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Forum topic by DaveDelo posted 07-07-2012 07:44 PM 1541 views 1 time favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DaveDelo

86 posts in 2354 days


07-07-2012 07:44 PM

A friend asked me to make a few cabinets for the house he’s moving into. Kitchen is storage poor but what’s there is not that old and in decent enough condition. He wants me to match up to the existing cabinets the best I can so I went over there this morning to scope out the job and ran into a cabinet door construction method I haven’t seen before.

Doors are 3/4” thick but looks as if 2 (two) 3/8” thick pieces have been face glued together with an overlap design. I’m not crazy about doing it this way but I guess it might be kind of easy making doors like this without any joinery.

Individual pieces are random width from 2”+ to 4”+ and top edges have a roundover. Sort of creates a beadboard or fluted effect. Is there such a thing as beadboard cabinet door?

I have enough rough sawn oak on hand to complete the job but was thinking it might be faster/easier to buy some unfinshed oak flooring planks and just rip the tongues & grooves off and start from that point. However, I’m not sure if that type of flooring comes in anything less than 1/2”. Guess I could use the planer to get down to 3/8” but wanted to see if anyone had a suggestion or better way to do it.


6 replies so far

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Ted

2785 posts in 1671 days


#1 posted 07-07-2012 07:54 PM

You can buy 3/8” thick Oak T&G beadboard. It’s used all the time for wainscotting. Only problem I see is the random widths – the stuff you buy will all be the same width. But it might be available in random widths, I’ve never shopped for it so I wouldn’t know for sure.

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.

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DaveDelo

86 posts in 2354 days


#2 posted 07-08-2012 12:16 PM

Thanks for the input.

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Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2528 days


#3 posted 07-08-2012 01:32 PM

That looks like a typical half-overlay door. They’re made with 3/4” rails and stiles which get milled to give a 3/8” x 3/8” rabbet around the perimeter. You’ll need “offset” hinges to hang them.

I’ve made them using cope and stick frames with 1/2” stock for the panels with a 1/4” x 3/8” rabbet which let the panel front be 1/4” inside the frame. Yours look like T&G construction with the “panels” flush with the frame.

They shuldn’t be too hard to make, but you’re looking at a fair bit of milling to get the T&G parts.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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BentheViking

1763 posts in 2024 days


#4 posted 07-09-2012 01:32 AM

Its not too common to find unfinished flooring in less than a 3/4” thickness. You could also resaw it down to the thinner thickness rather than having to plane it all down.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

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DaveDelo

86 posts in 2354 days


#5 posted 07-09-2012 02:01 AM

I’ll be looking this week to see what the options are for beginning with flooring planks. Start thin and get 1 piece or maybe start thick & re-saw to get 2 pieces out of each plank…......I don’t know yet.

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Ted

2785 posts in 1671 days


#6 posted 07-09-2012 04:30 AM

You won’t get 2 pieces for a couple of reasons—the saw curf will take out a fair amount of the wood so they won’t be 3/8”, and because the underside of flooring has a recess cut into it. Also, the tongue and groove are in the center. Just a couple of things to consider.

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.

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