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Forum topic by tyskkvinna posted 06-29-2012 01:12 AM 774 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1651 days


06-29-2012 01:12 AM

I am doing some CNC carvings on green lumber. It was a living tree less than two months ago.

I am not concerned about cracking or checking or any of that—for what I’m doing, any of this will simply be “features”.

What I AM wondering is about the tooling, feeds and speeds. Any of you that use a CNC ever run green lumber through? Any tips? I was burning the wood a little.

If you run a regular router on green wood is there any suggestions there I can use? It’s kind of new territory for me.

I am going straight from log to carving, so drying it is kind of out of the question :) (Not going to wait several years to carve them)

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt


9 replies so far

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SASmith

1597 posts in 1652 days


#1 posted 06-29-2012 05:42 PM

What kind of wood is it you are trying to carve?
Is the bit still sharp?
Are you using a variable speed router?

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

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tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1651 days


#2 posted 06-29-2012 05:44 PM

Mulberry and Ash. (Not at the same time obviously)

The bit is super sharp. I’m using insert tooling and change it out as necessary.

The router can do anything from 2k to 24k. I usually cut around 20k.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

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KenBry

449 posts in 1113 days


#3 posted 06-29-2012 05:50 PM

Drying doesn’t have to take years, Depending on the log a lumber yard might be able to dry it in a kiln.

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

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SASmith

1597 posts in 1652 days


#4 posted 06-29-2012 05:55 PM

Wish I could be of more help.
My only suggestion would be to vary the RPMs to see if that helps prevent burning.

Hopefully someone else will chime in with a solution to your problem.

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

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DS

2131 posts in 1086 days


#5 posted 06-29-2012 07:26 PM

Burning means the chip load is too low.
To increase the chip load, either reduce the RPMs on the spindle, or, increase the feed rate IPMs.
If you have a load meter on the spindle, you could tell if the feed rate is maxed out already. Too fast and you risk breaking the bit.
I’d try a lower rpm on the spindle first.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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DS

2131 posts in 1086 days


#6 posted 06-29-2012 07:37 PM

The “Goldilocks” procedure:

In a production situation it is important to test cutter performance in real world circumstances.
I will buy 3 new bits whenever a new material is being cut or a new tool is being tried. I fully expect to ruin 2 of the bits. This allows me to bracket the cutter for optimum performance for long-term production.

Too slow burns up the bit
Too fast fractures the bit.
In the middle is JUST RIGHT.

Before this procedure, my operator would never thought of running 1100 ipm for his outline cuts, but, with the proper high speed tooling, this is totally acheivable. It took the Goldilocks test to prove it. Now, production on the CNC is almost twice what it used to be.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1651 days


#7 posted 06-30-2012 11:18 AM

Out of curiosity, what kind of parameters do you run with 1100 ipm? I sometimes run at 1000ipm on acrylic.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

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DS

2131 posts in 1086 days


#8 posted 07-03-2012 09:24 PM

1100 ipm is high speed tooling. We were cutting 1/2” PBC Melamine. It was a 3/8” diameter three flute down spiral chipbreaker/finisher at 20k rpm. Most standard tooling runs 400 to 600 ipm.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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Jim Jakosh

11549 posts in 1771 days


#9 posted 07-04-2012 10:59 PM

Hi Lis. sorry I can’t help you there but DS251 seems to have the know how on the CNC. ..........Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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