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Forum topic by lumberjoe posted 738 days ago 2832 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lumberjoe

2829 posts in 853 days


738 days ago

My wife and I love going to flea markets and craft shows. We don’t buy a lot, but get a lot of ideas for things to make for our home. Save for some old circular saws and pipe wrenches, there are never used tools. Except yesterday. There was a guy there with a lot of hand planes. One that caught my eye was a Stanley/Bailey #6. I looked like it was in OK condition, but I could not figure out if it really was or not. He only wanted 10 bucks for it and I should have just taken it.

Where should I look for resources on:
1 – learning the general functionality of hand planes
and 2 – Learning to assess the condition and operability of used planes.

I am not looking to collect and resell, I want to use them. There is a lot of info here, but it is scattered in a lot of different LENGTHY threads and tough to piece together.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts


24 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10441 posts in 1611 days


#1 posted 738 days ago

Go out and buy Garret Hack’s book on handplane … i think its called the Handplane Book … its got it all.

Most of the time if it has all the parts and pieces it can be made to work again. Check the mouth of the plane for chips and crack. A malfunction there will render most a pain to work with. Pitting on the sole and edge of the iron is another to look out for. Not a huge deal but worth noting.

You missed the boat on the #6 …. you hsould haev taken it. I did the same with a #8 years ago, $20 and i let it pass by …. oh well.

IMO, you dont need the cats ass of planes, most can be made to work and work well. Some just take more time than others.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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lumberjoe

2829 posts in 853 days


#2 posted 738 days ago

I did look at the sole. There were no cracks or or chips near the mouth. It wasn’t pitted and only had a little surface rust that would have worked out with sandpaper.The blade was very rusty, but looked like I could put an edge on it with the worksharp. No big gouges or cracks. If it’s still there next weekend I may grab it. It’s a huge flea market and we are actually going to set up a booth. It’s only 25$ for the day. I don’t have anything I made to sell, plus I still kind of suck and I doubt anyone would buy it :)
We have tons of old crap that is going in a dumpster that we saw people actually buying. If we could get a couple bucks for it, so be it.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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chrisstef

10441 posts in 1611 days


#3 posted 738 days ago

The way i see it Joe, if you bump into one with all the parts for 5-10 bucks buy it. For the price of a starbucks coffee its worth it even if its a learning experience.

You seem to be a lot like myself, the only way i learn things is to take it all apart and put it back together again. Hand planes are no exception. Youre first tune up will garner a lot of new information and reasoning as to why they work and what makes them work.

Worksharp tip——try and get all the rust off the iron with sandpaper before putting it on the worksharp. It would have saved me a bunch of $$ in that darn worksharp sandpaper. The rust just prematurely wastes the paper.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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b2rtch

4289 posts in 1653 days


#4 posted 738 days ago

Chris Schwartz also has very good books about hand planes and hand tools in general.

-- Bert

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LukieB

921 posts in 935 days


#5 posted 738 days ago

Check out Patrick Leach’s Blood And Gore, an amazing Stanley/Bailey handplane resource. Years or research compiled in one nicely organized place.
http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0a.html

And yeah, you shoulda bought the #6 :)

-- Lucas, "Someday woodworks will be my real job, until then, there's this http://www.melbrownfarmsupply.com"

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lumberjoe

2829 posts in 853 days


#6 posted 738 days ago

I have an electrolysis set up I used for car parts. I’d get the rust off that way. If it was REALLY bad I could have my friend soda blast it as well. If he still has it next weekend, I’ll grab it.

He also had a gigantic plane labeled “Bedrock 607C” for 35$. that was in really good condition but I’m not sure what I would use it for. It was about 2 feet long

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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chrisstef

10441 posts in 1611 days


#7 posted 738 days ago

AHHHHHH … go back now! The bedrock design is a pretty sought after one and they didnt make them for very long, maybe 15- 20 years (guess here). The 607C is probably worth around $100 all cleaned up. Its a great plane for flattening large areas and also used to joint board edges. The “C” is a corrugated sole … which i think was a gimmick to lessen the drag on the plane as it slid over the wood.

This is gonna be like your first hit of crack Joe …. youll never be the same again lol.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Brett's profile

Brett

620 posts in 1288 days


#8 posted 738 days ago

EvapoRust is a good product for removing rust from old tools. It’s pricey ($9/qt or $30/gal, online), but it can be reused multiple times. If you don’t want to make an electrolysis setup, EvapoRust a good solution.

-- More tools, fewer machines.

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lumberjoe

2829 posts in 853 days


#9 posted 738 days ago

I have an electrolysis set up, although I haven’t used it in a long time and moved about a year ago. I think I still have everything.
Lucas, that link is perfect! Thanks

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Brett

620 posts in 1288 days


#10 posted 738 days ago

Sorry, lumberjoe, I didn’t see your post that mentioned your electrolysis setup. My bad.

-- More tools, fewer machines.

View JayT's profile

JayT

2114 posts in 816 days


#11 posted 738 days ago

If the Bedrock 607C is original and complete, that price is ridiculously cheap. Bedrock lever caps go for more than $35 on e-bay.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View hhhopks's profile

hhhopks

561 posts in 982 days


#12 posted 738 days ago

$10.00 for a good condition Stanley #6????

I will buy a not so good (say fair) Stanley #6 (assuming it is not a Bedrock) just for the parts.
The knob, tote is well worth that. Just make sure that it doesn’t have the plastic knob & handles.

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

View Newage Neanderthal's profile

Newage Neanderthal

190 posts in 1155 days


#13 posted 738 days ago

At first glance it might seem trolling to say you found a good condition 607 for $35, because its seemly seems to good to be real. But I am assuming that it is, in which case, go back and by both as soon as possible. get there when it first opens, and buy up any other deals. I know you said your looking for users, but at those prices you could go home, put them on ebay and make enough to buy some more. but I would keep them if i was you

-- www.newageneanderthal.blogspot.com . @NANeanderthal on twitter

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lumberjoe

2829 posts in 853 days


#14 posted 738 days ago

I’m honestly not that into reselling. It’s a lot of work that I just don’t have time for. The only thing I thought was “Man, that’s huge and heavy, what the heck would I ever use that for”. If he still has it next weekend, I may pick it up and play with it. I’ve never heard of a “Bedrock” plane so I didn’t give it a second glance. Also the correlated bottom is something I have never seen either on a hand plane. I assumed it was a defect

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Loren's profile

Loren

7276 posts in 2253 days


#15 posted 738 days ago

Iron bench planes are pretty easy to assess. You just check for cracks
in the casting and make sure all the metal parts are there. Knobs
and totes can be repaired or replaced easily, but unless you want to
play tinkertoys with planes, don’t buy ones that are missing any
parts except knobs, totes and blades.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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