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Rip Blades For Chainsaw Mill

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Forum topic by gfadvm posted 752 days ago 3230 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gfadvm

10567 posts in 1289 days


752 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: chainsaw rip chains

I talked with a really nice guy at Bailey’s Arborist today about ordering rip blades for my little Alaskan mill. He said they will improve cut quality but not cutting speed so I passed. This info really suprised me as a rip blade makes a BIG difference in speed of cut on the TS. Primarily posted this as an FYI for others with chainsaw mills. Mine is slow going and a LOT of work and fuel!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm


15 replies so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

14635 posts in 1166 days


#1 posted 750 days ago

I would usually order a rip chain simpley because they where the same price, but if I had to buy locally I just bought a regular chain. I never really seen a big difference, and I would just sharpen to lower the angle a little each time.

Here is my chain saw mill blog http://lumberjocks.com/donwilwol/blog/23436

I recently upgaded to a band saw mill and kept the chainsaw mill for any pieces to big for my small mill. The primary reason was speed, although the quality is better as well.

I never found a way to increase the speed much. As I got older, I found it less fun to opperate.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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gfadvm

10567 posts in 1289 days


#2 posted 750 days ago

Don, I appreciate the response and the link pretty much answered all of my questions. I bought this Alaskan mill with Jonserad saw off CL for $75 and it works great just slow.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Doss

779 posts in 863 days


#3 posted 750 days ago

You need a sharp chain. If you aren’t sharpening your chain often and keeping it cool, then it’s going to take a long time. Ripping chain leaves a pretty clean cut (for a chainsaw), but don’t expect it to look like it passed through a tablesaw. You’re still going to end up cleaning the lumber up.

I like chisel chains and depending on how wide the tree is usually determines if you want to run full or half skip (or just regular). I usually sharpen mine after 2-3 passes (10-12’ long x 30-50” wide per pass in different oak species).

You all have probably seen my picture before, but I’ll post it again here:

In case I haven’t stressed it enough, sharpen your chains properly. Don’t try to do it without a guide. Don’t get it close enough. Sharp chain makes everything easier. Just use the chisel chain at first (or house chain or whatever you have) and gradually reshape it to near ripping specs with every new sharpening. Even regular chain can be shaped and sharpened to cut really smooth and fast. Also, avoid electric sharpeners. The heat they produce softens the cutters.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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gfadvm

10567 posts in 1289 days


#4 posted 750 days ago

Doss, Thanks for the input. I always use a sharp chain but the keeping it cool escapes me. How do you do that when sawing?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Doss

779 posts in 863 days


#5 posted 750 days ago

Well, if you look really closely at the pic, you’ll see a black container with a white top about 1’ higher than the end of the jig. It’s a little hard to see, but it’s there. That has a hose running to the tip of the saw that has a spout at the bottom of the container to control the flow of chain lube. So, I keep my chain lube reservoir on the saw filled and also run that one at a slow dribble to keep the end cool. It’s a little unnecessary on smaller cuts (under 30”), but it won’t hurt anything.

Just make sure you are filing at the angles that a rip chain works at and not what a normal crosscut chain is filed to.

If you have any more questions, feel free to ask.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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gfadvm

10567 posts in 1289 days


#6 posted 750 days ago

Doss, Thanks again. My largest possible cut is 13” with the mill/saw I have. When I resharpen I need to work toward 0 degrees gradually?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Don W's profile

Don W

14635 posts in 1166 days


#7 posted 749 days ago

What saw are you using?

I need to work toward 0 degrees gradually? …....This is what I do.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Doss

779 posts in 863 days


#8 posted 749 days ago

Depending on the wood and type of chain 0-10 is acceptable. Remember to keep upward pressure when sharpening so you get the top plate. Check the rakers as well to make sure they’re set at a height that allows progress but doesn’t bog the saw down.

If you’re used to seeing ribbons coming out of the cut, you can pretty much forget that when ripping. I make dust when cutting… and a lot of it.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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gfadvm

10567 posts in 1289 days


#9 posted 749 days ago

Don- The mill came with a Jonserad 510 made in 1983. It starts and runs like a banshee (but is a little small?). 16” bar. I also have an Echo with 18” bar that I use to cross cut firewood (really light weight but cuts really well).

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2855 posts in 1086 days


#10 posted 749 days ago

Andy, your 510 should handle a 24” bar with no problem. I’m not a fan of Jonsered, but that’s just personal preference.

edit:

Just did some googling and found this:
http://www.jackssmallengines.com/chainsaw_bar_gb.cfm?manu_name=Jonsered

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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gfadvm

10567 posts in 1289 days


#11 posted 749 days ago

Thanks Dallas, I clicked on it but the longer bars for my old saw are no longer sold there. I have a new 16” bar on it now which is long enough for most of my stuff.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Don W

14635 posts in 1166 days


#12 posted 748 days ago

I don’t know much about Jonsered saws. I know I tried a Husky 386 first, but that was left for the firewood. The 385 is much faster and if I recall correctly I’ve got a 27” bar on it. I don’t typically cut the size stuff like Doss does, but it did ok. Its hard to say, slow is relative and can mean something different to everyone.

I bought the bandsaw mill because I had a bunch of blown down trees and I knew it would take me a long time to cut them up with the chainsaw. I wanted most of it into 1” lumber. For a few logs now and then, I’d still recommend the chainsaw. I did well by me.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1292 days


#13 posted 748 days ago

I’m in need of a mill, like I have been for a couple of years now. I see them on CL but they’re usually massive homebrewed ones. I feel like any money I spend on a chainsaw mill could go toward and LT10. I’ve got a lot of expensive toys on my “to do” list.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Don W's profile

Don W

14635 posts in 1166 days


#14 posted 748 days ago

I disagree with the ”I feel like any money I spend on a chainsaw mill could go toward and LT10” part Al. First, the mill is only about $200. (that’s brand new retail). The chainsaw you’ll need anyhow, even with the LT10, and the mill will allow you to cut stuff with the LT10 that would otherwise be to big.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Doss

779 posts in 863 days


#15 posted 747 days ago

But then you get big chainsaw mills like mine. It’s great for getting really big logs cut down to size (40”+ in diameter). It was probably close to the same price as a small bandsaw mill (not made by Wood-Mizer but the same capacities as the smaller Wood-Mizers (20-30”)). I needed it though b/c I have huge logs I wanted to cut and I knew going in I wanted wide slabs. So, it has it’s purpose.

I really want a smaller 30-36” bandsaw mill to handle quartering for me. I like the big center section slabs from the middle 1/3 of the log, but the upper and lower 1/3 kill me on time with a chainsaw.

Like Don, I think the money is well-spent on a chainsaw mill if you only plan on cutting a few logs a year. If you start cutting 5+ logs under 30” a year, you really need to step up to a bandsaw mill.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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