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Forum topic by HermanKuhn posted 06-28-2012 10:53 PM 1219 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HermanKuhn

7 posts in 1617 days


06-28-2012 10:53 PM

I found this great little horse on a junk heap for $4, restored it and would like to make a few, I wondering if anyone has some opinions on tool choice, especially for shaping, I’m on a limited budget and would like to start doing them by hand mostly, not with production equipment at first.

I am thinking about :

1) Joining the body halves by plane(s) and dowels. I don’t know which planes would be appropriate though.
2) Then Jigsawing the body, legs and rockers to pattern, but shaping the edges then?? Looks menacing.

spokeshave? rasps?

Overall, what do you all think?







10 replies so far

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cabmaker

1502 posts in 2268 days


#1 posted 06-29-2012 01:41 AM

Certainly doable, however the horse you show has been machined to a great extent. Looks as if it had been followed up with easing the edges to soften it up. But yes you could easily do it with hand tools. Bandsaw would be helpful. Enjoy JB

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HermanKuhn

7 posts in 1617 days


#2 posted 06-29-2012 02:40 PM

And what hand tools would you recommend to blend the edges? Would a rasp be too slow? A spokeshave?

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cabmaker

1502 posts in 2268 days


#3 posted 06-29-2012 08:16 PM

Mostly a surform is probably what I would use. And a rasp here and there. I dont think that would get past me without a little bit of spindle sander too. Good luck !

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DS

2151 posts in 1879 days


#4 posted 06-29-2012 08:30 PM

This is just 2x material that was cut, either by bandsaw or jig saw and then a router with a couple different radius roundover bits to make the edges. (Large diameter on the outside edge, smaller diameter on the inside edge)

Very little extra work in this—no blending that I can see.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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cabmaker

1502 posts in 2268 days


#5 posted 06-29-2012 08:36 PM

By blending, I think the man is refering to easing. I think anyone can see there is no blending from part to part

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DS

2151 posts in 1879 days


#6 posted 06-29-2012 08:41 PM

Yup… looks like a 3/4” radius roundover on the outside and a 3/8” radius roundover on the inside. No blending, part to part or anywhere else. The bumps on the legs are in the profile and rounded over.

This looks like a quickie project using an old 2X10.
No planing, no filing. Bandsaw, Router, ROS and a couple hours in the garage.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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HermanKuhn

7 posts in 1617 days


#7 posted 06-29-2012 10:02 PM

Thanks 5251, yes I’m new and should’ve said easing. Would the routing then, especially of the legs be done on a table with no fence?? Seems precarious to run the router over top of a small piece. Also, what about joining the body halves, how should that be done?

Thanks also cabmaker for the hand tool info. A surform to knock down bulk, a rasp to snug it up and sanding to finish, I guess that’s the idea. How would one join the body halves?

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3036 days


#8 posted 06-29-2012 10:15 PM

Herman
you can do the roundover either on a router table or hand held depending on the type of router you have. If you don’t feel good about doing it with a hand held router then go the router table route assuming you have one.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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DS

2151 posts in 1879 days


#9 posted 06-29-2012 10:51 PM

I assume the hody halves refers to the neck joint in front of the saddle.
This could be done with dowells, biscuits, butterflies, dominos… or just about anything else you are inclined to use. Some here would favor a spline joint. The photo almost looks like a corregated fastener shot from a nailer.

Since I have a nice self-centering dowelling jig it is short work for me to use dowells. Your mileage may vary.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1879 days


#10 posted 06-29-2012 10:55 PM

You can use a hand router, but the workpiece should be properly secured on your workbench.
My router table has a guide pin for running conours like this.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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