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My new old plane

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Forum topic by Bearpie posted 06-17-2012 03:31 AM 1990 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bearpie

2601 posts in 2479 days


06-17-2012 03:31 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plane curves

I went yard sale hopping/shopping/browsing and found this little gem in a box of planes. The other planes were not in very good shape or had parts missing. The tag on it was marked $25.00 and when I went to pay for it, the lady asked if that will be all? When I said “yes”, she said you can have it for $15.00! Needless to say I didn’t argue with her! My question is, What is this plane called and who makes it? There is no identification marks at all on this plane. No numbers either! Everything turns easily even though it is dirty and rusty. It seems the previous owner took good care of it and kept it oiled/greased up before he passed away.

Would this be called a curving plane?

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL


17 replies so far

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ShaneA

6471 posts in 2059 days


#1 posted 06-17-2012 03:38 AM

I believe it is a compass plane. And you basically stole it. Nice find. I think it is a stanley, but not certain.

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poopiekat

4224 posts in 3195 days


#2 posted 06-17-2012 03:45 AM

The forward knob does indeed look like a Stanley, probably a #113. Look closer at the front knob for an inscription, they are hard to read. Jeez, I paid almost $90 for mine, I’d buy them for $15 all day if I could!!! Nice find, you’ll enjoy tuning and using it!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Nicky

695 posts in 3552 days


#3 posted 06-17-2012 03:46 AM

It is a Stanley compass plane and you scored big.

FWW just did an artical and shows this plane. $50 to $200.

-- Nicky

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joshtank

224 posts in 2434 days


#4 posted 06-17-2012 10:47 AM

a compass plane! very nice!

this page has details on the stenleys to help you with identification and info.
http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan12.htm

-- Josh - Jacksonville, FL - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6eXmOxkM10zI0d-njOHeRQ

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dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#5 posted 06-17-2012 01:32 PM

That’s cool! Was it used by wheelwrights?

Yesterday I picked up a newer Stanley low angle block plane, a very clean No. 4 Bailey with grooved platen, No. 4 Handyman, No. 4 sized generic with Disston blade, and a clean No. 7 Stanley for – $37.

I also picked up a rusty corner chisel (each ‘leg’ is about 3/4 inch) with no handle for $2. I have never seen a corner chisel before, I hope it cleans up well as it is a bit pitted.

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David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2458 days


#6 posted 06-17-2012 03:05 PM

I have one of the newer model from Record that I picked up just because it was cool and a bargain. Never have had a use for it. I might feel different if I were making rounded tabletops, arched doors or windows and the like which are it’s main use.

dhazelton:

Not likely by wheelwrights. They generally had specialized tools much like coopers had. They also worked in really nasty grained woods that don’t plane well but were strong in different directions. Also, the compass planes don’t really do a very tight curve. Much easier to just spin a wheel on a lathe.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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Ted

2785 posts in 1672 days


#7 posted 06-17-2012 03:17 PM

Nice find Bearpie.. makes me want to go yardsaling. I hope to see it when you get it cleaned up.

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.

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Bearpie

2601 posts in 2479 days


#8 posted 06-17-2012 04:45 PM

Thanks Josh for the web site. About halfway down I found my plane and now that I seen the “picture” I realized that the “push” handle on my plane has broken off. :-( However it is still a good find and a bargain!

Thanks everyone for your input and well wishes!

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

View woodworker59's profile

woodworker59

560 posts in 1662 days


#9 posted 06-17-2012 04:47 PM

Are you at all interested in selling it? would love to get my hands on it.. just throw a price at me.. thanks.. )Papa

-- Papa@papaswoodworking.com

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poopiekat

4224 posts in 3195 days


#10 posted 06-17-2012 05:10 PM

My #113 will do the inside of a 7-inch radius.
005-7
I wonder what the original owner did with this plane? Cool that this design enabled users to do both the inside AND outside curves of woodworking project! I like that ‘Rococo’ design on the knobs, where the heck does that come from?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2458 days


#11 posted 06-17-2012 06:13 PM

Poopiekat:

Interesting, I don’t think my Record plane will take that tight of a radius. Sad that most modern makers don’t do the little embellishments. More the sterile “utilitarian” I guess. Kind of silly seeing that averaged over the product line, it adds very little to the price.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2576 days


#12 posted 06-17-2012 06:25 PM

nice conversation plane :-)
though I doubt you will get it to sing again
since it miss a few pieces

Dennis

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4224 posts in 3195 days


#13 posted 06-17-2012 06:30 PM

@ David Kirtley: Interesting about the Record equivalent. Suffice to say, if one is shopping for a compass plane, new or used, to know before purchasing whether it will do a sufficiently tight radius for the user’s needs. I should check the outside radius as well, someone might want to know that statistic too.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Bearpie's profile

Bearpie

2601 posts in 2479 days


#14 posted 06-17-2012 09:25 PM

After these comments, I was curious and really pored over the compass plane. It does say “Stanley & level co” on the forward knob with Pat’d date and measures 10 1/4” long. I also found a small pat’d June 1779. I do not know if there was a patent on it at that date but it sure made my chest fill!

I also checked to see what kind of radius it will plane. On the outside circle it will do an approximate 20” Dia and on the inside circle it will do about an 8 1/2” Dia. I even used the plane and to my surprise a beautiful curl came out! The blade is sharp but if honed a bit, it will cut even better! Thanks guys!

Yes, there is a jagged edge where the push handle of the had broken off!

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

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dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#15 posted 06-18-2012 12:15 AM

Bearpie, check out Google patents for June 17, 1879 and see what pops up. That thing looks so steampunk with the ornate knobs and interlocking gears – way cool. Imagine the thinking and patternmaking and casting and milling, all without computerized anything!

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