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Wagner HVLP gun

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Forum topic by BentheViking posted 07-25-2012 04:28 PM 1610 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BentheViking

1755 posts in 1315 days


07-25-2012 04:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing spray gun question

Someone gave me one of these. Instructions say to only use it outside and not to use with latex products. I am about to buy a house and will be renovating the entire thing. Would I be crazy to try and use this tool to paint my walls and ceilings? I can open up a ton of windows to get a good amount of cross ventilation.

If I choose not to use this for this project has anyone used one to spray woodworking projects? What kind of results did you get?

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson


11 replies so far

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 1015 days


#1 posted 07-25-2012 04:44 PM

Which Wagner is it? Do you have a picture?

I used the Paint Crew one, but it’s an entirely different type of sprayer than the HVLP ones.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

2044 posts in 1244 days


#2 posted 07-25-2012 04:44 PM

I have that and use it frequently to spray lacquer, waterbornes, and shellac. It’s possible (maybe) to get the projector set to spay latex (these guys have parts for it), but yes, I think it would be crazy to do what you suggest. If you really want to paint the whole house buy on of the airless latex sprayers and use it…sell it later after your done. Or just roll it on….BTW, if the ceilings are textured and you choose to roll them, be sure to prime with an oil based primer first. Latex paints can loosen the crap and then it falls off, or sticks to the roller or does other PITA things.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Lifesaver2000's profile

Lifesaver2000

524 posts in 1863 days


#3 posted 07-25-2012 04:53 PM

Wagner makes a few different HVLP units. I have the “Control Spray Plus” which uses a small turbine connected by a 20’ hose to a spray gun. They also make a self-contained HVLP sprayer where the motor is on the back of the gun.

I have the first one, the Control Spray Plus, and have used it for water and solvent based polyurethane. It does fine, although it seemed to do better with the water-based poly. It is pretty easy to clean and gets the job done fast. The last four of my projects that I have on here were finished with it.

It comes with a viscosity cup, so it might be possible to thin latex down to where it would work, but I haven’t tried it.

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BentheViking

1755 posts in 1315 days


#4 posted 07-25-2012 04:54 PM

This is it here. After reading the Amazon reviews I decided that maybe it can work to spray latex, maybe not, but that regardless its just too slow to do a house like I would attempt. I was hoping for a quick and easy alternative. The only time I’ve used HVLP was in a custom millshop with a few grand spraying rig and an 80 gallon 220v compressor with separators and regulators throughout the line. Not quite apples and apples. Maybe more like apples and applejacks.

Fred, thanks for the tip, but we are actually starting by water blasting and scraping all the texture off of the ceiling first (my uncle is a sheetrock contractor and is lending a hand).

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1819 days


#5 posted 07-25-2012 05:37 PM

Are you sure it’s an HVLP? I used to have a Wagner airless that was pretty worthless – and really bad with latex.

There should be a model/serial number on it somewhere. The Wagner website should have the manuals.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 1015 days


#6 posted 07-25-2012 06:48 PM

Ben, I know this doesn’t help much since you already have the gun, but I used this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Wagner-Power-Products-515000-Sprayer/dp/B00009YUHK/ref=sr_1_9?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1343241623&sr=1-9&keywords=wagner+crew

That thing can lay down some paint fast.

The problem you’ll run into with a sprayer like the one you have (besides the tip) is how often you’ll need to refill it on any large job. I would consider painting a room or furniture with it, but not a house exterior.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1755 posts in 1315 days


#7 posted 07-25-2012 07:10 PM

kerf, I have the manual and it as well as the box says HVLP all over it

Doss I am painting the interior, not the exterior, so your product may work, I just don’t know if its heavy duty enough or worth the cost to buy it to paint an entire interior.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View Lifesaver2000's profile

Lifesaver2000

524 posts in 1863 days


#8 posted 07-25-2012 07:43 PM

If you aren’t locked in to the idea of spraying, there is another option. About 12 years ago I did an addition to my house, and at the time I purchased a Wagner Power Roller. It ran on batteries, and the reservoir held almost a gallon of paint. I used it first to apply a full five gallon bucket of primer to the walls and ceilings throughout the addition, then to paint the ceilings, and finally to paint the main room of the addition. For smaller areas like a bathroom it was easier to just use a conventional roller and pan.

The power roller makes fast work of large areas. I went through that five gallons of primer in no time, compared to a roller and pan. Once you get the hang of it you can paint as fast as you can roll, and get a nice heavy, even coat. The paint I used was suppose to dry four hours between coats. During that time, I simply dropped the whole thing into a garbage sack and tied it up to keep out the air instead of having to clean it between coats of the same paint.

The worst drawback of the thing is the cleanup. That is why it is only worth using it for large areas.

As far as your HVLP gun, that is not the unit I have but the spraying part looks similar. I really like mine for what I use it for, so hopefully yours will do well on any woodworking projects you have later on.

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

1760 posts in 1178 days


#9 posted 07-25-2012 07:53 PM

I use a Capspray 9100 four stage turbine, I also mix Flowtrol 20% with house paint PVA water base (see my project cabinet)
The results were fairly good but labour intensive with all the masking. Careful brushing is almost the same in my opinion.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

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BentheViking

1755 posts in 1315 days


#10 posted 07-25-2012 07:54 PM

I think my wife actually picked up one of the power rollers at a yard sale for a few bucks. I was a bit skeptical about it being more of a gadget than a tool, and since I’ve had experience spraying I felt more comfortable doing that. After your recommendation I’d better go give the roller manual a once over and hopefully it will do us well. We are only doing a few colors throughout the house so hopefully we can bang it out without too much cleaning.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 1015 days


#11 posted 07-25-2012 07:57 PM

I realize you’re painting the interior, but that is little info for me to know how much you’re painting? 1 wall? 15 rooms? I should have clarified further, if you are are spraying a large project such as the exterior of a house or if you are painting multiple rooms the same color in a 1500+ sq ft house, I’d use the Crew one I linked above. The clean up time on that system is a little lengthy, but the time it takes to get coverage is almost nothing. You can spray at any angle and can get multiple tips to fit your application. It can also accept a roller attachment.

If you are painting 1 room or doing a lot of color changes on small projects, your system will work fine. I’m not sure how it’s going to work on ceilings though. In fact, the reviews on Amazon say it doesn’t really work on horizontal surfaces which I’m guessing is an issue of the feed. Others on there say that latex paint has to be thinned very heavily.

Just some additional info for you.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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