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220V vs 110V

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Forum topic by rockindavan posted 777 days ago 2203 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rockindavan

283 posts in 1237 days


777 days ago

Im looking to buy a G0715P tablesaw and I’m a little curious about the difference in noticeable power between 220 and 110V. My shop will be in a garage at a rental, so I’m assuming he won’t let me have someone rewire for 220V. I could look back in my notes from my power conversion class to see if there is much of a difference theoretically, but theory usually doesn’t pan out in the real world. I assume since they 220 runs at 8 amps, that the 110V would produce the same power (in Watts) as the 220 when the 110 runs at 16 amps.

Now for people who have run on both. Is there a difference in how the saw runs? I assume the 110V has higher inrush currents on startup, say 200 amps, would the 220V have half, and does this translate into longer motor life? Im a little concerned about tripping the breaker when I start it up. Hopefully someone has some experience with both..


25 replies so far

View Bill Davis's profile

Bill Davis

226 posts in 2525 days


#1 posted 777 days ago

Not much noticable difference but there could be some depending on the wiring used. Since 110V motor takes twice the current as an equiv HP 220V motor there is 4 times the power loss in the wiring assuming the same size wire. If the wiring is large enough guage that will be negligable or at lease not as likely to have an observable effect. If you are putting in new wiring, larger is better. If you wire for 220V you can potentially save by buying smaller wire size. I have run both and didnt notice any difference but do not remember the wire size used. Not sure how motor life is affected if any.

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knotscott

5369 posts in 1977 days


#2 posted 777 days ago

There is no difference in theory. The actual difference will depend on the particular circuit and the particular motor involved. In my case I did notice an improvement on 220v for both my 2hp contractor saw and 1.75hp hybrid saw. 220v tends to have less voltage loss during peak demand, so you might notice faster startup and faster recovery from bogging, but if your 110v circuit is dedicated to your saw and is up to sniff, you might not notice a difference at all.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11072 posts in 1706 days


#3 posted 777 days ago

I would first check the circuit in the garage of the rental. It might be 15 amp. If it is a 20 amp circuit with 12 ga wire, you might get away with it but don’t have anything else running when you kick it on. I have worked on some condos where the circuit in the garage also goes in the house and the GFI in the garage pops and who would ever guess the GFI for a bathroom would be in a garage.

You’re right about the amperage rating. if 220 volts draws 8 amps, 110 will draw 16 amps. Does it have the option of wiring it both ways?.............Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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TopamaxSurvivor

14604 posts in 2277 days


#4 posted 777 days ago

Generally, if there is a noticeable hesitation when starting the saw, you should use bigger wire or higher voltage.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View NormG's profile

NormG

3998 posts in 1605 days


#5 posted 777 days ago

110 works for me, as I do not have space for 220

-- Norman

View crashn's profile

crashn

518 posts in 1066 days


#6 posted 777 days ago

I have the G0715p and have run it both on 110 and 220. Cant really tell the difference, runs great either way. I do like the advantage of the lower amp draw on 220 and the fact that I get back a 110 socket for another tool.

-- Crashn - the only thing I make more of than sawdust is mistakes

View rockindavan's profile

rockindavan

283 posts in 1237 days


#7 posted 777 days ago

Im a little concerned about the distance from the box. The garage is detached and about 15 feet from the house. I’m hoping there is a box in the garage, and not just a wire run from inside the house, but I have a feeling it is. I guess i will have to make an assessment when I move in.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

459 posts in 800 days


#8 posted 777 days ago

That machine specifies 16A@110VAC which requires a 20A minimum circuit, so a standard 15A wall outlet isn’t sufficient. Check to see what kind of wiring is in the garage. You may be SOL either way.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1524 days


#9 posted 777 days ago

I have a Ridgid 3650 that I’ve run on both 110/220. Not really sure I can tell that much difference.

-- Life is good.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1156 posts in 898 days


#10 posted 777 days ago

Theoretically 220 gives you two overlapping waveforms of alternating current, so you have a smoother power delivery to the windings, which is supposed to make the motor happier. If you have a licensed electrician do the installation the owner of the property might be amenable to work performed as it adds value to their property. Have fun setting up a new space!

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

459 posts in 1362 days


#11 posted 777 days ago

The interesting thing about single phase 220 volt wiring is it is nothing but two separate 110 volt circuits that are 180 degrees out of phase with each other. The 220 wiring is two power wires and a ground (3 total). You can connect one of the power wires and the ground and you get 110 volts. The same with the other power wire. But between the two power wires is a 220 volt differential because they are 180 degrees out of phase. This can be easily understood by sketching it all out showing a sine curve and drawing out the phase shift, but the above is the basis of it.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2094 posts in 789 days


#12 posted 774 days ago

The big advantage with 220V over 110V is that it cuts the AMP draw in half and if we’re taking a fair few AMPS, that means a lot less heat. Less heat means the motor lasts longer and the machine can be run on smaller gauge wire. Some think erroneously that switching to 220V increases power – not so.

Sometimes inrush AMPS can cause a motor to blow a beaker if the AMP drawe is high because it is really high for a very short time on startup. I had some 110V Delta dust collectors (4 of them) and only one would start without blowing the breaker. I switched the lot to 220V and have had no troubles since.

Another advantage to 220V for machines is that they are then separated from lighting etc so there is less chance of overloading a circuit.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View mhakat's profile

mhakat

1 post in 23 days


#13 posted 23 days ago

The difference is safety. 110v (55+55 two cables) is safe compared to 220v (110+110 two cables). Electric shock with a 110v (compared to 55v) tool will do a lot of damage to the operator. power and durability will remain the same since Power=Voltage x Current. Power will only be affected if you use long thin cable as the voltage drop across cable will be high for a 110v which means you loose a lot of current due to cable resistance (remember that low losses are encountered when transporting high voltage electricity) thats why the grid is very high voltage.

View klassenl's profile

klassenl

113 posts in 1260 days


#14 posted 23 days ago

Sorry mhakat, but 110v is not made from 55+55.

I have run my General 50-200 on 110 and 240. The biggest difference is that it starts much better. The points made about less line loss are exactly on.

In theory the motor will last longer when run at 240.

-- When questioned about using glue on a garbage bin I responded, "Wood working is about good technique and lots of glue........I have the glue part down."

View jonah's profile

jonah

440 posts in 1900 days


#15 posted 23 days ago



The difference is safety. 110v (55+55 two cables) is safe compared to 220v (110+110 two cables). Electric shock with a 110v (compared to 55v) tool will do a lot of damage to the operator. power and durability will remain the same since Power=Voltage x Current. Power will only be affected if you use long thin cable as the voltage drop across cable will be high for a 110v which means you loose a lot of current due to cable resistance (remember that low losses are encountered when transporting high voltage electricity) thats why the grid is very high voltage.

- mhakat


This is complete nonsense, except for the last sentence. 120V is made up of one wire carrying 120 volts above ground. 240V is made up of two wires carrying 120 volts above ground, with each being exactly out of phase with the other. The difference between the two is 240V.

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