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Mahogany door repair

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Forum topic by moriartii posted 752 days ago 1059 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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moriartii

22 posts in 752 days


752 days ago

Hello-
First time poster but bit of a lurker. These forums were very helpful in my quest to purchase a table saw, ended up with a Grizzly 0661!

Anyway I need some help or bounce this question off the group collective:

I have a mahogany front door, that due to improper installation and my lack of fore site need length added to it.

The prehung door was installed canted so I removed the door and planed the bottom so the weather stripping would work. I am now at a point where I am going to install a new frame properly and refinish the door correctly.

The question i have is I need to add 1/4 of an inch to the bottom of the door to make it an even 79 1/4 ”. My plan is as follows:

-Flush cut the bottom of the door at 79”.
-Take another piece of 1/4 to 1/2 mahogany and glue it to the bottom of the door using Titebond III and 1/2 spiral dowels.
-Using four ratchet straps around door for clamping pressure
-Finish door with Epifanes Dutch mahogany stain and Epifanes varnish

Thoughts on this? From the research I have done I believe it will work, I just wanted to put this out to more knowledgeable people than I.

Cheers
K


12 replies so far

View Rex B's profile

Rex B

307 posts in 837 days


#1 posted 752 days ago

It sounds to me like it should work fine, as long as the bottom of the door is bare unfinished wood. I’ve heard Epifanes is really good stuff as well.

-- Rex

View moriartii's profile

moriartii

22 posts in 752 days


#2 posted 752 days ago

Yes once I trim flush the door it will be fresh wood. Plan on picking up a 1/2” x 1 3/4” x 37” piece of mahogany from Woodcraft or Rockler.
Cheers
K

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3034 posts in 1262 days


#3 posted 752 days ago

I have successfully done exactly what you describe. My door is an antique and it is painted. That helps cover the joint. I think you are talking about an exterior door or front entrance door. What about a taller threshold? Those can be pretty thick and even adjustable. Something to think about.

View moriartii's profile

moriartii

22 posts in 752 days


#4 posted 752 days ago

NICE! Glad to hear it is possible!

I have thought about the joint issue. I think I can get away with it with sanding, help blend the joint in.

Yes this is an exterior front door.

I have the option of using an adjustable threshold but it only adjusts up a 1/4”, I would like to stay in the middle of that range if I can so I still need to build up the door.

My other option is to actually move the threshold up 1/4” in the jamb legs prior to install but then I need to cut the legs OR come up with a sill plate of sorts.

Building up the bottom of the door seems to be the easiest option.

Cheers
K

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1437 days


#5 posted 752 days ago

I’m guessing that you’ll have a flat-grain to flat-grain glue joint on the bottom, so the spiral dowels, which won’t get much of a purchase on your 1/4” piece, are superfluous. Further, they won’t draw the pieces together.

If your two surfaces are a nice fit, just glueing and clamping with masking tape will work.

Finally, I’d suggest you bevel the edges of the add-on back just a few degrees. The piece will look intentional, and color differences will be minimized.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View moriartii's profile

moriartii

22 posts in 752 days


#6 posted 752 days ago

Lee-
In regard to your post, I think I may use the dowels as alignment more than anything. My build up piece is going to be 3/4 thick. My plan is to dowel/glue it to the door and clamp it using ratchet tie downs. When dry I will cut to the appropriate 1/4 length.

The concern in doing this is I dont want the joint to move on me when clamping AND when ultimately finished.

I see what you are saying, basically call the add on piece out and sort of hide it by doing so.

Cheers
K

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moriartii

22 posts in 752 days


#7 posted 752 days ago

Also wanted to thank everyone for their input and advice!!!!
Very much appreciated!
Cheers
K

View doughan's profile

doughan

96 posts in 1178 days


#8 posted 752 days ago

If possible cut the jamb down to the height of the door…..patches always look like mistakes

View reedwood's profile

reedwood

858 posts in 1263 days


#9 posted 752 days ago

Hold on there…..

this is a style and rail, raised panel STAINED mahogany door, right?

...which means you will be glueing to 5 1/5” of end grain on either side of an exterior solid wood door – right?

This technically is not a good idea. Yea the guys are right – it may work and maybe it won’t fail, but the joint will definitely show – unless you have some kind of wrap around weather strip that covers it.

Then you said you are reinstalling the door in a new jam -

So why arn’t you raising the threshold or cutting down the jam 1/4” and avoiding all this work which will look like a BIG mistake?

Weather strips come in all different sizes too. Could you buy a thicker one?

-- mark

View moriartii's profile

moriartii

22 posts in 752 days


#10 posted 752 days ago

Reed-
You are correct on the door and the 5+” of end grain. No am not using a wrap around weather strip.

I was shying away from the threshold raise idea because I assumed it would effect my brick mold and casing.

That being said and a previous post, I emailed my supplier and specifically asked if they could raise it for me when making it.

If they cant, I will do it myself as, in the end, raising it makes the most sense!

Cheers-
K

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1437 days


#11 posted 752 days ago

This piece will stay. Particularly if you use polyurethane glue to adhere it.

I can’t see what the aesthetic downside is of glueing a 1/4 inch thick piece on the bottom of the door.

Where are your eyes when you approach an exterior door? Himmm?

This is being way overwrought. It will be fine, just fine. And I’d rather see that than have the threshold raised up. That’s a more naked fix than the strip, beveled back.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1147 posts in 1211 days


#12 posted 752 days ago

Why not just cut the case and lower the entire door. Then shim the top of the case. Use some over size molding and you are golden.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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