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Choosing a Finish/Sealing

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Forum topic by RJH311 posted 06-19-2012 03:35 PM 878 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RJH311

43 posts in 1784 days


06-19-2012 03:35 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing

So i’m trying to figure out a good process for finishing some recent projects. I’ve been reading some books but would like the opinion of the LJ community. I’m going to use a polyurethane finish and rub it out with some wax but my question is whether or not I should use a sealer first. I’ve already applied a couple coats of danish oil to the boxes i’m finishing so its not much of a question as to what i’ll do with those, but i’ve also got a shoe rack with no finish on it. Would I benefit from applying a few coats of danish oil as a sealer before the polyurethane? Is danish oil a decent choice for sealing? Will it make a difference? Steer me in the right direction…


7 replies so far

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1829 days


#1 posted 06-19-2012 04:33 PM

Never used Danish oil for sealing, but I have used a 1# cut of dewaxed shellac with very good results. Very simple to apply. Plus, I don’t know of a topcoat that isn’t compatible with it.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4448 posts in 3420 days


#2 posted 06-19-2012 04:47 PM

Why poly? Is the project a high-use item?
My favorite is a shellac (de-waxed) sealer with a wiping varnish top coat(s). After the varnish has cured, wool and wax.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1707 days


#3 posted 06-19-2012 05:00 PM

Correct me if I am wrong, but when I use the term “sealant” I always envision it as a sanding sealer – so when you sand down your finish you don’t remove any color you’ve applied to the wood.

I don’t think you will need the poly unless it is very high use as Bill suggested. Commercial danish oils (Watco) contain poly already. I have finished a few projects with just danish oil and wax. A nice thing about an oiled and waxed finish is it can be repaired easily. If you get some deep scratches or scuffs in poly as the years go by, your only option is to sand it all down and start over.

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1829 days


#4 posted 06-19-2012 05:18 PM

I may be wrong, but I don’t believe that is the purpose of a sanding sealer (to prevent you from sanding through the previous layer). I was always under the impression it was to seal to larger pores of the wood to prevent them from absorbing more finish than the smaller ones, creating a more uniform finish. I think you can do this before or after stain. Shellac sanding sealer can also seal one finish coat from the next. I’ve used it before stains and dyes to prevent blotching, and to prevent the porous wood from soaking up more finish in some spots. After you apply it, you sand it back, leaving just the pores filled.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 1724 days


#5 posted 06-19-2012 05:22 PM

I used Watco Danish oil with a wipe-on poly on my desktop, but for other items I usually use just the Danish oil and it provides enough protection. If it is a high-wear item, I’d probably put poly on it. If not, you can just do without it.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1707 days


#6 posted 06-19-2012 05:31 PM

I guess everyone has their own terminology BinghamtonEd. I call what you described stain or wood conditioner. Is there other types of sanding sealers other than dewaxed shellac?

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1829 days


#7 posted 06-19-2012 05:37 PM

I think when you put it down before the first coat, and sand it back, it works as a wood conditioner. After that, it works as a barrier between coats, not to prevent sandthrough so much as to separate incompatible finish types.. Just happens to be sandable. I think we’re just picking two ways to skin the same cat :)

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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