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Finishing Oak

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Forum topic by SteveGaskins posted 761 days ago 650 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SteveGaskins

245 posts in 1212 days


761 days ago

I’ve recently refinished a large conference table with Original Waterlox. I love the finish, but on the darker sections of wood within the oak the table feels rough and not silky smooth like the lighter sections of the oak wood. I’ve read in past articles you can utilize some sort of wood or grain filler to fill the porous dark portions of oak before applying the finish.

Do you LJs have any informtion concering this wood/grain filler and how to apply?

Thanks in advanced for your comments.

-- Steve, South Carolina, http://www.finewoodworkingofsc.com


7 replies so far

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1693 days


#1 posted 761 days ago

The porosity of oak varies a lot as you move across the grain. Filling the pores is a good way to even things up, but it’s usually done before you stain/finish. Might be a real adventure trying it afterward.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1594 days


#2 posted 761 days ago

I’m just wondering if the rough patches you’ve got have occurred because of grain raising with the waterbased finish. If you have a reasonable size offcut of the oak, you could try putting the same amount of finish on it, wait till it’s dry, then squeegee on more of the finish (by squeegee, I mean get a good wet coat on it and then drag a clean, straight edge over the top leaving the wet finish in the depressions at the level of the surface) – wait till that is fully dry, if there are still low spots in it, do it again until you have leveled it all over, wait for that to dry and give a final sanding and coat the whole lot again. I’ve done this with great success before, but best try on an offcut first.
I used an old planer knife for the squeegee that was lying around.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1161 posts in 1484 days


#3 posted 761 days ago

Steve,

Most likely what you’ve heard of is a product known as “paste wood filler” which can be used to fill the pores of open grained woods such as oak and mahogany.

It normally consists of fine particles of silica suspended in a liquid, generally an oil. You applly a coat to the bare wood surface, let it sit a while so the liquid can evaporate and then clean the excess from the surface with a squegee or rough cloth. The trick is to fill the pores without leaving any on the surface. Once you’ve applied the filler to your satisfaction, seal it with a varnish or laquer to seal the surface.

The method described by renners is another way to fix the problem and may be your best course of action since you’ve already applied a coat of finish.

Good Luck!

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Gerald Thompson's profile

Gerald Thompson

356 posts in 859 days


#4 posted 761 days ago

Waterlox is not water based.

-- Jerry

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1594 days


#5 posted 761 days ago

Oh, I thought the clue was in the name. If it’s solvent based, it should work even better.

View Gerald Thompson's profile

Gerald Thompson

356 posts in 859 days


#6 posted 761 days ago

Steve;
Depending on the depth of the rough grain you might try adding more coats of varnish to the areas. I did this on an area of a project and it worked. Waterlox can be brushed. It is best to use a good black bristle brush. They hold more product. One has to wait 24 hrs to reapply and no sanding is needed between coats for adhesion.
I use Waterlox a lot and I like it. I don’t know about your brushing talents so you could do a Web search and learn about brushing technique, tipping off, etc.

-- Jerry

View SteveGaskins's profile

SteveGaskins

245 posts in 1212 days


#7 posted 760 days ago

Thanks so much for your input. I knew I would get good feedback from your guys. Thanks LJs.

-- Steve, South Carolina, http://www.finewoodworkingofsc.com

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