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Shortening a long miter saw to make a tenon saw?

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Forum topic by Brett posted 769 days ago 621 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brett

620 posts in 1286 days


769 days ago

Crazy idea about backsaws:

I come across more old miter saws that are about 22” inches long than I do tenon saws that are about 14” long. Apart from the questions of collectibility, TPI, and rip-vs-crosscut teeth, is there any reason why I couldn’t buy an old miter saw and cut it down to about 14” to use as a tenon saw?

-- More tools, fewer machines.


3 replies so far

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Loren

7269 posts in 2251 days


#1 posted 769 days ago

The nicer old tenon saws sometimes have a thicker and heavier
back spine which concentrates mass over the cut. The old
dado and tenon saws tend to be lighter in the spine to make
them easier to handle, I suppose… but perhaps to cut manufacturing
costs as well.

So you could do it but you might be investing the effort in a tool
that isn’t made to the same standard as a tenon saw.

I’d recommend you put your tool building energy into making a
bowsaw. They are stunningly versatile.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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mtenterprises

815 posts in 1296 days


#2 posted 769 days ago

8-) I’ve got a plasma cutter that’ll slice off as much of any saw you want to shorten and leave you a nice smooth edge 8-). Just some fun there!
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

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Infernal2

104 posts in 801 days


#3 posted 767 days ago

I guess it depends on what you want to use the saw for and if the plate thickness will lend itself well. Tooling wise, in my opinion, I don’t see anything wrong with it, the mechanics will still be the same as long as you remember to leave enough back to close the front. As Loren noted, you might be changing the essential nature of the saw and ending up with something you didn’t intend. It will cut, but how well?

Also a + on the bow saw idea. I just hacked together a new bow saw (out of aluminum) for camping and while its designed to be rough and rugged, I could easily use it in my shop.

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