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Jointer Fence Slips Help

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Forum topic by groland posted 06-14-2012 03:25 PM 1187 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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groland

129 posts in 2159 days


06-14-2012 03:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer fence slippage

Hi,

I recently obtained a small jointer. Its fence is supported by a little “foot” that rests on the infeed table ahead of the cutters and at the end of the infeed table. At the end of the table there is a horizontal slot into which a very large T-bolt head is located. It allows the fence to be moved left or right. The T-bolt’s threaded shaft passes through an acred opening in a bracket attached to the end of the fence. This allows the fence angle relative to the bed to be set. Outside of this bracket there is a large flat washer and the “nut”” that is cranked down to fasten the fence bracket to the end of the table. So, in essence, this one “nut” fastens the washer, fence bracket and table together.

Now, my problem—the fence slips. The “nut” does have a short handle on a rod with which to tighten it, but no matter how tight I make it with my hands, the fence still slips. I can’t seem to get it tight enough to hold the fence securely.

Now my “bad”. Last night, when I was trying to loosen up these parts and figure out how it all works, I sprayed some WD-40 on these parts. So there may be a film of lubricant on some of them that is contributing to the slippage I’m experiencing. So I have the following questions:
1. What might I use to remove any WD-40 oily film from these parts to increase friction?
2 What other trick might I try to get a tighter fit among these parts? Some sort of large lock washer?

Any help appreciated.

George


5 replies so far

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2966 posts in 1033 days


#1 posted 06-14-2012 03:34 PM

It sounds like my Central Machinery jointer. Works the same way at least. Do you know the brand name? or a picture?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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groland

129 posts in 2159 days


#2 posted 06-14-2012 04:19 PM

Hi,

The jointer is a Central Machinery Model 30289.

I’ll try uploading a pic.

George

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

652 posts in 946 days


#3 posted 06-14-2012 07:14 PM

You should be able to tighten it enough to keep it from moving, regardless of the WD-40.. sounds like you are bottoming out on the T-bolt, which is keeping it from tightening all the way. Maybe a thicker washer (or two) to give you some more pull. That configuration is very common and has been used for at least 50 years with success.. here is the lock on my 1954 Boice-crane which is very similar (and locks down just fine!):

Cheers
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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groland

129 posts in 2159 days


#4 posted 06-15-2012 12:36 AM

Brad,

Yours is the second time today someone has suggested adding a washer. At this point I’m willing to try just about anything. The first person to suggest this was the tech help guy at Central Machinery, although all he did was read me the manual, which I can do. He had never actually seen one of these tools.

Okay, I just tried the washer and the situation is exactly the same. When I removed the “nut” from the threaded T-bolt, there was at least 3/8 inch more thread available, so unless I’m really not understanding the concept of “bottoming out”, this doesn’t seem to be the problem.

I get the fence approximately square to the bed. When I go to tighten it, it always rotates in the direction I am tightening, going out of square. I tighten it as much as I can without hammering on the handle and it is fairly easy to grab the fence top and rotate it. It just isn’t tight.

It is interesting to me to learn that this was a common way of handling fences on jointers and to see yours. I read all the reviews of the Central Jointer before I bought it, and I thought I was getting a pretty tried-and-true, solid performer.

So far, I haven’t found the key to solving this problem.

I notice the edge of your fence end has three bolts with little flanges that stick out over the bed. They look as though they would serve as stops of some kind. If you look at my right-hand picture of my jointer above, you’ll see similarly-positioned bolts. Mine are just bolts that sit there. They do not have any flanges on them and seem pointless. I wonder if I have some parts missing? Do these flanges assist in locking the fence dwon in position?

Thanks,

George

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MrUnix

652 posts in 946 days


#5 posted 06-15-2012 01:16 AM

I can’t imagine why it wouldn’t lock down given sufficient force.. maybe something is hanging up between the fence and table? Kind of hard to troubleshoot remotely :) Take some more pictures!

And yes, those little bolt thingies are the auto-stops.. for 135, 90 and 45 degrees. They flip out and engage the table so you have a positive mechanical stop.. set once and forget about it. Since yours don’t flip over to engage the table, look for a piece of metal on the table that will flip out instead. It should be recessed into the table some how and flips out to engage the bolts on your fence.

Cheers,
Brad

Edit: You do have a stop block.. part number #44 in your manual. It looks like it might be attached to the “T” bracket that the locking handle is also attached to.. diagram is a bit hard to read.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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