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Buying the G0555 and I have a question

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Forum topic by Matt Schnurbusch posted 07-12-2008 03:50 AM 1299 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2365 days


07-12-2008 03:50 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw

OK, So I’m going to order the Grizzly G0555 Bandsaw in the next coupld of days, and I want an opinion before I place the order.

I currently have a 6” jointer with no hope of getting an 8” any time soon. Does it make more sense to buy the riser block now? Or invest in a couple of better quality blades and then get the riser block (and new blades) when I can afford a larger jointer? I don’t really know how much resawing I’m going to do, probably use it mostly for curves and such.

On that note, is it possible to cut veneers and then “smooth” them with a planer? Most of what I see on TV, Wood Works, utilizes a drum sander which also is not in the budget right now. My G1021 planer won’t go but so thin.

Let me know what you think.

I’m going to be asking a lot of questions so get used to seeing me up here. Maybe someday, I’ll be able to help out someone such as myself.

Matt

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt


28 replies so far

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2575 days


#1 posted 07-12-2008 04:44 AM

Matt,

If it were me I would go ahead and get the riser block.

As far as planing thin stock one trick that you can use is to glue two boards of equal size together. Put the glue only on in a a 1” wide band on the back edge of the boards. Clamp the glued edge and when the glue is dried put the boards through the planer. Take light passes (1/32” or less) on both sides until you have reached 2x the thickness that you want. Saw the glued edge off the two boards and you have two boards that are planed to a thickness less than your planer is supposedly capable of doing. But I would not recommend doing this for veneers. They are just too thin.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 2692 days


#2 posted 07-12-2008 01:30 PM

I just bought the Grizzly G0555 with the riser block and wheeled base. You can probably make a wheeled base better and cheaper than what they’ve got, but I figured eventually I’ll want the riser, so I got it all at once.

As for veneers, a lot would depend on how thick you slice them. There is the possibility that you could run your work through the planer after you’ve attached it to the substrate, if they’re thick enough. Or you could build a sled for your veneers and use double stick tape.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

View Iffy's profile

Iffy

26 posts in 2679 days


#3 posted 07-12-2008 04:52 PM

I just got the G0555X and I got the riser block at the same time. You’re already doing some assembly when you get it (the table, fence, etc.) so it was a good time to just do the riser block before you got too far. Then you don’t have to take the thing apart later.

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ChicoWoodnut

904 posts in 2568 days


#4 posted 07-12-2008 05:02 PM

I say go for the riser. You won’t be sorry and like Iffy says, taking the saw apart later is a real PITA. Don’t let the 6” jointer stop you from making wider re-sawn panels. There are ways to use the planer to flatten wider boards.

-- Scott - Chico California http://chicowoodnut.home.comcast.net

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2365 days


#5 posted 07-12-2008 05:40 PM

Pretty much looks like the concensus is to get the riser. I would have thought there would have been at least an opinion or two that better blades would have been the way to go.

Thanks for your inputs folks… Looks like I’ll go for the riser.

Matt

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View brunob's profile

brunob

2277 posts in 2922 days


#6 posted 07-12-2008 05:45 PM

I bought one a year ago with the riser. I’m glad I did. A drum sander would sand the veneer, but since you don’t have one, the method Scott suggests will work.

-- Bruce from Central New York...now, if you'll pardon me, I have some sawdust to make.

View rikkor's profile

rikkor

11295 posts in 2627 days


#7 posted 07-12-2008 06:08 PM

Get the riser at the beginning. Assembly is more pleasant when the saw is (relatively) clean.

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2741 days


#8 posted 07-12-2008 06:15 PM

Get the riser first thing. That way you will have all the capibility, plus you won’tget stuck with a bunch small blades when you did get it.

You will find all kinds of uses for the extra 6” even without cutting vener. Make a drum sander your next purchase and you will have a great team of tools.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2365 days


#9 posted 07-14-2008 10:26 PM

So I was just about to buy my saw with riser, and thought gee I have no idea what blades to get with it. I’m going to search around the forum a little, but does anyone have a recomendation on 105” blades from Grizzly? Or should I get them elsewhere?

Matt

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2741 days


#10 posted 07-14-2008 10:30 PM

I have used a 105” Woodslicer from highland hardware for years. Works great. I have never heard any complaints about them.

http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=1293

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View John's profile

John

341 posts in 2551 days


#11 posted 07-14-2008 10:46 PM

I have the G0555 and love it, I don’t have the riser block but I’m sure I will miss that someday. If I did it over I would go for the G0555X for the extra HP although I’ve never bogged mine, again I could foresee needing the power in the future. Don’t buy Grizzly blades, the blade that comes with the saw is worthless. I went to Woodcraft and found nice ones in 1/4” 1/2” and 3/4” and they meet all my current needs.

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2365 days


#12 posted 07-14-2008 11:44 PM

I guess I misphrased my question…

In 1/4, 1/2, 3/4” are there any particular TPIs that I should get. I’ve never owned a band saw and have no idea what blades will do what for me. I imagine I will either be getting Timberwolf, or Woodslicers in various sizes, I just don’t want to buy blades I don’t need or won’t use.

Thanks to everyone for the help. This place is incredible.

Matt

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2497 days


#13 posted 07-15-2008 12:12 AM

Matt, if you’re going to be doing a lot of resawing, you want the least amount of teeth on the blade, so get like a 3 tpi blade. Too many teeth on the blade will clog up when resawing and cause blade wandering and overheating problems. I use 3 or 4 tooth blades for everything. You really can’t tell much difference in the finish of the cut, if you’re using good blades. I wouldn’t recommend a 3/4” blade for a 14” band saw. Too much stress on the saw frame.

View Matt Schnurbusch's profile

Matt Schnurbusch

36 posts in 2365 days


#14 posted 07-15-2008 12:23 AM

Along with the wood specific blades, is there a bood quality bimetal blade that I should get. I imagine my brother will make use of the band saw as well, but he will work mostly with metal.

Sorry, I have a ton of questions. Kind of a refelection of my ignorance.

Matt

-- - If you can't have fun doin' it, it aint worth doin' - Matt

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2741 days


#15 posted 07-15-2008 12:32 AM

The woodslicer blade I mentioned has a variable tooth spacing from 3 to 4 teeth per inch.
This will reduce vibration a lot and give you a smoother cut.

For resawing I use a 3/4” blade on my bandsaw that has a feature to remove the tension by moving a lever after I am done using it.

I use a 1/2” blade on my saw that does not have that feature.

Your saw will run too fast to cut anything other than aluminuim or brass. Don’t go cutting any ferrous metals
with it.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

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