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Forum topic by mzimmers posted 07-04-2012 12:57 AM 970 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mzimmers

121 posts in 2571 days


07-04-2012 12:57 AM

Topic tags/keywords: router template bushing jig

Hi, all -

I have a rather unusual project that is going to be tricky to describe. Imagine that you have a smallish block of wood (say, 6” by 12” by 1”). You wish to cut a relief into one face of the wood that is 1/2” deep and 4” by 10”, leaving a 1” border on all four sides.

I’ve heard of using templates, jigs and bushings for this, but I’m having trouble putting the whole idea together. First of all, I don’t understand the process of making a template. It seems like you need a template to make a template! If someone could help me over this hump, that would be great.

I get that if I use a bushing, I need to oversize the template by 2X the difference between the radius of the cutter, and the diameter of the bushing. I think I have that covered.

So, assuming that I’ve already got the proper template, do I center it over the workpiece and clamp it down? Do people typically make templates large enough to leave room for clamping? And, what is done to secure the work underneath the template? Would I fasten something to the table to prevent movement of the work, or or do I build an “under-template” that would hold the work in place?

Thanks for any clarification; I hope I made sense in this post.

-- M. Zimmers


16 replies so far

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1167 posts in 1515 days


#1 posted 07-04-2012 02:09 AM

You can use double-sided tape to tape the template to the workpiece. Or make a framework to hold the workpice and template. Or make the template larger and use clamps to hold the template and workpiece in place. For a single item the tape would probably be the easiest…

Good Luck

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112102 posts in 2233 days


#2 posted 07-04-2012 02:14 AM

Not sure what your calling a relief do you mean a rabbit or a groove leaving some wood on the top and bottom with a groove in the center of the edge ?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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mzimmers

121 posts in 2571 days


#3 posted 07-04-2012 02:23 AM

Jim -

Yeah, I didn’t think I was using the right word. Picture a board 1/2” by 12” by 6”. Now imagine some 1/2” by 1” strips, 2 of which would be 12” long, and 2 of which would be 4” long. Lay the strips along the perimeter of one face of the board, glue/screw in place, and that’s the shape of what I want. Except, made of a single piece of wood.

Rounding on the inside corners is OK.

-- M. Zimmers

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a1Jim

112102 posts in 2233 days


#4 posted 07-04-2012 02:32 AM

Ok if I understand right all you have to do is make a cut on all edges 1” deep on the table saw and then lower the blade so it’s only sticking up a high enough to just leave the 1” around the top and then cut the board laying flat cutting of all the edges .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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mzimmers

121 posts in 2571 days


#5 posted 07-04-2012 02:38 AM

Heh…no, I’m doing a really lousy job of describing it. I don’t want cuts on the edges; I wish to keep the edges intact. I want a 1/2” “cutout” inside of the edges.

Picture a shallow, flat-bottomed, rectangular bowl. Maybe that will help.

-- M. Zimmers

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a1Jim

112102 posts in 2233 days


#6 posted 07-04-2012 02:41 AM

you want to dish out a 1/2” on the flat side of the board ?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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mzimmers

121 posts in 2571 days


#7 posted 07-04-2012 02:44 AM

Yes, leaving a raised edge on all four sides. (My dimensions may change a bit; I was just trying to keep the example simple.)

This is going to hold a rectangular glass ashtray.

-- M. Zimmers

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a1Jim

112102 posts in 2233 days


#8 posted 07-04-2012 02:57 AM

I hate to come full circle but what Herb C suggested was pretty close. It’s very similar to making routered bowls .

http://www.woodsmithshop.com/download/302/routedbowls.pdf

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4926 posts in 1233 days


#9 posted 07-04-2012 02:57 AM

Maybe draw a picture? Top, side, and end view maybe?

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

121 posts in 2571 days


#10 posted 07-04-2012 03:09 AM

Hey, Jim -

I think you have the idea now. I like that article you linked, though I’m not sure I need quite the level of elaboration called for there.

Instead of cutting my template, can I use some 1” stock and screw it to a large base? That would seem easier, and result in cleaner edges to follow.

Thanks!

-- M. Zimmers

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a1Jim

112102 posts in 2233 days


#11 posted 07-04-2012 03:12 AM

Good luck I hope comes out ok.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Remedyman's profile

Remedyman

47 posts in 853 days


#12 posted 07-04-2012 04:27 AM

I would just take a piece of stock substantially bigger, screw some 1xs alongside your box and screw some more to the top reaching in to the point that you want. Then go to work.

Basically a box to how your wood, then a frame over it to match the border you want left.

-- As long as our customers are happy, we have done a good job. Even if we are our own customer.

View samadams's profile

samadams

1 post in 809 days


#13 posted 07-04-2012 04:56 AM

I get what you’re saying. I would first clearly mark lines 1” from the edge for visual reference, then use a guide on my router to get it 1” in from the edge. When cutting the initial “groove” just be careful not to go past the lines. Do all four edges, then remove the router guide and route out the inner part, starting from the center and working my way out. I would start from the center so the bottom plate of my router always has something to rest on, to keep from plunging too deep. It would require some patience, but it beats making a jig or a template just for a single item.

What you say about needing a template to make a template made me chuckle a little, because I remember thinking the same thing some time ago. Making a template is very time consuming and requires a lot of patience, and is usually made using different tools, such as a band saw, edge sander, etc… But once the template is done, it’s much faster to crank out lots of identical pieces using the router. I have never made a template for a single item, since it’s easier to just go ahead and make the item.

View bent's profile

bent

311 posts in 2325 days


#14 posted 07-04-2012 12:48 PM

i’ve done something similar to what you are describing. here’s how i did it:

-use a table saw to cut some L shaped pieces, make one leg of the L the thickness that you want the “bowl” sides to to be. make sure you cut enough L pieces to wrap the perimeter of your project.
-glue the L shaped pieces around your project piece so that it is framed in. only put glue on the side of the L that will contact the edges of your workpiece, not the top of it. the side of the L that you desiginated as the wall thickness should face up.
-use a router with a pattern tracing bit to rout out the hollowed area.
-use a table saw to cut the L shaped pieces off of your project.

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

121 posts in 2571 days


#15 posted 07-04-2012 01:46 PM

Remedyman: I would do that, except that the stock I’m contemplating is going to be pretty pricey (I’m thinking of African blackwood).

Samadams: I’ll consider that, though I don’t mind making a pattern/jig of some kind. It’ll be a good learning experience for me. Plus, I like to work in such a way that relies least on hand/eye coordination.

bent: interesting approach. Have you ever tried clamping your framing pieces instead of gluing them?

Thanks for all the ideas, everyone.

-- M. Zimmers

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