me. Not sure I am helping you much with your question. It just depends on what you’re trying to accomplish. Others may have solid tricks for using a bench grinder.

-- Tim from Iowa City, IA

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Chardt

169 posts in 3506 days


#2 posted 07-21-2008 10:28 PM

I use that system as well, I have a piece of granite tile with sandpaper on it, as well as water stones, and the Worksharp system.

The bench grinder is really well suited to strip the rust and corrosion off of an old plane blade, as well as the chip breakers, and cap irons. Once they are shiny, then I proceed to the sandpaper, stones, etc.

I was looking for a better way to hold the blade steady. The tool rest that came with it, is about as useful as Paris Hilton as a U.N. rep.

-- When my wife ask's what I have to show for my wood working hobby, I just show her the splinters.

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Timber4fun

218 posts in 3505 days


#3 posted 07-21-2008 10:40 PM

Nice analogy.

-- Tim from Iowa City, IA

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ChuckM

600 posts in 3571 days


#4 posted 07-22-2008 04:23 AM

As you said, the designs are relatively simple. You can make your own tool rest and the grinding jig out of plywood. But don’t use the grinding wheels that come with your grinder if you are to sharpen chisels and gouges. Replace them with cool grinding wheels like these: http://tinyurl.com/644uka You can find them at LV, Woodcraft, Rockler, etc.

-- The time I enjoy wasting is not time wasted

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Chardt

169 posts in 3506 days


#5 posted 07-22-2008 06:53 AM

Thanks for that! I also read that you should never use the side of the grinding wheel. I understand not to use chisels or anything sharp, but what about using the flat of a plane blade to grind the rust, and corrosion off of it, I thought that would be ok, as there isn’t a stress point and its spreading the contact over a wide area.

..any thoughts on this?

-- When my wife ask's what I have to show for my wood working hobby, I just show her the splinters.

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Loren

9947 posts in 3552 days


#6 posted 07-23-2008 05:33 AM

My 3600 rpm grinder has a white wheel on it. As long
as I am careful I don’t burn the steel I put to it.

I threw away the rests that came with it. I mounted the
grinder to a piece of plywood. To the plywood I screwed two
blocks about 6” high. To the blocks I attached a length of
1/2” pipe, drilled on each end to be screwed to the blocks.

The top of the pipe is on the centerline of the grinder. I square
plane and chisel blades by hand, using a pocket square for
reference. When squared I grind a hollow bevel into the
blades by resting them on the pipe, using it as a fulcrum.

I waxed the pipe a while back. Blades slide smoothly on it.
I have a simple jig for sharpening plane irons with the pipe
tool rest but never use it.

After the bevel is ground I go to a 1200 grit water stone and
then to a buffing wheel or a 6000 grit stone.

I grind regular drill bits into brad-point bits using this tool-rest
and white wheel as well.

I didn’t invent this. I read an article by Ian Kirby in FWW several
years ago and his tool rest made sense so I built my own.

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Karson

35099 posts in 4305 days


#7 posted 07-23-2008 05:39 AM

Here is my sharpening station.

As i state there I’ve got all of the Veritas Jigs the Tormek Grinder, some Japanese stones, Some steel Plates that I use with a diamond paste.

And I designed this tool. It’s the one that I use all of the time and it’s cheap.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

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Chardt

169 posts in 3506 days


#8 posted 07-23-2008 06:21 AM

Thanks for all the replies! That is very helpful. I really appreciate it.

I’m looking forward to incorporating it into my setup.

-- When my wife ask's what I have to show for my wood working hobby, I just show her the splinters.

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

23552 posts in 3755 days


#9 posted 07-24-2008 11:20 AM

Chardt, I don’t know if you are a wood turner but there are grinding jigs you can make for your chisels.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

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rmac

206 posts in 2965 days


#10 posted 02-24-2011 07:39 AM

Looks like I’m about three years late to the party, but here.

—Russ

-- My table saw laughs at hot dogs. http://thesorteddetails.blogspot.com/

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