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Forum topic by mbs posted 07-06-2012 02:36 AM 3847 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mbs

1493 posts in 1686 days


07-06-2012 02:36 AM

Topic tags/keywords: drum sander powermatic dds225

I bought this 25” drum sander used with high hopes of saving sanding time but I’ve been disappointed in the results.

I’m having problems wrapping the sandpaper on the drum and having it stay put after I run wood through it. I can get what I think is a good wrap but it shifts under load and either overlaps itself which causes a groove in the wood or it shifts and causes a gap in the paper. I wouldn’t have thought a gap would be a problem since the drum spins much faster than the feed rate and the sandpaper is wrapped at an angle. However, I’m getting a slight raized groove in the wood that is approx the same width as the gap in the paper. I’m using new 150 grit paper, only using the rear drum to isolate the problem, the feed rate is on slow and I’m taking less approx 0.002” depth of cut.

BTW – I’m also frustrated with how quickly the paper gets glazed or loaded with glue which causes streaking in the wood. I do load the wood at an angle to minimize the impact of the glue line to hit the same place on the roller.

Have you had similar issues? How did you overcome them?

Thanks

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.


11 replies so far

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Loren

7822 posts in 2394 days


#1 posted 07-06-2012 02:42 AM

Use a gum rubber block to remove glazing early. Wrapped
paper stretches and needs to be re-tensioned often.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1929 days


#2 posted 07-06-2012 03:16 AM

No matter what brand drum sander you have, glue will always glaze the paper. Invest in a good scraper and remove excess glue from your glue joints before running the stock through the drum sander. I have a JET drum sander and I haven’t had any problems with the paper rolls sliding on the drum. It could possibly be that your trying to take too much stock off at a time. I take very light passes, it may take longer but I don’t have burning issues and my paper lasts a lot longer. Make sure the drums are clean before wrapping the paper on and maintain tension as you roll the paper on. As Loren says us the rubber block to clean the paper but again scrape the glue first before sanding.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

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mbs

1493 posts in 1686 days


#3 posted 07-06-2012 03:32 AM

Thanks for the quick replies – I use the gum rubber block on the sand paper and clean the glue joints with the scraper. The glue is only a problem if I’m unable to feed the work at a angle because of the width.

The manual says each rotation of the hand wheel is 0.011” and I am only turning it about 1/6 of a turn. I can’t imagine turning it much less than that.

Loren – the paper is shifting on the very first pass after I change it. And it is tight on the drum after the first pass. Is your paper noticably loose?

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.

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Loren

7822 posts in 2394 days


#4 posted 07-06-2012 03:35 AM

Haven’t messed with the drum sander recently. No, because
loosness is distributed across the rum. If the paper overlaps on
you while the drum is running though I am certain you have
a paper tension issue. I can’t make it easy for you because
drum sanders are not easy.

How many passes at each depth?

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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mbs

1493 posts in 1686 days


#5 posted 07-06-2012 03:39 AM

The paper gets either overlap or gap after the very first pass. I have tried additional passes either at the same depth or up to 2 more passes at a 1/6th turn to see if it self corrects and “settles in” but it didnt work. I don’t know about your drum but mine is spring loaded to self tighten.

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11495 posts in 1436 days


#6 posted 07-07-2012 02:35 AM

I have 2 drum sanders with the ‘spring loaded’ feature. A nice theory buy they will not take up the slack from the paper stretching. Loren’s advice to rewrap/tighten new paper frequently is what I follow with mine. No worries after all the stretch is gone. Some woods (cherry,Jatoba) tend to glaze the finer grits unless you take extremely shallow passes. I have heard a lot of praise for the hook and loop paper/drum combination but have no experience there.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2246 posts in 2293 days


#7 posted 07-07-2012 02:55 AM

Maybe I can actually offer advice that will change your current perception of the new sander in your shop. We use a 26” Steele city drum sander. The trailing tensioner I personally believe is not adequate and thus I experienced much of the same frustrations you have. I decided to wrap my drums with hook and loop. Immediate improvement and 100% happy. Never issues with paper coming loose or overlapping. In fact, the more the wander is used the tighter the paper gets and no threats of paper coming loose or overlapping. I never have glue loading issues. I sand numerous panels weekly with our sander. We use 80 grit on front drum, and 120 grit on rear drum.. I instruct my guys to never take more then 1/10th turn on the handle and I prefer just a slight turn more like 1/12th turn..Remember that we are actually sanding panels flat with the wander and not planing panels. Our panels leave the planet mostly flat and with approximately 3 or 4 passes at our sander on both sides our panels become very flat. Then of course ROS is required to remove small linear sanding lines left from the large sander. This is just our process but it works very well and I am confident you also will find success with your wander if you follow my advice.

And I believe I buy my sand paper and hook and loop from supergrit.com.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

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Jerry

2246 posts in 2293 days


#8 posted 07-07-2012 03:01 AM

My spelling issues above is more to do with typing on my HTC EVO. Sorry about that.
Also wanted to note that I never use a scraper on my panels as they go straight from the planer to the sander.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

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mbs

1493 posts in 1686 days


#9 posted 07-08-2012 11:28 AM

Jerry – I was surprised you’re only taking .0.001” cut. I would have thought a deeper cut could ba taken.

I will either try the h&l or switch to a wide belt sander. How did you attach he h&l to the drum?

Thanks

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2246 posts in 2293 days


#10 posted 07-08-2012 02:32 PM

The h and l stuff is sticky back and attaches easy. I think if it were me and I had the budget I would buy a belt sander, only because we are a cabinet shop. A belt sander is likely over kill for a woodworker hobby. But I am pretty certain you can take much deeper cuts.with a wide belt sander and I don’t think you would get as much linear lines to deal with as u do from a drum sander. I have never used a wide belt sander myself, but everything I have read and heard, they are awesome to use and much better then drum Sanders.

But if u can make the drum sander work for your situation, then the h and l will be your answer and I assure you will not be dissapointed and your cost.will be about 100.00 +/-. Hope this helps.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View killerb's profile

killerb

150 posts in 1144 days


#11 posted 07-08-2012 05:56 PM

I have a woodmaster with H&L and it works great. I use Industrial Abrasives for all my sandpaper. No sliding of paper on mine. It sounds as I believe Jerry said. Your tension device is not enough. Also, If you are starting at 150 grit, that is way to fine. I start at 100 or less. I do just like Jerry. Go straight from the planer to the sander. No glue lines at all. Your panels should be flat to start. bob

-- Bob www.bobkloes.com

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