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10" tablesaw combo blade for ripping?

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Forum topic by Mike posted 07-03-2012 12:15 AM 1468 views 2 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mike

60 posts in 898 days


07-03-2012 12:15 AM

I’m looking for a better cut than what my Freud 24 tooth rip blade gives me. Certain woods I get small tear out marks on the bottom of the wood when cutting Cherry and Walnut. This blade only has about 30 BF run through it, but probably 50% of my rip cuts need cleanup. I’m a guy who doesn’t yet yet have a jointer so I need a good cut off the saw. If I use a 60 tooth finish blade the cuts are incredible so it’s not the saw, blade height, or feed speed. I’m thinking about trying a combo blade to increase tooth count and hopefully increase cut perfomance. Has anyone else done this and how did it go? Maybe in another year I’ll have a jointer and wont need to think about this but for now, I’d like a better cut.


25 replies so far

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Gary

7371 posts in 2122 days


#1 posted 07-03-2012 01:00 AM

My common blade is a 40 tooth

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

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waho6o9

5084 posts in 1266 days


#2 posted 07-03-2012 01:03 AM

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waho6o9

5084 posts in 1266 days


#3 posted 07-03-2012 01:07 AM

After ripping on the table saw, I planed the edges with a #7 Bailey hand plane
and the joins were awesome, and quick as well.

HTH

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lumberjoe

2842 posts in 937 days


#4 posted 07-03-2012 01:25 AM

Freud LM74M010. It’s a triple chip grind, not a flat top blade, and it’s 30 tooth. It will rip better than a combo blade. If you want to get a combo blade, I would HIGHLY recommend the Infinity 010-150. Both blades are around 70$ retail. The infinity is an ATB blade. You could also look at something like the Freud LU84R011 50 tooth combo blade. It is a 4 and 1 style blade, meaning there is one flat top tooth, followed by 4 ATB teeth.

I have had glue ready cuts with both the 30 tooth glue line rip and the combo blade.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11237 posts in 1379 days


#5 posted 07-03-2012 01:45 AM

I’m not seeing this with my Freud 24 tooth rip blade. Are you using a zero clearance insert?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Mike

60 posts in 898 days


#6 posted 07-03-2012 02:27 AM

I dont, just the standard insert that came with my saw.

I should add that, the blade is an older 24 tooth Freud, never used until maybe a month or two ago. It’s a pretty heavy blade, and not the Diablo line. When I dont get chipping, I can and have glued the boards for table tops and things are fine…but when there’s chips…I re-rip using different blade heights, speeds etc until I get a good finished cut.

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lumberjoe

2842 posts in 937 days


#7 posted 07-03-2012 02:35 AM

That blade is likely a flat top blade, Those can chip more than an ATB or a TCG style. A combo blade will usually have a 4&1 tooth pattern, with gullets in between for chip removal. A flat top blade should be a lot quicker and efficient at removing material when cutting with the grain (ripping) as that is when you get chipping the most.

Maybe a zero clearance insert is your best bet? I noticed much cleaner cuts with a ZCI wihen cross cutting. Ripping was always acceptable. Another thing, have you checked your saw for run out?

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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MonteCristo

2097 posts in 877 days


#8 posted 07-03-2012 02:56 AM

There is something strange going on if you are getting a poor finish when ripping with a good ripping blade. These blades are optimized for ripping and should outperform a combination blade of comparable quality, unless the stock is quite thin in which case the difference in finish is likely minimal.

My experience with high quality ripping blades is that they provide a better finsih than a jointer (you don’t get the ripple effect inherent in power jointing), so good in fact that I refinish jointed edges on the table saw, which also guarantees square edges, something that most jointers struggle to give.

If you want an incredible combination blade, try a Forrest WWII. This blade is amazingly good at ripping and cross-cutting.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

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gfadvm

11237 posts in 1379 days


#9 posted 07-03-2012 03:04 AM

It seems to me that a ZCI is essential for maximizing cut quality. Someone correct me if I’m wrong here.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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MonteCristo

2097 posts in 877 days


#10 posted 07-03-2012 03:15 AM

@gfadvm

Zero clearance throat plates are much more important when cross-cutting because the tendency to chip is much higher, thus the need for support very near the cut. When ripping zero clearance is much less of a benefit, although it is obviously not a bad idea.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

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gfadvm

11237 posts in 1379 days


#11 posted 07-03-2012 03:22 AM

MC- I agree to a certain extent but would add that some woods are much more prone to chip than others.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5515 posts in 2064 days


#12 posted 07-03-2012 03:40 AM

”There is something strange going on if you are getting a poor finish when ripping with a good ripping blade. These blades are optimized for ripping and should outperform a combination blade of comparable quality”

I guess it depends on how you define the term ”outperform”. If all other parameters are equal (hook angle, tooth grind, side clearance, etc.) more teeth should equate to a cleaner cut but with more resistance, and fewer teeth should equate to a rougher cut but with less resistance. Most bulk 20T to 24T rippers are designed to rip efficiently in thick dense stock (flat top grind, large gullets, and very steep hook angle are all aggressive characteristics), with less emphasis on smooth cut and low tearout. Many of 30T “glue line” rippers are designed for a highly polished edge but at the expense of lower efficiency, so they’re not generally recommended for rips over ~ 1”.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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MonteCristo

2097 posts in 877 days


#13 posted 07-03-2012 03:44 AM

@gfadvm

True enough. I have heard that red oak plywood is the acid test. Maybe a ZCI makes a difference ripping there. In any event, I think Mike (the thread starter) should try a different ripping blade as it seems very likely to me that the one he is using is defective in some way . . .

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

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MonteCristo

2097 posts in 877 days


#14 posted 07-03-2012 03:52 AM

@knotscott

I agree with your logic, but would say that the differences in a lot of cases between these various blades, assuming they are high-end blades, is very small. I use FS Tool glue line rip blades and they are amazingly good even in stock over 1” thick. As I mentioned in replying to gfadvm, Mike’s problems go way beyond what we are debating here, ie. his blade must be defective in some way.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View Mike's profile

Mike

60 posts in 898 days


#15 posted 07-03-2012 11:01 AM

Thank you everyone, lots of great info here, as always. I will investigate buying a zero clearance insert for my saw. I have checked for run out…or what I think is run out anways LOL. I
m usually dealing with 3 foot and under cuts, and of them when ripping full length I get the same measure at the start and the finish of the board so my fence is square to the blade. I assume this is where you measure run out (I’m still new and learning :) ). I’ve inspected the teeth on the blade, just with the naked eys, I dont see or feel any chips or bent teeth. Maybe part of the problem is the wood? I’m only cutting Cherry and Black Walnut right now. I just glued up a Cherry table top for an end table, of the 4 board ripped on both sides I hade to mess around with roughly half the rips and “do over” but was eventually able to get a clean line for glue up. Same thing happened on the last walnut table I made. Maybe even the lot of wood I’m dealing with is the root cause? I may pickup another rip blade and try that, if it doesn;t fix it I can always use it on my little contractors saw for cutting pt. I didn;t want to drop $70 on a glue line rip blade if the same thing would happen but I suppose if a new rip blade corrects it, then the choice to later buy a high quality glue line rip is the obvious one. I wonder if the recent temps and humidity can alter how wood behaves when cut? My shop is a basement shop…not overly humid like it will be later in the summer but it is getting a little warm.

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