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Perfect inside corners... How??

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Forum topic by DanoP posted 07-07-2012 04:44 AM 1457 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DanoP

135 posts in 1093 days


07-07-2012 04:44 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

So… I’m trying to build my box making skills and I can get really nice mitered corners but find myself baffled trying to clean up the inside corners. Even taping and slitting the joints, I still find myself spending way too much time cutting, scraping and sanding that tiny bead of glue. Anyone out there have a good method for good CLEAN glue joints on small boxes? While I’m at it, how about sanding and buffing all the way to the edge in those bottom corners. I’d love for the insides of my work to look as nice as the outside.

Thanks in advance for your help.
Dano P.

-- We've got enough youth. Let's search for a fountain of smart.


14 replies so far

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KnickKnack

994 posts in 2320 days


#1 posted 07-07-2012 07:04 AM

I’m no expert but, as soon as the thing is glued up and clamped, I scape off those glue beads with a (fairly blunt) chisel while they’re still wet – that gets off a lot of it. And I’ve glued sandpaper (I use 180 for the insides) onto plywood to give me strips that can more easily get into those nooks and crannies.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

View Tedster's profile

Tedster

2290 posts in 965 days


#2 posted 07-07-2012 07:20 AM

I try to keep the glue more toward the outer edge. If any glue oozes out on the inside I clean it up right away with a wet rag, making sure to get all of it. I often use a putty knife to get the rag well into the corner, especially where it meets the bottom.

Once I’m sure I got all the excess glue out, I use a dry rag or rub it with some saw dust to dry it. The water raises the grain, but I would rather sand a little raised grain than sanding glue.

I tried taping off the wood but that just seemed to make more of a mess.

-- I support the 28th Amendment. http://www.wolf-pac.com/28th

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DanoP

135 posts in 1093 days


#3 posted 07-07-2012 02:09 PM

Thanks guys. I use a wet rag on the outsides of the boxes but my technique I’m using now (similar … Kinda, to Boxguy’s EZMiter) has me closing up the box till the glue dries then cutting the top off. I can’t get into the sealed box to wipe off the wet glue.

I eventually get the glue off using my marking knife and lots of time. Just hoping for an easier method. There might not be one and this may just be a drawback to this method.

That still leaves the second question. How do you buff and sand the inside corners to get them just as shiny and smooth as the rest of the box? The answer can’t be just cover it in velvet or suede. After hours of fussin and frettin, the bottom of the inside corners never look just right.

Looking forward to your replies.
Dano P.

-- We've got enough youth. Let's search for a fountain of smart.

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woody123

52 posts in 2060 days


#4 posted 07-07-2012 02:37 PM

I found a quick way of cleaning the glue out of the corners by using a plastic drinking straw. I squeeze it a little to form a crease, then push it down the corner while the glue is still wet, scooping the glue up as I push it along.
I then clip the end of the straw that is full of glue,and keep on cleaning with the cleared end. It works like a charm.

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KnickKnack

994 posts in 2320 days


#5 posted 07-07-2012 02:42 PM

…using a plastic drinking straw

That seems like a pretty ace idea.

One other thing I do now, being a mathematician, is to put less glue on. The instructions always say something like – ”until a thin bead of glue squeezes out”. That was all glue that didn’t need to be there, so, it seems to me that if you’d put slightly less glue on, less would squeeze out, until you get to the point where none squeezes out but if you’d added more it would have done. As someone said somewhere else – it’s a box, no-one is expecting to be able to play football with it.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5304 posts in 1331 days


#6 posted 07-07-2012 03:13 PM

Once I do a dry fit and everything is to my liking, I finish the piece with Watco oil and finish the project.
Then, I do the glue up.
Glue doesn’t stick to the finished project.
It’s a lot more work, but I think it looks better.
HTH

I don’t skimp on the glue, no sense starving the joinery.

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knotheadswoodshed

174 posts in 926 days


#7 posted 07-07-2012 03:27 PM

I buff the insides of my boxes prior to assembly with tripoli and white diamond..up to the miter joint (not the miter itself) after the glue dries, I find that it peels off nicely, and still leaves me with a nice strong glue joint

-- Randy - "I dont make mistakes, I make design change opportunities" www.knotheadswoodshed.com

View Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist's profile

Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist

5281 posts in 2062 days


#8 posted 07-07-2012 04:18 PM

I put glue on the miters except for the last 1/16th of the inside. Usually any clamp pressure will add a wee bit of glue to this spot. This will not affect the joint but I rarely ever get squeeze out. As a precaution I also cover the edges of the inside miter with Frog tape prior to glueup.

-- Each step of every Wood Art project I design and build is considered my masterpiece… because I want the finished product to reflect the quality and creativeness of my work

View ddockstader's profile

ddockstader

119 posts in 2015 days


#9 posted 07-07-2012 04:31 PM

One other trick – rub the insides of the box up to the miter with an old candle stub. The paraffin coating won’t allow the glue to stick and it can be dissolved (after you remove the dried glue) with mineral spirits.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11688 posts in 2442 days


#10 posted 07-07-2012 04:33 PM

Finish insides before assembly , taking care not to get any on the surfaces to be glued , and if you put a nice coat of wax next to the joints , the glue won’t stick : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2847 posts in 1002 days


#11 posted 07-08-2012 01:42 AM

Dewaxed shellac. Glue won’t stick to it, virtually any other finish will

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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Cato

641 posts in 2066 days


#12 posted 07-08-2012 01:48 PM

I generally finish my inside before glue up and if the finish is shellac then glue won’t stick to it as Joe says.

If it is not shellac or is not going to get a finish after glue up then I will use tape like frog tape to keep the glue off.

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jmartel

2818 posts in 904 days


#13 posted 07-10-2012 07:41 PM

When you glue it up, use q-tips dunked in water to clean up the wet glue. Once you get it all cleaned up, it will dry out and not have any finishing problems.

-- End grain is like a belly button. Yes, I know you have one. No, I don't want to see it.

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Dusty56

11688 posts in 2442 days


#14 posted 07-10-2012 08:32 PM

Please read his post …the box is closed until he cuts the top off !

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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