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Rockwell 28-3x0

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Forum topic by troyercar00 posted 07-14-2012 03:45 PM 3355 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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troyercar00

21 posts in 1642 days


07-14-2012 03:45 PM

Hi all, I know that I dont talk much here, but I do really love this site. I am on most every day, looking at all the beautiful projects and checking on all the great tips from all the jocks. My question is this, I have a chance at a Rockwell 28-3×0 band saw, looking on the web, I believe it is 20”. It is a 3 phase 2hp motor, I asked around to some local people about changing the motor to a regular 110 or better yet, a 220 motor, they said it would be more expensive than just a converter. I have not heard this run yet but it looks like it is in very good shape. He wants $500.00 for it as is, I believe it is a good price from what I have seen online. Do any of you out there know how good this machine is and if it is worth the price with a converter, also do the converters work good and last? I do plan on hearing it run, he said no problem on that. I also do not do much work with a band saw, yet, just thought that this price was really good. Wanted to know if this would be the last band saw purchase for many years. I could get pics if needed, but will have to get my wife to do so. (I am no good with all this new technology) Thank you all in advance!


13 replies so far

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chrisstef

11482 posts in 1760 days


#1 posted 07-14-2012 03:57 PM

I cant imagine that a 3hp 220v motor would cost as much as a phase converter, but i could be wrong. I dont know much about the machine but at 20” i highly doubt you will find a need for a bigger machine. It sounds like a bargain in my book. I bet if you poke around craigslist in your area youll find a motor cheap enough. You may have to get new pulleys depending on the speed.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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waho6o9

5304 posts in 1330 days


#2 posted 07-14-2012 04:00 PM

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waho6o9

5304 posts in 1330 days


#3 posted 07-14-2012 04:02 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/39315

An interesting discussion on this thread and I hope it’s applicable to your situation troyercar00.

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troyercar00

21 posts in 1642 days


#4 posted 07-14-2012 04:53 PM

Thanks, I will look into these alternatives, appreciate you info.

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AHuxley

208 posts in 2075 days


#5 posted 07-14-2012 05:38 PM

A 2hp Teco FM50 VFD should run just over $150, you then will have the ability to have soft start and motor braking along with other functions.

The 28-3X0 is the later square version of the 28-350 20” bandsaw. The X indicates it was sold to the government, most often school systems. This is a solid saw, I use the older 28-350 as a contour cutting saw. It has about 13” of resaw under the guides and about 12” under the guard. It weighs a little under 700# and is welded steel, they along with the competing PM81 were sold to give small cabinets shops and (mainly) schools a low cost alternative to the large cast iron saws of the day. They have foot brakes that often are non-operational but it is usually just the lining, the OEM lining can still be sourced but it is expensive the best option is relining it with friction material available from Macmaster-Carr or other industrial supplies, enough to line it a couple of times is less then $15. Tires run over $100 a set as I am 99% sure they use the T-lock safety type tire, Iturra designs carries them. The only thing I really dislike about the 28-3X0 is the guides, most of them shipped with a rather unique plate guide system and it is rare to find one with a full set of plates and I don’t know of a source for the originals, some people either make or have them made but the general solution is to replace them with Carter 2000 series guides, roughly $200. Those saws in plug and play condition run about 500-700 bucks, though you will see a lot of people asking for significantly more. At $500 buy-in figure to have a good running saw that will run on single phase for a little under $1,000 when it is all said and done. Also if you want a fence usually the used ones do not have a fence, either it has been discarded or it may not have been ordered with one, if this is the case add money for that.

In the end they are a very solid saw for the money, they sell for less than the Powermatic 81 and are almost as good of a saw. When you can get one rehabbed into excellent shape for 1,000-1,200 they are an excellent value compared to what is available new.

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troyercar00

21 posts in 1642 days


#6 posted 07-14-2012 06:19 PM

AHuxley: Thank you for all that great input, I have been looking at the VFD’s since it was brought up by waho6o9. What you have mentioned makes me a little more confortable with it, didnt know what kind of rehab may be needed.

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Bill White

3589 posts in 2714 days


#7 posted 07-14-2012 07:48 PM

Don’t forget about needed blades, possible bearing rehab, etc. Is the table in good condition?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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troyercar00

21 posts in 1642 days


#8 posted 07-14-2012 10:40 PM

Yes Bill, I did a fairly good once over and found it to be in very good shape, been used a bit but in good shape considering. I know all the little things are going to add up, but with all machinery new or used there is always extras that you need. I just wonder if this is something that will be worth the total when I finish or if just saving and buying new would be better, in my past experiences, the old machinery is built far superior to any new stuff and thinking that this machine should last as long as I need. Thanks again for all the input.

Kevin

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cabmaker

1311 posts in 1562 days


#9 posted 07-25-2012 01:02 AM

Kevin that is the saw I have. when I shut down my commercial operation I bought a 19 inch grizz. I thought I was getting a replacement. To make a long story short, I sold the grizz and the 28-3×0 is back in its spot. Mine has always been single phase. It also (as mentioned ) has the J-plate guides. They can be a little fussy but are pretty quick to set up, and bombproof. I have never had problems with the foot brake but it is of such a design that lends itself to easy repair if neccessary. I hope you got it at that price !JB

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troyercar00

21 posts in 1642 days


#10 posted 07-25-2012 02:00 PM

cabmaker: I have yet to purchase, but probably will about middle of August. I thank you for your input, that is what I was looking for, knowing that if I purchase this it will be my last one (knock on wood) and will be worth going through and rebuilding. I know nothing about bandsaws, and did not want to get in over my head. Thanks again for all the responses and great information, making my purchase easier.

Kevin

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AHuxley

208 posts in 2075 days


#11 posted 07-25-2012 09:20 PM

@Troy you state “I just wonder if this is something that will be worth the total when I finish or if just saving and buying new would be better, in my past experiences, the old machinery is built far superior to any new stuff and thinking that this machine should last as long as I need.”

Just for clarification you can buy new bandsaws that are built significantly better than the 28-3X0. As I stated I have a 28-350 and it sits a few feet away from a “new”, built in the last 5 years, bandsaw which is superior to the older Delta saws in every way. Delta along with PM and Walker Turner were “light weight” manufacturers and although they are very good in todays terms there were real heavyweights made that were much better in the past and also better designed and built machines being produced today. The difference is cost. The price of a new 20” bandsaw which is superior to the 28-3X0 is going to top $3,000 and in most cases be closer to $4,000. There are actually very few old machines you can’t buy a new machine that is equal or better than but often the prices start looking like car prices instead of what we as hobbists think of as machine prices. Don’t get me wrong I love the price/performance balance of these old Delta 20” saws but they were the lightest and least expensive of the 20” saws of there era.

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therookie

887 posts in 1581 days


#12 posted 07-25-2012 09:24 PM

I encourage you to switch over to a single phase motor you wont regret it. It will one make the machine more desirable to others if you decide to sell it. The motors are not that bad depending on what brand you go with. For example and TEFC or totally enclosed fan cooled marathon 7.5hp motor brand new is just shy of $500. Now compare that to a phase converter.

-- http://aewoodworks.webs.com

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troyercar00

21 posts in 1642 days


#13 posted 07-27-2012 12:07 PM

Thank you all for such great input, will take everything into consideration before making purchase. A lot of great insight here so now I can go into this with a little more confidence.
Again thank you all!

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