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Norton Sharpening stone issue

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Forum topic by Luke posted 774 days ago 1005 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Luke

538 posts in 1927 days


774 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: norton water stones sharpening not flat

I picked up the norton water sharpening kit today and started to flatten the stones with the included flattening stone, the one with the diagonal grooves in it. Here is what the 8000 looks like when I start with pencil lines drawn on it and when I’ve done as much flattening as my arms can take.

It seems to be really out of flat. You can see where the pencil lines are still on the outside edges in places. Needless to say my results were not spectacular. The 1000 was almost as bad but flattened out mostly. I think I’m going to be flattening this 8000 for a rather long time. Is this acceptable or should I keep on until it is really completely flat? Also, would a diamond flattening plate work any faster or better than the stone flattener? The 220 and 4000 were super flat and really easy to level out. The 1000 even needs more work so that my tools come out flat, especially when flattening the back of my blades and chisels.
Also on another note but in the same vein. If I was to want something that came completely flat and ready to go out of the box is there a brand that would?

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com


11 replies so far

View jmos's profile

jmos

681 posts in 1003 days


#1 posted 774 days ago

Unfortunately I’ve had bad luck with Norton stones being flat out of the box, none of mine have been. Some were very out of flat. I had one where one edge was a lot lower than the rest of the stone; I just used the rest of the stone and kept flattening until that edge finally came flat. It took quite some time for that to happen in that case.

You can use the stone as it is, as long as you only use the parts you know are flat. The good news about the 8000 is that once it is flat, it takes a lot to get it out of flat. The 1000 you need to watch more closely as they will dish as you use it. The 220 can really go out fast if you’re working the 220 hard, which you tend to since you only need that grit to shape edges that have some significant defect.

-- John

View Alexandre's profile

Alexandre

1417 posts in 824 days


#2 posted 774 days ago

The DMT-Diamond extra corse flattening stone is supposed to flatten stones pretty quickly.

-- My terrible signature...

View Gerald Thompson's profile

Gerald Thompson

361 posts in 868 days


#3 posted 774 days ago

I used a concrete block to flatten the Norton flattening stone. It has to be re-flattened from time to time.

-- Jerry

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1599 posts in 2095 days


#4 posted 774 days ago

Are you sure the flattening stone is flat? Lay a straight edge across both the flattening stone and the sharpening stone.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

738 posts in 1490 days


#5 posted 774 days ago

I am with Alexandre on this one. I have the 8000, 4000, and 1000 water stones along with a DMT XC plate. It does a good job flattening the water stones. On top of that the DMT is great for re grinding bevels and flattening the backs of irons and chisels.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View Loren's profile

Loren

7431 posts in 2281 days


#6 posted 774 days ago

It is acceptable. Don’t worry about it. Stones are for
honing edges, not surfacing metal surfaces. When you
lap the back of chisels and plane irons you’ll work far harder
than you need to if you try to get the whole back
flat and polished. Only about 3/4” back from the edge
is good – no need to rub the back of the blade over the
whole stone. The back just needs to be flat enough
that it doesn’t rock on the stone when you want to
polish it so you can bring that leading edge on the
back up to the same polish as the bevel – in your case
8000 grit.

In terms or honing bevels, a figure-8 pattern is ideal as
it distributes wear evenly.

If you want to flatten your stones fast, lay a drywall
screen on a flat surface and grind them down.

The flattening stone you have may be useful in removing
glazing, but I just use a nagura stone and that helps
prevent glazing in the first place.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2282 days


#7 posted 774 days ago

I think you’re done… you seem to have enough flat area to hone blades, don’t forget -as you hone blades you will need to reflatten your stone- so over time you’ll address those edges of the stone anyways.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

738 posts in 1490 days


#8 posted 774 days ago

I forgot to mention..

I only keep one side of the stones flat for polishing and honing. Once the backs are flat and polished I leave them alone and don’t use a micro bevel. The other side is used the old school way to free hand a quick edge in the tools from time to time, then a quick strop.

Picked this up from fellow LJ Paul Sellers. He has some good videos on the subject of sharpening in my opinion.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View Alexandre's profile

Alexandre

1417 posts in 824 days


#9 posted 774 days ago

Maybe 80 grit wet/dry sandpaper on a flat surface will work.

-- My terrible signature...

View Luke's profile

Luke

538 posts in 1927 days


#10 posted 774 days ago

UPDATE:
I took some 220 grit on top of a granite surface plate and wet sanded them both down. The 8000 grit went down in just a few strokes. The 1000 grit seems so be so much harder. I tried some 150 grit too and that did the trick. I think I may have to recheck everything after a few sharpenings but this seemed to do the trick.
@Loren:
I get what your saying I’ll def. keep that in mind. I was trying to flatten just the last 3/4” of blade on the back but it only wanted to hit the part that didn’t need flattening i.e. past the last 1/16”. I think it’s because that was sticking up due to the slight convexness of the stone along the short edge. I’ll try again soon and let yall know if it goes any better.

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

View jmos's profile

jmos

681 posts in 1003 days


#11 posted 774 days ago

Luke, I also use a granite reference plate to flatten. I use 220 grit wet/dry for 220/1000/4000 grit stones, and 400 grit for the 8000. Read somewhere that 400 was better so as not to get the 220 grit transferred from the paper to the stone. For initial flattening I too would use whatever works, but you might want to give the 8000 a few quick strokes on a finer grit.

I’m also a fan of the ruler trick and a microbevel on the back. Lie-Nielsen has some youtube videos on sharpening and they sell a David Charlesworth video that I really liked. I don’t sharpen enough to trust myself to sharpen freehand, but if you can develop the skill it would be the way to go.

-- John

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