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Forum topic by Doss posted 06-29-2012 01:42 AM 1053 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Doss

779 posts in 930 days


06-29-2012 01:42 AM

... and if you can, name it. As usual, I don’t have any of the leaves but I do have a freshly cut piece. This was a blow down and the city is willing to let me haul some of it away. The trunk is about 24-30 inches in diameter and it was about 30-45 feet tall. The wood was mainly white with a dark brown heart.

It’s in central MS… so do your best. Thanks.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss


15 replies so far

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gfadvm

10974 posts in 1355 days


#1 posted 06-29-2012 01:47 AM

Hackberry from what I can see. A pic of the cut end would help.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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WDHLT15

1140 posts in 1141 days


#2 posted 06-29-2012 02:11 AM

Yes, could be hackberry for sure. Could be beech, and I have seen red maple that smooth too. Is the bark on the lower part of the tree knobby or warty?

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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joebloe

157 posts in 959 days


#3 posted 06-29-2012 03:42 AM

sycamore is what I think ,where are you located? that would help.

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Doss

779 posts in 930 days


#4 posted 06-29-2012 04:18 AM

John

It’s in central MS… so do your best. – Doss

That means Jackson, MS for the most part.

I think it might be sycamore. I’ll grab some pics tomorrow. They said I could have the lower part (about 15’) if I want it because they don’t know when they’ll get around to removing that.

Is there any one of those that I need to avoid? That is, are any of them a waste of time as far as wood is concerned. I mill mainly oaks so I don’t know if any of these are troublesome to work with. If they are, I’ll still probably get it just to have around or cut stools or firewood from.

Thanks y’all.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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tomd

1759 posts in 2436 days


#5 posted 06-29-2012 04:20 AM

Sycamore !

-- Tom D

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Doss

779 posts in 930 days


#6 posted 06-29-2012 02:31 PM

Okay, my original guess was that it was sycamore and you guys are confirming that. I’ll get a pic of the trunk today hopefully.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1140 posts in 1141 days


#7 posted 06-30-2012 01:03 AM

The bark is not light enough to be sycamore from most sycamore that I seen. The bottom of large sycamore is scaly and greenish brown. As you move up the trunk, the bark turns white. A pic of the lower bole will certainly help along with a close-up pic of the end grain.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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gfadvm

10974 posts in 1355 days


#8 posted 06-30-2012 01:18 AM

That doesn’t look like the sycamores we have here but maybe MS sycamore is different?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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fussy

980 posts in 1716 days


#9 posted 06-30-2012 04:01 AM

Not sycamore. Sycamore bark peels like scraps of paper. Looks like beech. Too smooth for hackberry, but end grain shot would help.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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Mainiac Matt

4046 posts in 994 days


#10 posted 06-30-2012 04:11 AM

I’m goin with Beach…

I have several on our property and the oblong circle splotches of lighter color on the bark are on many of them. I think it’s a type of moss that likes the smooth silver gray bark.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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BigYin

234 posts in 1082 days


#11 posted 06-30-2012 05:15 AM

Is there a difference in wood quality between European and American Sycamore ?
If quarter sawn it should be stable, you might even get flame or riple

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

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WDHLT15

1140 posts in 1141 days


#12 posted 06-30-2012 11:25 AM

Yes. European sycamore is actually in the Maple family.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1651 days


#13 posted 06-30-2012 03:20 PM

I don’t know, it looks awful similar to the Sycamore trees in my front yard.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

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WDHLT15

1140 posts in 1141 days


#14 posted 07-01-2012 02:53 AM

We need more information to be definitive.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4022 posts in 1045 days


#15 posted 07-01-2012 05:05 PM

There are 3 species of sycamore in America and all have scaly bark. That looks nothing like any sycamore I’ve ever seen. Looks more like beech but I’m not very familiar with that tree.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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