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Stanley 192: anybody use one?

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Forum topic by Brett posted 626 days ago 780 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brett

615 posts in 1183 days


626 days ago

Has anyone used a Stanley 192 (or similar) rabbet plane? How well do they work?

-- More tools, fewer machines.


7 replies so far

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chrisstef

9354 posts in 1506 days


#1 posted 626 days ago

I use the #78 for rabbeting. I find it a little difficult to maintain a square edge as the fence is tough to see through the plane. I run my finger against the fence while planing and can keep it pretty square that way. A super sharp iron makes a ton of difference.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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sikrap

968 posts in 1859 days


#2 posted 626 days ago

IIRC, the 192 is a dado plane, not a rabbet plane. You could certainly use it for a rabbet, but it won’t have the fence. I use a 78 for rabbets and I love mine. That’s probably why I have about 10 of ‘em :))

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

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Brett

615 posts in 1183 days


#3 posted 626 days ago

sikrap, do you have vintage 78s (um, planes not records) or newer ones? Do the older ones work better than new ones (assuming they’re properly tuned, etc.)?

-- More tools, fewer machines.

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chrisstef

9354 posts in 1506 days


#4 posted 626 days ago

My 78 is early … id say the 30’s. Tuning one up is pretty easy to due considering there isnt much metal to be removed to make all the parts flat and square. You just have to make sure you have all the parts most of the time the fence or depth stop is missing. There is also a “nib” that scores the cut line. Luckily mine came with all the parts and pieces.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Don W's profile

Don W

13924 posts in 1067 days


#5 posted 626 days ago

I’ve got both a Stanley and a Millers Falls 78 (not sure of the MF #). They both work well. If you buy a vintage, just make sure it has the fence, rod and depth stop. They are all pretty important.

-- There is nothing like the sound of a well tuned hand plane. - http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com (timetestedtools at hotmail dot c0m)

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sikrap

968 posts in 1859 days


#6 posted 625 days ago

Hey Brett, I have both the “newer” and “older”. The biggest difference is that the newer ones have a lever for adjusting the blade depth and the older ones require tapping with a hammer. When I say “newer”, I do not mean that they were made recently, only that they have the adjuster lever. I must admit that I find the adjustment lever nice to use. If you’re in the market, PM me and we can talk. I agree with Don about the fence and depth stop, especially the depth stop. Once you get the hang of these planes, they are a LOT of fun to use.

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

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Loren

6746 posts in 2147 days


#7 posted 625 days ago

I had one for awhile. They are useful for working in grooves and
can sort of substitute for a shoulder plane in a pinch as I recall.

The best rabbet planes I’ve used are the 10 1/2 and the 289.

The #46 combo plane can be got for not too much and it will
work as a skew rabbet and as a dado plane.

I don’t have either anymore… they were too tempting to sell
due to their collectable values.

I now have an antique Japanese wood skew rabbet I got for like
$30 on ebay – has a fence and it works well. Still I never use it.

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