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Inset door stop. How do you mount it so the doors close flush with the frame with door bumpers?

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Forum topic by noone posted 723 days ago 2146 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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noone

410 posts in 859 days


723 days ago

Silly question, but how do you mount an inset door stop to the back top of the 3/4” face frame so the doors close flush with the frame with door bumpers? Just glue it to the bottom of the countertop set back 1/16” from the back of the face frame? If I secure it flush to the back of the face frame, the doors will be 1/16” proud of the face frame at the top due to the bumper thickness.


10 replies so far

View jmos's profile

jmos

681 posts in 956 days


#1 posted 723 days ago

I would just skip the bumper and use a small block of wood as a stop, or you could make a 1/16” notch in the stop so that the bumper is flush with the inside of the face frame. As long as the stop is out of the way, pretty much anything works.

Ball catches also work to keep the door closed and aligned without needing the stop. Although, if you have kids who might push the door in too far you might want the stop anyway to keep the stress off the hinges.

-- John

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noone

410 posts in 859 days


#2 posted 723 days ago

I was planning on using a small block of wood for the stop, I was just wondering what the easiest way was to accommodate for the 1/16” thickness of the round clear bumpers I will have in the top corner of each door. I’d rather not have to rabbet a 1/16” deep notch, but if that’s what you all do, then that’s what I’ll do.

I’m looking for suggestions on how to set the wood block back 1/16”.

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jmos

681 posts in 956 days


#3 posted 723 days ago

Are you using spring loaded hinges? If not, I really don’t see much benefit in using the bumper.

Another option if you’re not using spring loaded hinges is putting in a catch, witch will also act as a stop.

-- John

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noone

410 posts in 859 days


#4 posted 723 days ago

I’m using Salice soft closing euro hinges. Are you saying to not use the bumpers on the door and just let the wood close against the wood stop? Seems like this would scratch things up somewhat over years of use.

View cutmantom's profile

cutmantom

269 posts in 1622 days


#5 posted 723 days ago

i have made stops likes this by rabetting a longer piece of wood and then cutting off the length of stop i want, you could just use a 1/16 shim to get the space you want, also you could rabbet a little deeper and coutersink a screw to give you an adjustable stop

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jmos

681 posts in 956 days


#6 posted 723 days ago

I’m with you, with spring hinges I can see using the bumpers, not so much for scratching, but for the banging noise when it closes.

I’d go back to relieving the stop block; you could use a forstner bit to remove the 1/16”, just get a good grip on the stop with a pliers while drilling, or use hand tools. A band saw can also work safely. I would not try to rabbet with a router or TS on a small piece. If you want to go with a router or TS, make a larger piece you can easily control, then cut off what you need.

Alternately, just add glue on a 1/16” spacer piece to the stop block (you’ve got to have some cut off lying around, right?) to make the step.

-- John

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Wdwerker

331 posts in 820 days


#7 posted 723 days ago

Make a length of wood with a 1/16 th rabbet down one edge the width of your bumpers. Then cut into smaller blocks to provide the stop. I would put one in the upper and lower corner of the opening. Then you can adjust the hinges to get a flat and solidly supported door when shut.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1556 days


#8 posted 723 days ago

Make a wooden stop block with slots for the screws, use pan head screws and you will have all the adjustment you need.
Alternatively, use a nail-in plastic shelf support, put the door in position with the buffer on the door and simply nail it in place.

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1655 days


#9 posted 722 days ago

I’ve done several cabs with inset doors recently and just glue/brad a small block at the top to stop the doors. I use the small, felt, stick on bumpers and they eliminate the closing noise while compressing enough to not worry about the alignment of the doors.

Since perfectly flush alignment is usually not possible, I like to put a small (1/16”) round over or chamfer on the door edges and cabinet frame. This makes those small but annoying variations unnoticeable.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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noone

410 posts in 859 days


#10 posted 722 days ago

It sounds like a couple of counter sunk screws should do the trick while giving me a little adjustability.

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