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Chess board repair advice

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Forum topic by Tokolosi posted 07-17-2012 03:33 PM 1199 views 1 time favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tokolosi

672 posts in 1075 days


07-17-2012 03:33 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question resource mahogany maple finishing refurbishing

A colleague recently moved to San Diego from Oklahoma. He brought with him a chess board that was made for him as a gift. It is curly maple and mahogany with bubinga inlays. A few months after arriving in San Diego the board cracked. Presumably from the lower humidity.

It has three fairly large cracks that goes through the entire thickness of the board. They range from 1/16” – 1/8” in width. He asked if I could try and repair it. There is no way the cracks can be forced shut. At this point I can think if two ways to make repairs;

1) Mask the cracks and fill them with clear epoxy.

2) Make or use a wood filler to match the maple and mahogany and re-finish entire board.

Im leaning to the the epoxy as it will be the least destructive and fastest way. If you have any other ideas I would love to hear them.

Thanks

-- “There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” ~ JRR Tolkien


6 replies so far

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1259 posts in 1346 days


#1 posted 07-17-2012 03:38 PM

I would inlay some bubinga through the cracks to cover them just large enough to hide the cracks. Similar to what I’ve been doing with my lids. Then I would fill the rest of the crack with epoxy to ensure a good bond. It will make the board much “busier” but it’s the only way I can think to hide them without it looking like a repair. If you wanted to add a little flair, you could miter each intersection as I did in my box “Spalted”. It takes a bit of time, but it’s fairly easy once you saw is set.

Hope this gives you some ideas.

Joey

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

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JoeyG

1259 posts in 1346 days


#2 posted 07-17-2012 03:46 PM

I left it out, but I would do each line in the board.

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

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Brandon

4145 posts in 1672 days


#3 posted 07-17-2012 04:28 PM

You can mix the epoxy with mahogany or maple saw dust to blend it better.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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Tokolosi

672 posts in 1075 days


#4 posted 07-17-2012 07:07 PM

Joey: I discussed your idea of creating additional inlays but he would like to keep the board as original as possible. It was made for him by his best friend. Good idea though. Lateral thinking!

Brandon: Thats a good idea. I will experiment with that a little. If you have done this before is their a good ratio of sawdust to epoxy I should use. I’ve used epoxy and other similiar products quite a lot but never have I added anything to it.

Ps. Looks like this is going full circle Joey. ;-) With the addatives to the epoxy.

-- “There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” ~ JRR Tolkien

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JoeyG

1259 posts in 1346 days


#5 posted 07-17-2012 07:11 PM

I haven’t used very much saw dust in epoxy. I know others on here have. The one think I learned in the little I have done it that the finer the dust the better the finish. Good luck with solving this. I look forward to seeing what you are able to come up with.

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

View Ed Pirnik's profile

Ed Pirnik

83 posts in 1551 days


#6 posted 07-18-2012 05:09 PM

If it were me, I’d probably tint some two-part epoxy with powdered dye to match the affected chess squares. Looks to me like the board was glued up with solid wood, as opposed to veneers. Therein lies the problem in the first place:)

Good luck! I’ve had lots of luck tinting epoxy. I often tint it black and use it to fill occlusions in cherry – very nice effect once it’s been scraped flush, sanded a bit, and finished. Highlights the natural imperfections int he wood in a very pleasing way.

Best to you,
Ed

-- Ed Pirnik, Fine Woodworking Web Producer

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