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How to fix slight warp in cabinet door

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Forum topic by Marlys posted 06-27-2012 04:00 PM 12446 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marlys

23 posts in 1620 days


06-27-2012 04:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cabinet doors warp inset

First time cabinet building project. I have one door that has a 1/16 warp on one corner. I probably got too aggressive with the glue clamp. They are inset doors and all the adjustments with Blum hinges haven’t worked. Any tips on fixing this slight warp?

-- The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits. ~ Albert Einstein.


17 replies so far

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DS

2151 posts in 1880 days


#1 posted 06-27-2012 04:16 PM

Firstly, let me say that 1/16” is usually within the adjustment range of ALL Blum hinges—even the Compact series. If you are using the adjustment range to compensate for an improper mounting location, then perhaps there is no more room to adjust for the warped door. Most door manufacturer’s will not consider +/- 1/16” twist as a defect. To adjust for 1/16” twist, you need merely to split the difference, 1/32” in adjacent corners. (The Blum CLIP series will adjust +/- 2mm side-to-side/up-and-down, and +3mm, – 2mm for in-and-out.)

Secondly, you can manipulate a door by using clamping stress in the opposite direction. While under clamping pressure, (not too so much to break the joints), you can heat, then cool the door and it will retain some of the opposite twist from the clamps when cooled. In Arizona, heating a door is as simple as placing it outside in the shade for about an hour. (It will be 113 degrees today.)

To clamp the door, you can usually use a piece of plywood with a diagonally mounted board in the opposite direction of the twist. You will want to protect the door from scratches, or marring from the clamps and the jig. If you clamp too far, you could impose an opposite twist as well, so slight and gradual adjustments are the best approach.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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waho6o9

7166 posts in 2037 days


#2 posted 06-27-2012 04:23 PM

If paired, is it possible to install on the other side?

Maybe less noticeable.

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Marlys

23 posts in 1620 days


#3 posted 06-27-2012 04:29 PM

Thanks for reply. Am trying the clamp and heat method right now. It is heading towards 106° today. Only solution I could think of. Don’t want to use a catch or magnet to pull this one corner into line. All other corner and sides are where they need to be so I don’t think remounting hinge will work.

-- The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits. ~ Albert Einstein.

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DS

2151 posts in 1880 days


#4 posted 06-27-2012 04:31 PM

How big is this door?

If it is a tall pantry door, it may never behave without stiffeners and/or magnetic catch.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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Marlys

23 posts in 1620 days


#5 posted 06-27-2012 04:45 PM

The door is not that big. 26” tall x 20” wide. It does meet up with another door, but they are inset and am trying to make them flush with face of cabinet. The problem corner is about 1/16+ proud of face when all other sides and corners are good. Heading back to shop in a few minutes to see if heat has fixed my problem…it hasn’t been good for anything else :)

-- The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits. ~ Albert Einstein.

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DS

2151 posts in 1880 days


#6 posted 06-27-2012 05:31 PM

Be sure to let it cool before taking the clamps off. Heat softens the lignon in the wood, but it will need to cool in the new position. There will be some spring back to it and if you take it out of the clamps hot, it may spring back to the original position.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2528 days


#7 posted 06-27-2012 05:59 PM

If you’ve used up the adjustment travel in your hinge, move your hinge plate. I always make sure that all three adjustments are centered before I install the plates which takes care of 99% of the adjustments. If one doesn’t work, remove the plate, glue some toothpicks in the holes, use a chisel to shave them flush, and re-drill your mounting holes to move the plate in the direction you need.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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DS

2151 posts in 1880 days


#8 posted 06-28-2012 04:39 PM

Marlys, how did your door turn out?
We want to know of your success, or, otherwise.
Thanks

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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Marlys

23 posts in 1620 days


#9 posted 06-28-2012 07:38 PM

There is no joy here. I have been quite cautious about clamping to get it flush. Maybe I should try direct sun (more heat) and more aggressive clamp technique.

-- The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits. ~ Albert Einstein.

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Marlys

23 posts in 1620 days


#10 posted 06-29-2012 03:40 AM

The first pic is of the problematic door. I know….not a big deal to some, but it is to me. The second pic is of the cabinet bank that will be topped with countertop and have overhang for seating.

-- The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits. ~ Albert Einstein.

View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1880 days


#11 posted 06-29-2012 04:21 PM

Dude, you have a six way adjustable hinge on there.
You should be able to adjust this out.
Pop the lower left of the door out a bit and the top right goes in a bit. It will be far less noticable at the bottom.

In six months the doors will not be the same either. It’s all about the adjustment.
Heck, your doors look like they’re still raw— You could sand 1/32” off the face of that corner and get away with it too.

If the edge is rounded slightly, 1/16” to 1/8” profile, you won’t notice it as much either.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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DS

2151 posts in 1880 days


#12 posted 06-29-2012 04:23 PM

It just occurred to me that this could also be your cabinet on a twist.
Are you sure it’s the door that’s warped?

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#13 posted 06-29-2012 04:30 PM

DS has given you good advise ,the one thing I would add is to leave it clamped at least over night.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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DS

2151 posts in 1880 days


#14 posted 06-29-2012 04:31 PM

Riddle:
A cabinetmaker and an engineer are in an enclosed room at on end. At the other end of the room is a beautiful girl.
A sign on the wall states that they can approach the girl, but, they can only move half the distance at a time.

Q: Who gets the girl?

A: The cabinetmaker.

The engineer never tries, because, only being able to move half the distance at a time, you can never get there.
The cabinetmaker states, “Close enough for all practical purposes.”

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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ChuckV

2880 posts in 2987 days


#15 posted 06-29-2012 05:45 PM

And the mathematician says, “I know that the infinite series 1/2 + 1/4 + 1/8 +... converges to 1 – get out of my way!”

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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