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Craftsman Table Saw Rehab

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Forum topic by Don Broussard posted 06-27-2012 01:08 AM 5202 views 3 times favorited 102 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Don Broussard

2136 posts in 998 days


06-27-2012 01:08 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw refurbishing

I was looking for a regular user table saw, and someone gave me a Craftsman table saw (Model 113.298240). The saw had been outside in a field for a few years, and when I asked about it, the owner gave it to me. It was painted black, including the cast iron top and stamped steel wings (someone was thoughtful enough to cover the saw’s nameplate with duct tape before painting). I am guessing that the blade bevel indicator was removed for painting and was not reinstalled, so there’s no indication of blade angle. The case and stand are dented but structurally sound. I disconnected the belt, and when I plugged the motor in, it started right up with a little vibration (not unexpected). I installed the belt and the blade runs smoothly. The bevel and blade height adjusting wheels were locked up. Today, I removed the wings and stripped the paint off the top and the wings, and I got the two adjusting wheels to unfreeze. The cast iron top is still flat with only minor rust spots—I fixed those with a wire wheel on my hand grinder. There is no miter gauge, nor is there any safety equipment mounted on the saw. The insert is mounted to the table with a stripped-out Philips head screw (go figure) and I haven’t been able to get the blade off the arbor yet. Finally, the fence would probably have to be replaced. I downloaded the owner’s manual this morning.

While I would like to resurrect the saw for regular use, I also don’t want to invest more than it’s worth in time, money and effort. Based on its current condition, do you judge that it’s worth the effort and advise proceeding with putting the saw back in service? What other things should I check before proceeding? If I do fix and use this saw, one of my first projects will be to make a crosscut sled.

I value the opinions of fellow LJs, so here’s my thanks in advance for comments and advice.

Don Broussard

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!


102 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5601 posts in 2122 days


#1 posted 06-27-2012 01:37 AM

Don – It’s probably got some potential, but some pics would be helpful so we can evaluate what you’ve got….

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Don Broussard

2136 posts in 998 days


#2 posted 06-27-2012 01:54 AM

I am having trouble posting pictures. If this one works, I’ll post more.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

2136 posts in 998 days


#3 posted 06-27-2012 02:00 AM

Hope these help with the evaluations!

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

4452 posts in 1075 days


#4 posted 06-27-2012 02:02 AM

Set the blade perpendicular to the table with a reliable square and don’t bother replacing the angle indicator, as it’s not accurate enough to be useful anyways.

If you need to rip a bevel, you’ll want to set the blade angle with a combo. Square

The paint probably saved the top. I’d strip it now and see what’s underneath.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1836 posts in 1743 days


#5 posted 06-27-2012 02:05 AM

The price was right.
Bit of cleaning and the main cast should come clean. The stamped metal wings can be replaced. If you can free up the screws to raise and lower and tilt you will have a start.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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Mainiac Matt

4452 posts in 1075 days


#6 posted 06-27-2012 02:05 AM

GEt a pair of PALS and it’ll make the alignment process go much smoother

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5601 posts in 2122 days


#7 posted 06-27-2012 02:09 AM

I’d go for it. It’s got the nice metal hand wheels. The top should clean up nicely….get the paint and rust of it, bolt the body back together. If the motor runs smoothly and the mechanism loosen up (I’d try something like PB Blaster), you can buy a good Delta T2 fence for ~ $153 shipped from Tools-plus.com. Get it aligned and put a decent blade on it. For well under $200 you’ll have yourself a pretty decent saw.

Keep us posted on your progress!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View NormG's profile

NormG

4510 posts in 1750 days


#8 posted 06-27-2012 02:12 AM

Wow, great deal, invest the time to clean up, get the pals as previously suggested and use a wixey to set your angles when needed, goog luck with the rebuild

-- Norman

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

2136 posts in 998 days


#9 posted 06-27-2012 02:15 AM

Thanks for the advice. The casting did come clean pretty easily, and it’s nice and flat. I will need to replace some of the bolts which broke off during disassembly. New belt, new blade, and then alignment. If all goes well, I will put some effort into polishing the hand wheels too. Then, it’s on to making the sled. I have several sleds favorited already.

I’ll post updates as they become available.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View DonnyD's profile

DonnyD

49 posts in 920 days


#10 posted 06-27-2012 03:26 AM

my saw is very similar to this, the best thing i ever did to it was get one of those link belts for it. and buy a wixey digital angle gauge .put a good fence on it and a good blade I like frued and check the bearing first no clicking

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5601 posts in 2122 days


#11 posted 06-27-2012 11:57 AM

The link belts are nice….if you opt not to invest that much, I’ve got a belt you can have for the cost of shipping. Send me a message if you want it.

The Freud Diablo blades are among the best bangs for the buck. Infinity, Forrest, Freud Industrial, CMT, Tenryu, Amana, Ridge Carbide, and the DeWalt Precision Trim series are also good choices. I’d avoid names like Workforce, Irwin Marathon/Sprint series, Vermont American, HF, DW’s construction series, Oldham’s contractor series, Avanti/Avanti Pro, Ryobi, and HF.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View toolie's profile

toolie

1773 posts in 1375 days


#12 posted 06-27-2012 12:35 PM

don…....i have a c-man faceplate for that saw (displays the bevel angle). PM me if interested.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

2136 posts in 998 days


#13 posted 06-27-2012 01:11 PM

Thanks again for all the advice and encouragement. I have attached a few progress pictures. By the way, I failed to mention in my initial post that the table saw package also came with a welded steel mobile base with locking casters.

@ssnvet—I agree with you about the bevel indicator. I just use mine to show when the blade is NOT at 90 degrees. I might also have to look into a wixey—had not heard that word/company before.

@toolie—I found another face plate from another source. Thanks for the offer. As noted above, it might turn out to be a “decoration” anyway.


Cast iron top with paint removed and wire brushed. I still need to get the paint out of the miter slots.


Stamped steel wings with paint removed and wire brushed. You can see that the edge of the wing closer to the camera has some kinks in it. I suspect that the saw was “deposited” into the field by dropping the truck’s tailgate, backing up fast and stopping hard . . .


Picture shows Philips screw head holding insert in place, and yes, the rounded screw head is above the cast iron table. I will probably need to drill that screw out and install a proper countersunk screw in its place.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View IrreverentJack's profile

IrreverentJack

724 posts in 1589 days


#14 posted 06-27-2012 03:09 PM

+1 on the PALS. Instead of machined pulley$ and a link belt I bought a kit like this off Ebay. The pulleys and ribbon belt are original on a Ridgid but fits my Craftsman. It was cheaper a few years ago, but still seems to be a good deal. -Jack

View oltexasboy's profile

oltexasboy

11 posts in 918 days


#15 posted 06-27-2012 05:34 PM

Retired mechanic here, before you drill the screw out if you soak it in my secret formula for removing rusted screws.”Campho-Phenique” . I have had screws that I just didn’t want to run the risk of drilling out because of their location and I will put the CP soak on them some times for 2 or 3 days before I attempt to remove them. I am very seldom disappointed. You should also take a phillips screwdriver set squarely on the screw and tap it sharply a couple of times . Good luck.

showing 1 through 15 of 102 replies

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