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Forum topic by MsDebbieP posted 05-02-2007 03:46 PM 1000 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2913 days


05-02-2007 03:46 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tips laminate

It’s time has come

Can someone explain ”lamination”? People talk about laminated wood and I think I know what that is but it’s time that I added this bit of techno knowledge to my list of woodworking brilliancy.

What is it? How do you achieve it? Why do you use it? etc.

Thanks in advance.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)


15 replies so far

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oscorner

4564 posts in 3063 days


#1 posted 05-02-2007 03:49 PM

I got to visit DollarBill’s shop, yesterday. He does some fine work and laminations. Maybe DollarBill can give you some pointers? I haven’t tried it yet, myself.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Cathy Krumrei's profile

Cathy Krumrei

364 posts in 2939 days


#2 posted 05-02-2007 04:00 PM

When I laminate for a mantel, my process is taking boards we first put them in the planer for a even smooth surface to give the glue better contact, I then start with one board and then the next board is going opposite grains. I stack them until I get the thickness I need.
I then go and use Titebond glue on the first board then stack and glue. I then have a press my husband built-we call “Brutus” and put the layer of boards in the press and put pressure on the whole length. I let it sit for 4 days or so. Once the time is up I pull the piece out and now I have one junk of boards made to make a mantel. This gives the mantel the moving process that goes with wood so no cupping or bowing or cracking.
Lamination is a glueing process to get a bigger piece to work with. My deer panel was laminated to make it look like one piece. The wood was cut into angles then glued between each piece then clamped to make one 30 inch piece. You rarely can get a chunk of wood these days like that. If you could, I would still recut and laminate it for shifting purposes. Hope this helps.

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2913 days


#3 posted 05-02-2007 05:00 PM

Thanks. Yes it helps.

I’ll have to go have another look at your deer panel

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 2891 days


#4 posted 05-04-2007 06:13 AM

Debbie -

My first thought when I saw this post is “Oh boy she is tackling another technique”! You are amazing with your thirst for info.

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 3067 days


#5 posted 05-04-2007 06:27 AM

It usually refers to gluing one or more thin sheets of material. A thin veneer of wood is laminated onto a larger board.

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2913 days


#6 posted 05-04-2007 12:27 PM

don’t get too excited David—I’m not tackling anything lol .. just became brave enough to ask :D

Dennis, sounds like a great way to conserve our lumber—putting a thin layer of quality wood over some cheaper, more renewable boards.

Thanks everyone..

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3052 days


#7 posted 05-04-2007 01:19 PM

Plywood is a good example of laminating.
I laminated thin strips together to make the bent wood in my Windsor chair backs.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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woodspar

710 posts in 2852 days


#8 posted 05-04-2007 02:42 PM

In fact, I believe that what Debbie said: “a great way to conserve lumber,” and what Dick said “plywood is a good example of laminating,” go together in the sense that plywood was invented partly to conserve lumber. It was an early “green” building material. (I cannot claim credit for this observation; I saw it on TOH where they are doing a “green” building rehab in Austin TX.)

-- John

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Chip

1904 posts in 2845 days


#9 posted 05-04-2007 05:43 PM

It’s a good way to make that Willow last longer Deb ;-)

-- Better to say nothing and be thought the fool... then to speak and erase all doubt!

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2913 days


#10 posted 05-04-2007 05:45 PM

I’ve already thought of that, Chip haha!!!

I can use the Little Ripper to hold the logs while cutting off slivers of wood on the bandsaw… a little glue, some junk wood, like . oh… oak or something hahahaha. and voila, a transformation into REAL wood—willow!!

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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Chip

1904 posts in 2845 days


#11 posted 05-04-2007 05:47 PM

Just don’t put the Willow over Walnut… PLEASE!!!! ;-)

-- Better to say nothing and be thought the fool... then to speak and erase all doubt!

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2913 days


#12 posted 05-04-2007 05:51 PM

lol I was going to type that instead of oak but I didn’t want to give you a heart attack lol

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Chip's profile

Chip

1904 posts in 2845 days


#13 posted 05-04-2007 05:53 PM

Whew! My heart was racing until I read oak. LOL.

-- Better to say nothing and be thought the fool... then to speak and erase all doubt!

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 3063 days


#14 posted 05-05-2007 05:36 AM

Willow over Oak? Would that be considered a medium wood? LOL.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Jeffrey's profile

Jeffrey

15 posts in 2796 days


#15 posted 05-05-2007 06:56 AM

I would be really carefull if thinking of vennering over a red oak substrate. Oak has a very open grain and there is a pretty good chance it will telegraph through the veneer. Not Good! If you are useing a paper backed veneer or a veneer over a 64th of an inch than disregard this info and proceed as planned. A couple good hardwood substrates are soft maple and yellow poplar. I have used both in the past with excellant results. A good manufactured wood is MDF or Baltic Birch.

-- Jeff - Bellevue,Ne.

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