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8" Dado on a 1.5 HP Contractor's Saw

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Forum topic by jstewart posted 05-06-2007 08:30 AM 2270 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jstewart

141 posts in 4174 days


05-06-2007 08:30 AM

Topic tags/keywords: dado

I am in the market for a dado set for my 1.5 HP contractor’s saw. I saw a user review of a blade over on Amazon. The review warned of burning out underpowered motors with 8” dado sets. It basically said that people with saws with less than 2 HP should only get 6” dado sets.

What do you guys think of this?

-- Joshua, Olathe, Kansas


10 replies so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13754 posts in 4180 days


#1 posted 05-06-2007 03:15 PM

Well, if your married, I would find a project she wants that required dados. I woud then use this information to justify the purchase of a cabinet saw. Another approach would be to actually burn out the moter while making her something. : ^)

Actually, I’ve not heard the burning out part. I would imagine that you would have to be careful and make the cut in several passes similar to using a router. Also, you may want to check the length of your Arbor. Your 1 1/2 horse motor may not be able to accept the full stack.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1780 posts in 4173 days


#2 posted 05-06-2007 03:59 PM

I am facing the same dillema. If you are keeping the saw for a while buy the 6”. 90% of your dado’s are going to be under 3/4 deep and less than 3/4 wide.

Think about what you are going to make.
Cabinets? 1/4 or 1/2” cuts.
Tenons? mostly 1/4” to 1/2” deep. Wide as possible to save time.

I have made up my mind for you. Buy a higher quality 6” and let us know what you got.

In my opinion, making several passes for depth is a pain unless you have a reliable way to set a depth/height stop as with a plunge router. You have to run all of the stock at setting one. Raise the bit or blade. Repeat. Repeat. etc.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke."

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4563 posts in 4393 days


#3 posted 05-06-2007 06:33 PM

If not several passes, you will have to slow your feed rate to a point where it does not stain your motor and overload your circuit. I agree with gizmodyne, get the 6” and get a good one that will make clean cuts for you, no wobble type.

-- Jesus is Lord!

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USCJeff

1063 posts in 4151 days


#4 posted 05-06-2007 09:12 PM

I have not heard about your situation. Mine is 3HP so I might have just ignored it. I’m with Wayne, burn it up building something for your wife. My personal preference is to use my router for dado cuts. This is mostly due to the fact I don’t like changing my TS blade. I have my router mounted to the TS. I use the TS fence as a guide. Good luck.

-- Jeff, South Carolina

View jstewart's profile

jstewart

141 posts in 4174 days


#5 posted 05-06-2007 09:20 PM

I want to be able to do some mortise and tenon joinery as well as some frame and panel case construction. The projects I would like to duplicate are…
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/916
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/1254
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/1067
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/1275
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/566

I guess I can accomplish the mortise and tenon work with my friend’s tenoning jig (or the one I hope to buy). I can do rabbets with my router and some nice bits. The grooves for the frame and panel construction could be done with a standard blade and multiple passes, right?

This seems like the cheapest solution both because I don’t have to buy a dado and because I don’t have to buy a new motor after overworking mine.

I’ll still consider a 6” dado in the future. Right now I think I’ll see what I can accomplish without it.

-- Joshua, Olathe, Kansas

View USCJeff's profile

USCJeff

1063 posts in 4151 days


#6 posted 05-06-2007 09:32 PM

You’re right in that you can do what you mentioned using jigs and multiple cuts. I raised panel jig for my table saw I built and have had decent results. My router (DW618) isn’t powerful enough to get decent results with that bit that big so I use my TS. I have seen plans for adjustable raised panel jigs and they look great. Mine is same, but it isn’t adjustable. There is more sanding needed on a TS, but it isn’t bad. You might have to use a cove bit or something if you want to put a profile or lip in the middle of the panel.

My brother in law and I argue about his Tenoning Jig he bought for $100. I used it. I’ll take my jig any day of the week over spending money on his jig. It was nice. No problems. It just didn’t do anything better than a simple shop built jig. Somebody posted a NICE jig a week or so ago. Can’t remember who. It was one of the regulars on the boards. It was very elaborate, but looked cool. Mine just rides the fence, holds the piece perpindicular, and has a toggle clamp on board to secure the piece.

-- Jeff, South Carolina

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jstewart

141 posts in 4174 days


#7 posted 05-06-2007 09:53 PM

When I said “frame and panel” construction, I should have mentioned that I like flat panels. I don’t plan on doing any raised panels (since like yours, my router wouldn’t cut it).

-- Joshua, Olathe, Kansas

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1780 posts in 4173 days


#8 posted 05-07-2007 04:17 PM

I still prefer to dado on the tablesaw. Once you get quick at changing the blades. If I had a setup where the fence was shared by the router table maybe I would change my mind.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a 6” dado set for Joshua and me?

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke."

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

1010 posts in 4176 days


#9 posted 05-08-2007 05:38 AM

Hey guys. I have one of the Freud 6” Super Dado sets. It’ a great set but not cheap. I’ve never had a problem with it on my Delta 1 3/4 hp hybrid. I have never cut anything deeper than 3/8 to 1/2 in one pass either. My feed rate was great. I used it to make the finger joints on my projects completed so far and it whips through maple and padauk like it was pine. It comes with a great chart that shows every combination possible and has a good set of metal shims. There is also a DVD but I think it was more a sales pitch for their dial-a-width dado set. Regardless, I’m very happy with it.

-- Jeff, St. Paul, MN

View Ethan Sincox's profile

Ethan Sincox

767 posts in 4256 days


#10 posted 05-08-2007 06:03 AM

After using a less-expensive ($50) 8” dado set in my 1.5 HP Contractor TS for about two years now, I can honestly say I’ve never had a problem to speak of.

Lately, as far as technique goes, I aim for just a touch too thick on my tenons and a bit too shallow on my dados and then clean them up with a few passes from my bull nose plane.

-- Ethan, http://thekiltedwoodworker.com

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