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Acceptable amount of deviation in a V-Belt

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Forum topic by Tyrone D posted 06-10-2012 02:36 AM 1275 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tyrone D

314 posts in 1054 days


06-10-2012 02:36 AM

Topic tags/keywords: dayco 3l240 v-belt chinese shit do not buy

Hello,
I purchased three Dayco FHP V-Belts from Lordco for my tablesaw today. I got home and put them on the saw and it started vibrating ridiculous amounts. I took the belts off thinking it was my motor shaft but that was rotating well. I looked at the belts and the worst one deviates ~1/4”!
I didn’t see the glorious, “Made in China” written on it at the store; if I had I would’ve raised a fuss and said I’m not buying these. -Please don’t turn this into another one of those outsourcing threads.

I looked at the old belts which are too short and ready to break, they’re perfectly flat.

Am I being crazy or is this unacceptable on machinery?

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."


10 replies so far

View devann's profile

devann

1735 posts in 1414 days


#1 posted 06-10-2012 03:14 AM

I know you just bought the V-belt but a link belt would run smoother and last longer. If you try one I doubt that you’ll go back to V-belts.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View Tyrone D's profile

Tyrone D

314 posts in 1054 days


#2 posted 06-10-2012 03:20 AM

The problem that a few other Lumberjocks made me aware of with link belts: They’re not designed to go on a cabinet saw, or that it wont benefit from having a link belt. It’s two fixed points and the pulleys can be aligned near perfect. Link belts excel on contractor saws as the motors are suspended and the belt tension is from gravity. Oftentimes these arms are hard to align and it’s a longer distance than a cabinet saw.
That’s my interpretation of what I learned about link belts.

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

607 posts in 920 days


#3 posted 06-10-2012 03:30 AM

By ‘deviate’, I’m guessing that you mean the lengths are different? Did you by a matched set or did you just pick up three individual belts?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Tyrone D's profile

Tyrone D

314 posts in 1054 days


#4 posted 06-10-2012 03:33 AM

The lengths are all the same. When I say, “Deviate” I mean from side to side. If I lay the belt on a table it doesn’t touch the table at all spots.

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

View petergdenmark's profile

petergdenmark

52 posts in 1140 days


#5 posted 06-10-2012 04:22 AM

8mm deviation is a lot, and i would take them back. That said – try to put more of tension on the belts by forcing the motor down with a stick levered under the table, when tigtening the mounting bolts.

Also – check that the pulleys holding the belts are coplanar with a straight edge – thereis no adjustability on your saw, but you can shim the motor mount.

I paid $80 for my 3 belts, since they had some kind of reinforcement.

-- I'm from Denmark, but live in Sweden.

View Tyrone D's profile

Tyrone D

314 posts in 1054 days


#6 posted 06-10-2012 04:51 AM

I was actually taking the belts back regardless of this deviation or not. They are too short and I’m maxed out for tension adjustment.

I can’t actually set the pulleys with a straightedge as the pulleys are different and the distance to the first groove from the edge is about an 1/8” more on the drive pulley. I was thinking I could use a torpedo level and level the trunnions to the arbor pulley then shim the motor so the drive pulley is coplanar.
According to this guide here:
http://www.theadvancedteam.com/cases/Seven%20Steps%20to%20Belt%20Maintenance_white%20paper_.pdf
Misalignment should be less than 1/2degree per foot.

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

View Tyrone D's profile

Tyrone D

314 posts in 1054 days


#7 posted 06-11-2012 03:02 PM

Dayco has a cogged belt that would work.
http://www.accessdayco.com/Industrial.aspx
I can’t give the direct link as the way the website is setup but it’s the Dayco Gold Label Industrial VX-Wedge Belt 3VX.
I’m assuming this is very similar to the McMaster Carr belt.

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2932 posts in 1965 days


#8 posted 06-11-2012 03:45 PM

Gates series V80 belts are all matched for the same size and type. I use these on my cabinet saw; no problem. Link belts will stretch different amounts and will never “match”.

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Tyrone D

314 posts in 1054 days


#9 posted 06-11-2012 03:54 PM

If I could find somewhere local that sells them, I’m going to get Gates belts.
One thing I don’t understand with them though, how do I tell what model number I need? On the Dayco and McMaster-Carr website it tells you a preset size, AX in this case then you look at the list for the length you need. I need a 25” belt so I will need the AX23. I couldn’t find anything like this on the Gates website.

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

607 posts in 920 days


#10 posted 06-11-2012 06:36 PM

Anybody use Kevlar? I’ve got them on my jointer and band saw (PIX blue series) and they have worked flawlessly and seem to hold up a lot better than anything else I’ve tried.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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