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Rockwell Motorized Miter Box 34-010 manual wanted

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Forum topic by dhazelton posted 06-13-2012 07:40 PM 8717 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


06-13-2012 07:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: rockwell power miter box 34-010 delta

As the title says…..

I picked up a clean one for ten bucks at a yardsale Sunday (didn’t need it, but ten dollars?). I found an exploded parts diagram at the vintage machinery reprints section, but would like a manual so I can set up the sacrificial table properly. I was going to pull the motor to check the bearings but the case wouldn’t split and I wonder if there is a trick there that the manual would explain.

Thanks!


11 replies so far

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MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#1 posted 06-13-2012 08:12 PM

I doubt the users manual will explain how to tear the machine apart.. best you can get is the exploded parts diagram and try to figure it out from that. If you are lucky, you might just run into someone who has gone down that road before and can give you some tips, but for some machines, that just doesn’t happen and you are on your own. The good news is that once you figure it out, then YOU become the resident expert on that machine and can help future travelers :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#2 posted 06-13-2012 10:15 PM

Yeah, it’s a fairly straightforward machine, just miters, no bevel, and the detentes are REALLY wide. Lock is a thumbscrew that bites into the table. And you need to add a wooden sacrificial table so the blade doesn’t cut into the aluminum table, which it has a few times. I didn’t realize when I picked it up that it was essentially the very first miter saw. Neat piece of history, anyway. When I got it I thought about using it to cut steel with an abrasive wheel but I think it deserves better than that.

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2136 days


#3 posted 06-13-2012 11:42 PM

I own one of these saws but I don’t have a manual. I also bought it second hand. I have had mine since the late 1970’s. A friend borrowed it and did cut steel with it until he broke the internal cog belt. He replaced the belt and finished his bit of work. He had worn the cutting wheel to a very small diamater so he was pressing the saw pretty hard. I asked him if his friend would sell it since I wanted one and his friend had bought it for one remodel and that was complete. I paid $75 for it with no manual or blade guard. The sacrificial table on mine has been replaced several times. It has some rubber washers between the wood and the metal tables. I tighten the screws until th etable get square. It compresses the rubber and you check it until you get it like you want it. I still use mine often and have a Bosch 4412 compound sliding miter saw too. This little saw is a workhorse. You need to keep a good sharp 9 inche blade on it for best performance. I have an 80 tooth Freud on mine.
I really wouldn’t use my saw to cut metal like my friend did before I rescued it. I will say it has served me well for over 30 years. 9 inch blades are a little hard to find but they can be bought.

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dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#4 posted 06-14-2012 12:24 AM

What impressed me Grandpa, was the little black switch where your thumb is. Must have been one of the first blade brakes around.

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2136 days


#5 posted 06-14-2012 01:56 AM

I used my brake uptil I wore the pad out. I need to try to get a new one because I also liked the feature. It was there if you wanted and yet you didn’t have to use it. A tool that was ahead of its time in many ways.

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Mooremj5

2 posts in 901 days


#6 posted 06-16-2014 07:19 PM

Not to hijack this thread, but I know at least a few readers have one of these. I inherited a 34-010 and can’t get the darn blade off. I assume one uses an allen wrench to hold the shaft as I could not find a lock. The nut moves but feels like it is getting tighter. Is it a standard right hand nut or am I doing something else wrong?

Thanks in advance!

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2136 days


#7 posted 06-21-2014 12:49 AM

Without going too look, I believe that is a left hand thread on that saw. You are correct, there is no blade lock. I use a block of wood and turn the teeth into the block. pull the wrench down. To adjust the sacrificial block, there are some rubber washers under the block. You tighten the screws on the high corners until it comes into alignment. The original wood block is not something you can throw a piece of 2×6 on to replace either. The case is difficult to separate. I needed to replace the power cord and it isn’t easy. I have replace the cog belt a couple of times. That is not too easy either but study it a bit and you will figure it out. I was able to buy 9 inch from McFeely’s as I recall. It is a Freud as I said above. I love the saw and the accuracy it offers. It is much heavier built than the modern saws.

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Mooremj5

2 posts in 901 days


#8 posted 07-21-2014 11:54 AM

Grandpa,

I was finally able to remove the nut and the threads are indeed left handed. I was thinking correctly but turning the wrong way!

Thanks for the reply and also the other tips. I am sure I will make use of them. I also have a newer DeWalt that miters and bevels, but find I prefer using the old Rockwell.

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Zeekid

2 posts in 735 days


#9 posted 11-29-2014 06:02 PM

Hi fellow blister busters.

I have a 34-010 I bought new in the 70’s,it has served me very well. (Still Does!). I taught both my daughters how to use it and now have grandchildren who can’t wait to get at my power tools. Ergo, does anyone know where to get a replacement brake pad? My wife won’t let me let them use this until I fix the brake. Lucky for me, I still have all the guards. Like most of you, I have a newer combo miter but the Rockwell is my mainstay.

Thanks!!

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Zeekid

2 posts in 735 days


#10 posted 12-01-2014 09:55 PM

More info on the Rockwell 34-010 Miter box.

After digging up all the old parts diagrams on the internet, it appears that the brake for this box is not a pad but some type of belt that is pushed in by a rod when you push the brake button. Time to try to take it apart and find out for sure. If anyone has any info, I would appreciate the heads up.

Thanks again.

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larrus

1 post in 41 days


#11 posted 10-24-2016 05:05 AM

Hello, I wanted to see if you guys could help me as it seems that you well the Rockwell 34-010.

I got one from my in-laws attic and the belt is broken. I would like to replace it, but I don’t know how to remove the driven pulley (#16 in the following parts diagram: http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1141/3676.pdf) in order to put the new belt.

Thanks in advance!

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