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Need help from an Engineer for a Dust Collection Idea

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Forum topic by Dallas posted 07-13-2012 11:34 PM 845 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dallas

2925 posts in 1145 days


07-13-2012 11:34 PM

I don’t want to go into too much detail, but would like some ideas on an oil bath oil filtration system.

Are there any air flow engineers that would be willing to connect with me and tell me I’m ready for the self hugging padded jacket?

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!


8 replies so far

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 922 days


#1 posted 07-15-2012 04:31 AM

I’m not an air flow engineer(?), but I am an engineer (software). Before you discount that, I did study mechanical engineering until that job market took a beating (I have 30 hours to complete to get my degree ~1 year in mech. eng.).

Shoot me a PM and I’ll at least look at it.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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Dallas

2925 posts in 1145 days


#2 posted 07-15-2012 01:16 PM

Doss, Wilco, after I can drag the wife back from the big city this afternoon.

Have I mentioned that I hate going to any large city? Especially those with more than one stop light.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3457 posts in 2618 days


#3 posted 07-15-2012 02:47 PM

If I remember correctly, there was a home vac that used water as a containment medium. That was a LONG time ago.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View crank49's profile

crank49

3434 posts in 1628 days


#4 posted 07-15-2012 03:24 PM

Are you wanting to filter oil?
Or use oil to filter air?
Huge difference.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2925 posts in 1145 days


#5 posted 07-15-2012 06:17 PM

Michael, It would be doing both. I have the oil filtration taken care of, now to figure the needs of the system for handling air.

Bill, years before that vacum, heavy equipment was working in severe service environments using oil bath air filters.
For instance, I have a 1952 GMC parlor coach with a 671 Detroit Diesel engine. at 600 rpm it draws 150CFM through 3 oil bath filters.

Paper filters weren’t even considered in diesel equipment until the advent of the turbo engines.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View crank49's profile

crank49

3434 posts in 1628 days


#6 posted 07-15-2012 06:50 PM

For what it’s worth, in my 40 years experience with a whole range of fiters for many different purposes, the only time an engineer will resort to a wet filtration system is as a last resort given the media and system choices available today.

True, truck and car engines used to have oil bath air fiters, but because that was a cheap solution, not because it did any better job than dry filters. If you got some oil mist past the filter, no big problem. It helped lube the valves and got burned in the combustion chamber anyway. Of course, there was no concern for the increased air polution back in the 1940s either. They also had crankcases that vented directly to atmosphere. Things have changed.

I have installed wet (water based) scrubbers for foundry grinding dust collection. The water was handy for this because it extinguished the hot sparks coming from the fettling operation. Bag and cartridge filters would do a better job, but tend to burn up frequently in this application. Finally, the EPA got to be such a pain in the ass to deal with on the sludge discharge from wet scrubbers we shifted to high effeciency cyclones.

About the only place I know of where liquid scrubbers are used today are for systems with acidic or caustic characteristics and the scrubbers are used to neutralize or balance the ph. Power plant emissions containing acid from burning coal, for instance, are processed through scrubbers flooded with lime slurry to neutralize the sulfur dioxide gas. As a fringe benefit, the lime is converted into gypsum in this process and is sold to sheetrock manufacturers.

At any rate, if you are thinking about using oil to filter wood dust I think you would be creating a huge fire hazard. Unless your intent is to make wood dust/oil fuel.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2925 posts in 1145 days


#7 posted 07-15-2012 07:54 PM

Actually, that’s exactly where I’m going.

Part of the basic plan is to run the dusty air through oil bath filters with steel media above. The air intake has to run through the oil, in this case used motor oil that is constantly being pumped through into a catchment.

If and when the oil is pulled up into the media, dust will stick to it, (the media). That will increase the filtration capabilities. When the media becomes to full and starts blocking air flow, simply remove the media container and wash it or burn it out if you are in such a place that allows it.

By the way, all though I’m not an engineer, my credentials do include credited course studies in liquid filtration, as relating to automotive engines and air compressors. I know enough about airflow to ask some good questions, but not enough to know the answers.

Here, we aren’t talking about industrial applications, just something Harry Homeowner can use to keep his better half happy, and maybe keep his lungs working for a bit longer.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View crank49's profile

crank49

3434 posts in 1628 days


#8 posted 07-17-2012 12:40 AM

I think you are going to have some serious hydrocarbon fumes and a odor coming into your shop from that setup. Perhaps worse than the odor, you may also have carbon monoxide and benzene and a great assortment of other nasties being evaporated into your shop. If I just had to have a fluid based wood dust collector it would definately be water based; not oil.

The only advantage to oil based wet collector would be that you would never have to worry about your tools rusting. The condensed oil dripping from the ceiling sould keep everything lubed up nicely.

Seriously, you could probably make a system that would burn the exhaust coming from an oil based wet scrubber. You do not want to breath this stuff.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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