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HELP! Mid-project screw up...

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Forum topic by Milo posted 06-20-2012 04:42 PM 907 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Milo

851 posts in 1977 days


06-20-2012 04:42 PM

I made a mid-project change on a piece safe (I’m going to put raised panels on the sides rather than tin) and I need to make some rabbits along the already completed interior sections of the side walls. I don’t really want to take these things apart to do it. What would be the best way to cut these rabbits out? Router table (this is antique pine and does NOT seem to like the router bits much) or table saw dado set?

Thanks,

Milo

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...


19 replies so far

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2306 days


#1 posted 06-20-2012 05:01 PM

if you don’t want to take it apart (maybe I’m not seeing this right visually) I would stay away from power tools if you don’t want to mess it up – a router plane, or chisels will do just fine – albeit will take a bit more time and less chance of screwing things up

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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Milo

851 posts in 1977 days


#2 posted 06-20-2012 05:07 PM

I need to go make some pictures….

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

View William's profile

William

9045 posts in 1500 days


#3 posted 06-20-2012 05:13 PM

If I understand what you’re doing correctly, use a slot cutter with a bearing to ride along the inside sirface of your already made frame. Cut the slot all around the four inside edges. Then you’ll need to use a sharp chisel to square up the slot in the corners.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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jdmaher

281 posts in 1238 days


#4 posted 06-20-2012 05:21 PM

You have the rails & stiles of the side panels already glued up? But you didn’t make rabbets on the rails and stiles to accept the panel?

OR

You have the panels made, but need to put a rabbett on them to fit the rails and stiles?

Either way, I’d probably use a hand-held (but eletric) router. Multiple passes, taking just a little at a time. If your worried about a clean edge, score the wood with a box cutter before you start routing.

Or am I not understanding the problem?

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

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Tedster

2271 posts in 869 days


#5 posted 06-20-2012 05:34 PM

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Milo

851 posts in 1977 days


#6 posted 06-20-2012 05:48 PM

Here are a few pictures…

Here is the side panel of the pie safe. I hope to put raised panel in it.

Here’s a close up.

And here’s is a panel in work that’s going into it.

I hope to cut the panels so they will fit evenly into rabbits cut into the pie safe sides.

Does this make better sense?

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

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Milo

851 posts in 1977 days


#7 posted 06-20-2012 06:08 PM

William, I fear a slot cutter would be too big for my purposes. I only want about 3/8 deep a rabbit.

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

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jmos

681 posts in 1028 days


#8 posted 06-20-2012 06:13 PM

Milo, I hate to say it, but I think you’re going to have to take at least one of the stiles off (did you glue, or just screw?) You can use a slot cutting router bit and run it around the insides of the frame where you want the panels, then chisel out the corners.

However, you’ll still need to insert the panels, and the best way (really only way if you want it in a groove all the way around) to do that will be with one of the stiles removed. If you already glued, I’m afraid I’m stumped.

Edit – you can get slot cutters with different size guide bearings to control depth of cut

-- John

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7574 posts in 2306 days


#9 posted 06-20-2012 06:14 PM

I’m not sure I quite understand but here goes.

I would probably just rabbet them from the front or back with
a bearing-guided 1/2” rabbet router cutter. Then put the
panels in there… glue or nail them as needed and use applied
mouldings to cover the rabbet. This is a very easy way to
make doors and panels and one of my favorite techniques.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1078 days


#10 posted 06-20-2012 06:15 PM

Milo, a good rabbiting router bit and a hand held router will do the trick nicely.
To avoid tear out, start out with a shallow cut and make three or four passes until you get to your final depth. Jim’s suggestion to score the line with a box cutter is a good one, if you’re really concerned for tear out.

You will need a sharp chisel to clean the corners, but this is a manageable situtation.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View GrandpaLen's profile (online now)

GrandpaLen

1525 posts in 930 days


#11 posted 06-20-2012 06:15 PM

Milo,

You might consider making a regular Raised Panel door with narrow framing and just insert them into your existing openings, IMHO, would spare you from disassembling your frames or trying to cut a groove/slot in them at this point.
-or-
Cut a 1/2” deep x 1/4” wide rabbit on the inside of the opening, place your panel into the rabbit and use 1/4” x 1/4” strips to secure them to the inside rabbited frame.

Best Wishes for your solution. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View crippledcarpenter's profile

crippledcarpenter

19 posts in 1105 days


#12 posted 06-20-2012 06:17 PM

are the rails and styles glued and screwed or just screwed?

just a responce to using a router bit on the pine, if it is going to be difficult to rabbit the back you are going to have a snot of a time with a raised panel bit.

-- haste makes firewood.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7574 posts in 2306 days


#13 posted 06-20-2012 06:17 PM

For that matter you could skip the rabbeting of the frame
altogether and use applied mouldings front and back.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1627 days


#14 posted 06-20-2012 06:23 PM

I was going to say what Loren just said, plant a small bolection molding on the front and slip it at the back.

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Milo

851 posts in 1977 days


#15 posted 06-20-2012 06:28 PM

Loren,

You give me an idea. But instead of molding, I’ll fit the panels and simple screw them in from behind with small hard board tabs. I can hide them under the shelves, and run a bead of glue around the panel edges to help hold them in places.

THANKS EVERYONE!

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

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