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Shop on Blocks VS Slab?

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Forum topic by psf513 posted 07-30-2012 08:12 PM 2131 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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psf513

5 posts in 2842 days


07-30-2012 08:12 PM

I am working on the design of a shop that is 16’ X 32”. Right now I am in a garage and do not have the room I need (want). I was planning to put it on a concrete slab but building code also requries 4 layers of cement blocks (hollow core is fine). The issue is the shop will cost almost $7,000 more on slab. Does anyone have a shop on “pier and beam”? If so, what are your biggest issues, complaints, etc.

Thanks
Pete

-- Pete If I had known grand kids were so much fun, I'd have gone straight to them.


11 replies so far

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chrisstef

15673 posts in 2472 days


#1 posted 07-30-2012 08:24 PM

Ive got a basement shop so i cant directly comment but i would imagine that with putting heavy machinery on the floor it may want to sag unless you have laid out your shop prior to construction and reinforce the floor joists. Rot and moisture will be another serious issue. $7k is a good chunk of change … i might be able to deal with the downfalls for that kinda cash.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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Doss

779 posts in 1730 days


#2 posted 07-30-2012 08:40 PM

$7000 more would be a hard pill for me to swallow if I weren’t making enough money to justify that sort of investment. That’s a lot of new tools and/or wood.

If properly constructed, a conventional foundation for a shop floor should be just as good as a slab (in theory). If you’re using really, really heavy equipment, it may not be advised though.

What type of machinery and inventory (wood, supplies, etc.) do you plan on storing in your shop?

The bonuses are that wood floors are generally more forgiving to you and your tools, stays warmer in the winter (usually), and is constructed pretty fast.

Plus, if you damage it, you could possibly repair it. Also, you could possibly level the foundation if you are on ground that moves a lot.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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psf513

5 posts in 2842 days


#3 posted 07-30-2012 10:53 PM

I guess I would say I have the typical tools: table saw, bandsaw, 2 lathes (small and medium), planer, jointer, scroll saw, workbench, toolboxes, shopvac and dust collector, and a ShopSmith. As to wood supplies, most of my turning stock is in my shed (likely part of it will move), a small to medium amount of boards, some rough cut maple, and a few odds and ends. I am hoping to store wood either overhead or on a wood rack hung from wall studs.

-- Pete If I had known grand kids were so much fun, I'd have gone straight to them.

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Loren

8313 posts in 3113 days


#4 posted 07-30-2012 10:58 PM

A wood floor is real nice to have in a wood shop.

You don’t seem to have real heavy machinery and that’s
a concern if you get into collecting Old American Iron.

Some guys like a wood floor because you can cut a hole
in it and fit a 36” bandsaw into the shop and have the
table at waist level.

You can also run dust collection under the floor.

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psf513

5 posts in 2842 days


#5 posted 07-31-2012 12:02 AM

Great suggestions.

THANKS

Pete

-- Pete If I had known grand kids were so much fun, I'd have gone straight to them.

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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#6 posted 08-15-2012 06:31 AM

I would prefer pier and beam in any case. It gives you options for running electrical, water or dust collection underneath and you don’t have that cold (winter)/hot (summer), hard concrete slab under your feet as you work. If you want to change things around it’s much easier. Just talk to the contractor and tell him your concerns about equipment weight. Another concern is bracing the joists properly so they don’t bounce from the vibration of running equipment.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Doss

779 posts in 1730 days


#7 posted 08-15-2012 03:16 PM

Another concern is bracing the joists properly so they don’t bounce from the vibration of running equipment.

Glue and screw everything you can. And yes, make sure the foundation is constructed to take the weight of your equipment, your supplies, and, of course, you.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

View Emma Walker's profile

Emma Walker

560 posts in 1576 days


#8 posted 08-15-2012 03:29 PM

I want to build a 10×10 shed for storing lumber. I want to build it on blocks so I don’t have to get a permit because it’s not considered a permanent structure.

-- I'm a twisted 2x4 in a pile of straight lumber.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#9 posted 08-15-2012 04:03 PM

I agree with Wormil
As a contractor I know you can build a wood floor you can park a semi truck on if it’s built properly. If your crawl space is high enough to crawl through ,and it should be with four 8” blocks you can run air,dust collection and power all under the floor and be able to relocate and equipment in the future. I’m really surprised a concrete floor is that much more expensive ,it sounds like your contractor doesn’t want to do a concrete floor so he made the price super high.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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woodenwarrior

203 posts in 1660 days


#10 posted 08-15-2012 04:08 PM

The final question begs itself…Which one will you be happier with? As my Dad likes to say, “You buy it once”. I understand the cost involved but if you you won’t be completely happy with the alternative, then $7000 is money well spent in my opinion.

-- Do or do not...there is no try - Master Yoda

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psf513

5 posts in 2842 days


#11 posted 08-16-2012 04:22 PM

Good questions and suggestions. I guess I still have some thinking to do before I layout the cash.

THANKS EVERYONE

-- Pete If I had known grand kids were so much fun, I'd have gone straight to them.

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