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fixing a shop floor?

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Forum topic by Beginningwoodworker posted 07-12-2012 02:14 PM 1190 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


07-12-2012 02:14 PM

A woodworker on another fourm remended that I jack up the shed agian and add 4×6 treated lumber on top of the blocks to support my weak unlevel shop floor is that a good idea?


17 replies so far

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1974 days


#1 posted 07-12-2012 02:28 PM

There should be some sort of beam system between the blocks and the floor, and with tools, preferrably 12” centers. Here in the South, many houses have crawl spaces, and most of those are standard floor truss construction on top of wooden beams or wood jackplates supported by pillers of block, brick or occasionally concrete. You also should definitely think somehow of putting a plastic barrier between the ground and the floor. On the dirt is fine, as long as it keeps dampness away from the wood and rainwater runoff cannot get on top of it.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1836 days


#2 posted 07-12-2012 02:55 PM

That would definitely help a weak floor but might not fix the unlevelness. It depends on whats under there now and why it’s not level. more info would help.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


#3 posted 07-12-2012 03:03 PM

Yes some of the floor joists are rotting!

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


#4 posted 07-12-2012 03:06 PM

The floor joists are 2 foot on center, and I have my 10’’ Unisaw on the floor. I original had built it on the ground but I jack it up but did not help the weak floor.

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OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1836 days


#5 posted 07-12-2012 03:14 PM

2ft on center is really far. I would suggest 1 of 2 things. Of course replace the rotting joists. then you could add more joists to make them 1ft on center or you could glue and screw down another layer of 3/4 t&g plywood perpendicular to what is down now. Be sure the screws go all the way down into the joists.

What size joists and how far apart are they supported?

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


#6 posted 07-12-2012 03:26 PM

2×6’x10 feet running 12 feet across.

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OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1836 days


#7 posted 07-12-2012 03:49 PM

2×6 shouldn’t span more than 8 ft. If you can get another support in the middle to cut the span in half that would be the best.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#8 posted 07-12-2012 03:56 PM

sorry to disagree but 2’ on center is fine as long as you put three 4×6” beem supports on each end and the middle of your span, that’s only a 4’ span .With 3/4” flooring you will be fine Charles. I would also replace the rotting joist with pressure treated wood.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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jack1

2057 posts in 3487 days


#9 posted 07-12-2012 05:55 PM

Also, if you can get under the floor, you might also shim the low spots to help level. Lots of work but worth it in the long run. Just my two cents…

Jack

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

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OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1836 days


#10 posted 07-12-2012 07:34 PM

no disagreement here Jim IF he gets the support beam down the middle of his span which is what i said would be best after having that information. And IF he is using 3/4 plywood for the floor.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


#11 posted 07-12-2012 10:27 PM

I will be installing a 3/4’’ Untily Oak or a Pine floor.

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#12 posted 07-12-2012 11:17 PM

OJM
Sorry to repeat what you already said us old guys miss things sometimes :))

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1947 days


#13 posted 07-12-2012 11:48 PM

CJIII,

If you have an OSB subfloor you’ll be asking for problems putting an oak or pine floor on top of it. I use OSB for many things, sub floor included, but the weight of your saw is going to cause it to sag at the pressure points.
If it were me, and I were determined to keep the saw in the same place, I would reinforce the floor there, and replace the rest of the subfloor with 3/4” exterior T&G plywood.

Final thought: build for the weight, not the wallet.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


#14 posted 07-13-2012 12:00 AM

I currenly have a 3/4’’ CDX subfloor.

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1947 days


#15 posted 07-13-2012 12:22 AM

I don’t know what model Unisaw you have, but that thing is going to weigh upwards of 500 to 700 pounds.

It needs to be supported solidly.

You can’t expect 3/4 CDX to support that much weight in 4 square feet. Especially if the feet of the saw are not on the joists. Add to that the rot and you have a big problem.

Joists and posts should never touch the concrete, or have any other connection to moisture. When I built and sold storage sheds and yard barns I poured my own concrete blocks with metal supports in them to connect to the joists, keeping the wood away from the moisture.

Yup, my sheds were more expensive but some of them are still being used 30 years later with no problems.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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